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Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7
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Clmn Ais For April 2010 Mn Presentation April 7

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  • Wisconsin’s AIS programs are supported by the Wisconsin Lakes Partnership.
  • Volunteer Monitoring -DNR-UW Extension partnership -As with watercraft inspection, both DNR staff and volunteers monitor lakes for invasive species—staff monitor for spiny waterfleas and zebra mussel larvae. Volunteers monitor for adult zebra mussels, invasive plants, rusty crayfish and invasive snails. -Data collected by volunteers are very important in tracking and mapping the spread of invasive species. -Volunteers also collect data on other indicators of lake health—water clarity, water chemistry, etc
  • Transcript

    • 1. Aquatic Invasive Species in Wisconsin Name: Laura Herman Date: April 21, 2010 Aquatic Invasive Species Forum
    • 2. Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Science Citizens Education
    • 3. Wisconsin’s Aquatic Invasive Species Program <ul><li>Education & Outreach </li></ul><ul><li>Watercraft Inspection </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer Monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Purple Loosestrife Biological Control </li></ul><ul><li>Aquatic Invasive Species Grants </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Rules to Prevent Spread </li></ul>
    • 4. Differences Between CBCW & CLMN <ul><li>Protecting lake from AIS </li></ul><ul><li>Preventing AIS from spreading to another lake </li></ul><ul><li>Defined hours (high use periods) </li></ul><ul><li>A lot of contact with public </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring along shoreline near landings </li></ul><ul><li>Checking to see if AIS got into lake </li></ul><ul><li>Some defined monitoring times (based upon AIS monitoring for) </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal contact with public </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring along shorelines, beaches, shallow water areas, & deep water areas </li></ul><ul><li>Casual observer vs True Monitor </li></ul>
    • 5. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network <ul><li>1986 – 126 volunteers collecting secchi data on 113 Lakes </li></ul><ul><li>1990 – pilot expansion – 25 lakes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Secchi, total phosphorus, chlorophyll, temperature & dissolved oxygen </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1991 – 2005 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Secchi, total phosphorus, chlorophyll, temperature, & dissolved oxygen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some regions use volunteers to collect data on Aquatic Invasive Species </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2006 – Aquatic Invasive Species Statewide effort initiated </li></ul><ul><li>2007 –Trainers teaching Secchi and AIS monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>2009 – Additional AIS added. Online data entry </li></ul><ul><li>Future – Add species and methods as the need arises </li></ul>
    • 6. <ul><li>AIS Monitoring goals: </li></ul><ul><li>Better state coverage </li></ul><ul><li>More volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency </li></ul><ul><li>Approved protocols </li></ul><ul><li>More species </li></ul><ul><li>Online data entry and data retrieval </li></ul>
    • 7. Training opportunities <ul><li>Wisconsin’s Lake Convention – over 500 attend </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The Casual Observer” for Clean Boats, Clean Waters and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Citizen Lake Monitoring Network AIS monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clean Boats, Clean Waters 3-hour workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Citizen Lake Monitoring Network AIS 3-hour workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On-line data entry through the Surface Water Integrated Monitoring System (SWIMS) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>County Aquatic Invasive Species Staff host workshops through AIS grants </li></ul><ul><li>Trained Trainers host workshops </li></ul><ul><li>Lake Association and District meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Super-Spreaders – target audiences on super spreader lakes </li></ul>
    • 8. Casual Observer vs Trained Monitor <ul><li>Casual observer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More general observer (simplified training) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not follow protocols </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select species they monitor for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often do not do data entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seldom report if they do NOT find AIS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Examples - </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shoreline sweep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Three Lakes volunteers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lake meeting presentations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Trained monitor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More technical training (longer & more detailed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitoring follows standard monitoring protocols (meshes with DNR protocols) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Select species they monitor for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enter data into SWIMS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Report if they do NOT find AIS </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. What is expected of the trainers (full AIS monitoring – not casual observer) <ul><li>Workshops conducted by trained Trainers </li></ul><ul><li>Follow all protocols to the AIS monitoring workshops </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PowerPoint presentations provided for your use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manuals provided to you </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cover all species </li></ul><ul><li>Explain data entry (SWIMS) </li></ul><ul><li>What do I need from you. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Date and time for workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Location of workshop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workshop host information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who will be the trainers at the workshop and who will be assisting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attendance worksheet filled out & returned to me </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. Volunteers cover the entire state, but most are in our “lakes rich” areas and areas with few AIS
    • 11. <ul><li>Why Volunteer Monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteers know their lakes </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteers can cover more lakes than agency staff can cover </li></ul><ul><li>Results so far – Success! </li></ul><ul><li>Many of the new EWM and mystery snail “finds” have been from volunteers. </li></ul>Wisconsin’s Aquatic Invasive Species Program
    • 12. <ul><li>Volunteers love the hands on ID time </li></ul><ul><li>Trainings close to when they monitor </li></ul><ul><li>Pontoon boats – not needed, but helpful </li></ul><ul><li>Casual observer or trained monitor options </li></ul>What Volunteers Like/Need
    • 13. Announcement of workshops <ul><ul><li>Trainings will be posted at these websites – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr/uwexlakes/CLMN/training.asp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr/uwexlakes/CBCW/workshops-schedule.asp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.eeinwisconsin.org/core/default.aspx?s=0.0.16.2209 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// invasivespecies.wi.gov/awareness/event_request.asp </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. What volunteers receive <ul><li>Equipment in the free kit: </li></ul><ul><li>Manual / handbook </li></ul><ul><li>Hand lens </li></ul><ul><li>Through the Looking Glass book </li></ul><ul><li>22-set laminates (EWM, curly-leaf pondweed, purple loosestrife and look-a-likes) </li></ul><ul><li>Zip-lock bags (for plant collection) </li></ul><ul><li>Sharpies (to record info on the Zip-lock bags) </li></ul><ul><li>Watch and wild cards, ID and informational pamphlets </li></ul>
    • 15. Manual components <ul><li>DNR and UWEX Contacts </li></ul><ul><li>Section 1 - Aquatic Invasive Species: Getting Started. </li></ul><ul><li>Section 2 - Eurasian water-milfoil </li></ul><ul><li>Section 3 - Curly-leaf pondweed </li></ul><ul><li>Section 4 – Purple loosestrife </li></ul><ul><li>Section 5 – Rusty crayfish </li></ul><ul><li>Section 6 – Zebra mussels </li></ul><ul><li>Section 7 – Mystery snails </li></ul><ul><li>Section 8 – Waterfleas </li></ul><ul><li>Section 9 – Freshwater Jellyfish </li></ul><ul><li>Section 10 – Hydrilla </li></ul><ul><li>Section 11 – New Zealand mudsnail </li></ul><ul><li>Section 12 – Native water-milfoil weevil </li></ul>
    • 16. Section layout <ul><li>Background/Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Life Cycle </li></ul><ul><li>Identification </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When to Monitor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where do I Sample </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to Monitor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collecting Samples </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Labeling Samples </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equipment Needed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Setting Up a Monitoring Team </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting </li></ul><ul><li>What to do with Suspect Specimens </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Materials & Supporting Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Data Reporting Forms </li></ul>
    • 17. Invasive Plant monitored for Linda Wilson, University of Idaho, Bugwood.org
    • 18. Critters monitored for
    • 19. Critters monitored for - cont
    • 20. Future species? Others? Can be added as needed.
    • 21. Report Findings – Statewide Database Surface Water Inventory Management System (SWIMS) <ul><li>General public </li></ul><ul><ul><li>access to data and maps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>report AIS findings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Volunteers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>access to data and maps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>report, document and enter data on AIS findings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Staff </li></ul><ul><ul><li>access to data and maps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>report, document and enter data on AIS findings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>verify and voucher general public and volunteer findings </li></ul></ul>
    • 22. Used mainly by general public so they can report new “finds”
    • 23. Staff verify and go through the vouchering process
    • 24. Staff & trained volunteers
    • 25.  
    • 26.  
    • 27.  
    • 28.  
    • 29.  
    • 30. Data entry pilot (2011?) <ul><li>I-Phone & Palm pilot technology </li></ul><ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Uses the infrastructure we have set up in SWIMS (security, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Can avoid programming for specific brands of phones </li></ul><ul><li>Would automatically work for all of our data entry forms (Secchi, AIS, River monitoring, Loons, etc). </li></ul><ul><li>Cost to develop would be minimal </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Would require user to have </li></ul><ul><li>phone/PDA with a Data Plan & Access to a 3G network or Wi-Fi </li></ul><ul><li>3G coverage will be more widely available & more folks will have the phones by the time we have pilot complete </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes a 3G network would NOT be accessible @ a landing. Inspector would have to resort to paper/entering the data later </li></ul><ul><li>A phone & data plan costs money. </li></ul>Any Interest?
    • 31. Tailor the program for the volunteers.
    • 32. Special Thanks Editing and “cool-afying”: Erin McFarlane. Photos: Paul Skawinski, Bob Korth, DNR staff and Google.
    • 33. Wisconsin AIS websites <ul><li>General Information on Citizen Lake monitoring - http:// www.uwsp.edu/cnr/uwexlakes/clmn / </li></ul><ul><li>Publications / manuals - http:// www.uwsp.edu/cnr/uwexlakes/clmn/publications.asp </li></ul><ul><li>WI Department of Natural Resources AIS data – </li></ul><ul><li>http:// dnr.wi.gov /invasives/ </li></ul><ul><li>http:// dnr.wi.gov/invasives/aquatic/whattodo / </li></ul>
    • 34. <ul><li>Laura Herman </li></ul><ul><li>Lakes Education Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>Citizen Lake Monitoring Network </li></ul><ul><li>107 Sutliff Ave. </li></ul><ul><li>Rhinelander, WI 54501 </li></ul><ul><li>(715) 365-8998 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr/uwexlakes/ </li></ul>
    • 35. Red Swamp Crayfish <ul><li>Dark red in color (a genetic mutation may turn the body and/or claws blue) </li></ul><ul><li>Raised bright red spots covering the body and claws </li></ul><ul><li>Black wedge-shaped stripe on the top of the abdomen </li></ul><ul><li>Vary in length from 2 to 5 inches. </li></ul><ul><li>Prefer marshes, swamps, ponds and slow moving rivers and streams, but have become established in lakes. They are tolerant of fluctuating water levels and can survive long dry spells by remaining in burrows or crawling over land to other water sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Mate in autumn and lay eggs in spring to early summer. </li></ul><ul><li>The number of eggs varies with the size of the female, (as many as 650 eggs at a time). </li></ul><ul><li>Distribution in Wisconsin in 2009 - ponds in German Town, Washington Co. and City of Kenosha, Kenosha Co. </li></ul>
    • 36. Red Swamp Crayfish
    • 37.  
    • 38.  
    • 39. Brazilian Waterweed <ul><li>Stems can reach 15 feet in length. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaves arranged in whorls of 4-6 leaves and leaves are ¾ - 2 inches long & serrated. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaves are attached directly to the stem. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaves below growing tips often curve downwards. </li></ul><ul><li>Adventitious roots are freely produced on the stem. </li></ul><ul><li>Plant Reproduces by stolons & stem fragments. Can spread from a single plant </li></ul><ul><li>Plant forms mats dense enough to restrict water movement, trap sediment and cause fluctuations in water quality. It can out compete Eurasian water milfoil . </li></ul><ul><li>Look-alikes: hydrilla (AIS) and our native waterweeds (Elodea canadensis & Elodea nuttallii) </li></ul><ul><li>Brazilian waterweed, a top selling aquarium and pond plant, is often sold under the name Anacharis and is also known as Brazilian elodea or &quot;oxygenating plant&quot;. It is believed to have been introduced in the United States by the aquarium trade. </li></ul><ul><li>Found in one pond in Portage Co. </li></ul>
    • 40. Yellow Floating-Heart <ul><li>Circular to slightly heart shaped floating leaves are 1-6” in diameter. Leaf edges are slight wavy or scalloped </li></ul><ul><li>Leaves are green to yellow-green above, and are often purple underside </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow flowers arise above the water surface </li></ul><ul><li>The fruit is a ½-1” beaked capsule that contains many flat, seeds with winged margins (which help with floatation and attachment to avian vectors) </li></ul><ul><li>Prefers slow moving rivers, lakes, reservoirs and ponds, but can also grow in damp mud, swamps and wetlands. </li></ul><ul><li>Look-a-likes - water lilies, Spadderdock and Watershield </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow-floating heart is a popular water garden plant, and the ability to order this plant over the internet and through mail order gives it the ability to travel to all parts of the world. In the locales where it has been introduced, it has often become the dominant plant species. Yellow-floating heart is very difficult to control due to its ability to form a new plant from rhizomes, stolons, separated leaves, or seeds. </li></ul>
    • 41.  

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