Michael HaslerLecturer, UT Austin McCombs School of Business20+ Years in leadership at Applied Materials, General Motors, ...
YOU HAVE A NEW JOB. CONGRATULATIONS!
DON’T BLOW IT.
§ Our source: Mike Hasler§ UT Austin McCombs School of Business, operations managementlecturer§ More than 20 years as a...
§ Know your manager’s assistantby name. He or she is thegatekeeper.§ Never think of yourself assuperior.http://www.today...
§ Respect personal boundaries.§ At some point you will work forsomeone who was previously apeer. Don’t overstep your fri...
§ Business requires confidentiality.§ Starting a sentence with, “Don’ttell anyone, but …” should soundyour internal alar...
§ List action items and deadlinesup front or in the subject line, notburied in a rambling message.§ Avoid “Reply to All....
§ You’ll be happier and moresuccessful in an organization thatfits you best, even if you start at alower salary.§ Don’t ...
§ If you’re habitually late, you willlose credibility.§ Make punctuality a priority now.It’s more difficult to break a b...
§ Applied Materials chairman emeritus Jim Morgan’sphilosophy as a manager:§ Good news is no news. In other words, it sho...
§ Bad news should be followed by solutions.§ Unloading your problem on your boss’sshoulders doesn’t help him or her solv...
§ Back up your position with data,not random opinions.§ If the data goes against yourintuition, don’t ignore it. Gathera...
§ Try to work for someone who develops and promotes staff.§ As a manager, be the person people want to work forbecause t...
§ Don’t ever be that person who goestoo far. Know your drink limit, andnever exceed it with businesscolleagues.§ Your re...
§ A lot of people work hard and get good results.§ Learn about other departments and companies. Be the person yourboss t...
§ Say “Good morning” to everyone.§ Write hand-written notes of congratulations,appreciation, and condolences.§ You will...
GOOD LUCK OUT THERE. YOU’LL BE GREAT.
Thanks for reading. Get more faculty expertise, career advice, alumni andstudent success stories, CEO insights, business s...
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
13 Rules for Corporate Survival
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13 Rules for Corporate Survival

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Learn the rules that will help you avoid mistakes and keep your career on track, from a veteran corporate manager and University of Texas McCombs School of Business faculty member.

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13 Rules for Corporate Survival

  1. 1. Michael HaslerLecturer, UT Austin McCombs School of Business20+ Years in leadership at Applied Materials, General Motors, & Nissanhttp://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  2. 2. YOU HAVE A NEW JOB. CONGRATULATIONS!
  3. 3. DON’T BLOW IT.
  4. 4. § Our source: Mike Hasler§ UT Austin McCombs School of Business, operations managementlecturer§ More than 20 years as an executive at General Motors, Nissan, andApplied Materials§ Helped create Applied Materials’ Leadership Development Program§ Ph.D. in Human Resource Development§ “I created these rules after making the mistakes myself.”http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/FOLLOW THESE RULES, KEEP YOUR CAREER ON TRACK
  5. 5. § Know your manager’s assistantby name. He or she is thegatekeeper.§ Never think of yourself assuperior.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  6. 6. § Respect personal boundaries.§ At some point you will work forsomeone who was previously apeer. Don’t overstep your friendshipor put your boss in a position ofhaving to defend your friendship.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  7. 7. § Business requires confidentiality.§ Starting a sentence with, “Don’ttell anyone, but …” should soundyour internal alarm to keep quiet.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  8. 8. § List action items and deadlinesup front or in the subject line, notburied in a rambling message.§ Avoid “Reply to All.”http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  9. 9. § You’ll be happier and moresuccessful in an organization thatfits you best, even if you start at alower salary.§ Don’t be surprised if it takes a fewtries to discover what you like.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  10. 10. § If you’re habitually late, you willlose credibility.§ Make punctuality a priority now.It’s more difficult to break a badhabit later in your career.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  11. 11. § Applied Materials chairman emeritus Jim Morgan’sphilosophy as a manager:§ Good news is no news. In other words, it shouldn’t be news that thingsare going well.§ No news is bad news. That means the manager is in the dark.§ Bad news is good news. The problem has been identified and now wecan fix it.§ Make sure the boss doesn’t hear your bad news fromsomeone else first. Never let your boss be blindsided.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  12. 12. § Bad news should be followed by solutions.§ Unloading your problem on your boss’sshoulders doesn’t help him or her solve it.§ Think of multiple options and yourrecommended course of action before yougo in.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  13. 13. § Back up your position with data,not random opinions.§ If the data goes against yourintuition, don’t ignore it. Gatheradditional or different data.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  14. 14. § Try to work for someone who develops and promotes staff.§ As a manager, be the person people want to work forbecause they know they will be developed.§ Train your own replacement so that your department canpromote you without suffering.§ Be an expert, the go-to person, at something, especially earlyin your career.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  15. 15. § Don’t ever be that person who goestoo far. Know your drink limit, andnever exceed it with businesscolleagues.§ Your reputation is always on theline.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  16. 16. § A lot of people work hard and get good results.§ Learn about other departments and companies. Be the person yourboss turns to for information.§ Participate in company charity events, volunteer for committees. Beknown. But be genuine.§ “Successful networking is not how many people you know, it’s howmany people know you.” --John Daly, communications andmanagement professor, University of Texas at Austinhttp://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  17. 17. § Say “Good morning” to everyone.§ Write hand-written notes of congratulations,appreciation, and condolences.§ You will meet thousands of miserable peoplein your career. Don’t be one of them.http://www.today.mccombs.utexas.edu/
  18. 18. GOOD LUCK OUT THERE. YOU’LL BE GREAT.
  19. 19. Thanks for reading. Get more faculty expertise, career advice, alumni andstudent success stories, CEO insights, business school news and more:McCombs TODAY blogUT McCombs School of Business@UTexasMcCombs
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