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Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood
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Student Electives in Low-resource Countries: Ethical Considerations: Kaveh Khoshnood

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Preparing Undergraduates for Short-term Global Health Research Experience …

Preparing Undergraduates for Short-term Global Health Research Experience

Kaveh Khoshnood, PhD
Yale School of Public Health

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Preparing Undergraduates for Short-term Global Health Research Experience 18 th Annual GHEC Conference April 3-5, 2009 University of Washington Kaveh Khoshnood, PhD Yale School of Public Health
  • 2. Goals for this Presentation
    • To Share my experience in preparing Yale undergraduates embarking on their often very first global health research experience
    • To get your constructive criticism !
  • 3. My Background
    • Trained as an infectious disease epidemiologist
    • Faculty at Yale School of Public Health
    • Research:
      • mostly focused on HIV/AIDS and TB in US and Internationally; increasingly interested in bioethics and Health and Conflict
    • Teaching:
      • HIV/AIDS and ethics for MPH students
      • Global Health lecture course and a GH research Methods Workshop for undergraduates
  • 4. Global Health Research Workshop for Yale Undergraduates
    • Why this workshop and why me?!
    • What is the objective?
    • What is the approach?
    • How is it organized?
    • What are the lessons learned?
  • 5. 1- Why this workshop and why me?!
    • Increasing demand for advice and mentorship from undergraduates for GH Research Projects
    • Lack of faculty interest / availability at Yale College
    • My concern with lack of student preparedness
    • Non-existence of other suitable courses/ workshops
    • Desire / need to be effective and efficient
  • 6. 2 - The Objective?
    • To prepare Yale Sophomores and Juniors interested in pursuing global health research for an enriching academic experience.
      • The focus is on field-based health related research proposed in low-resource countries.
  • 7. Student Commitments
    • To develop and conduct the most rigorous scientific and ethical research proposal and to share with Yale and broader scientific community upon return
    • To assist other workshop participants to do the same
  • 8. 3 - The Approach?
    • Create an awareness of the “big picture”; GH inequities and the role of research
    • Motivate students to strive to become independent researchers ( vs. research assistants )
    • Embed research ethics in the larger context of the research enterprise
    • Mixed research methods (quantitative & qualitative)
  • 9. 3 - The Approach? (continued)
    • Cultivate critical / analytical thinking skills
    • Instill a sense of respect for integrity of research as well as humility and self awareness
    • Focus on actual student proposals
    • Assist with but not substitute the role of the project faculty advisor
  • 10. 4 - How is it organized?
    • Non-credit
    • Begins with “letter of intent” from students in late fall
    • Size: 15-20 students (sophomores and juniors)
    • Meets late fall & first half of spring semester – Friday afternoons!
    • Workshop website for posting readings, lectures, funding and other resources
    • MPH student as a teaching assistant
    • Guest lecturers as needed (qualitative research methods)
    • Text Book: Designing Clinical Research: An Epidemiological Perspective. Hulley et al. 3 rd Edition plus additional readings
  • 11. Fall Module
    • 4-6 mostly didactic lectures (1.5 hours each)
    • Includes introductory lecture on GH (cultural, political and social complexities) ; fundamentals of research design (quantitative and qualitative), research ethics
    • Presentation by a representative from the relevant Yale IRB about IRB approval process at Yale and host country
    • Sharing of information about available fellowships; research projects and sites and faculty mentors.
  • 12. Spring Module
      • Open to students who completed fall module and have identified a Yale faculty mentor and an in country preceptor for their projects
      • Critique and peer review of student proposals (competition among students for various fellowships)
      • guiding students through the human subjects research approval process
      • Individual review and mentoring outside of workshop as needed and as time allows
  • 13. 5 - Lessons learned ? (three workshops completed so far)
      • Works best when you stick to the rules!
        • Participation in fall component required
        • Take peer review seriously
      • Non-credit vs. credit
      • Importance of a skilled Teaching Assistant
      • More training in biostatistics needed before and after
  • 14. Lessons learned ? (continued)
      • Need for incorporating a more rigorous evaluation
      • No obvious problem with dual commitments / competition
      • Role of the project faculty advisor?
      • Pedagogical theory/model?

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