WELCOME Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 www.stthomas.edu/careerdevelopment © 2007 UST Career Devel...
Resume Writing Career Development Center University of St. Thomas © 2007 UST Career Development Center
Resume Writing <ul><li>What is a resume?  </li></ul><ul><li>When is it used? </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
Before getting started… <ul><li>Remember:  A resume is your own personal selling tool!  It is a personal reflection of YOU...
What makes an excellent resume?  <ul><li>Free of typographical and spelling errors </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly formatted, or...
What makes an excellent resume? continued <ul><li>Margins </li></ul><ul><li>Font type/style </li></ul><ul><li>Format-bulle...
Typical Resume Categories <ul><li>Contact Information </li></ul><ul><li>Objective </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><u...
<ul><li>The following slides will provide some examples of information that might be contained in each of the previously m...
Resume Categories: Identification <ul><li>Name </li></ul><ul><li>Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail </li></ul><ul><li>Phon...
Resume Categories : Objective <ul><li>Tells the reader the focus of the candidate’s search </li></ul><ul><li>Can include: ...
A strong objective <ul><li>Indicates what you’ll be giving, just as much as what you’ll be getting. </li></ul><ul><li>Can ...
Samples of good OBJECTIVES : <ul><li>Seeking an internship in public relations.  </li></ul><ul><li>An entry level position...
Resume Categories : Education   <ul><li>Name and location of  university.  </li></ul><ul><li>Type of degree (BA, BSBA, BS,...
Resume Categories : Experiences © 2007 UST Career Development Center <ul><li>This may include </li></ul><ul><ul><li>full-t...
Briefly describe for each position:   <ul><li>Job title, dates of employment, name of organization/company, and locations ...
Components of a Resume: Activities <ul><li>List any on campus clubs, memberships, elected positions, etc. </li></ul><ul><l...
Resume Categories :Other   <ul><li>Computer skills/technical </li></ul><ul><li>Languages  </li></ul><ul><li>Travel </li></...
Components of a Resume: References <ul><li>References Available Upon Request </li></ul><ul><li>You can include “References...
Putting It All Together…   Things to Remember <ul><li>There is no perfect resume – only great works in progress </li></ul>...
Putting It All Together Final Details <ul><li>Check for grammatical, spelling & typing errors </li></ul><ul><li>Critique! ...
Next Steps… Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 Make an appointment or  come to pop-in/walk-in hours  ...
Additional Resources <ul><li>Handouts </li></ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul><ul><li>Audio Guides </li></ul><ul><li>Books in ...
THANK YOU Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 http://www.stthomas.edu/careerdevelopment/ © 2007 UST Ca...
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Resume Webinar

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Learn more about how to write effective resumes with this presentation from UST Career Development.

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  • Hello my name is Diane Crist, I am the director of the Career Development Center. This is a narrated presentation. Make sure your speakers are on and the volume is adjusted. If you need an alternative to the audio narration, speaker notes can be viewed from the notes tab section of this presentation. You have complete control over the pace of this presentation, you can jump to a topic by selecting it from the outline to the left of your screen. Listen to the presentation in its entirety , or pause, play, review and advance at any time using the navigation buttons.
  • You know that a resume is an important marketing tool. Most often the goal of a resume is to obtain an interview, but it can also be used as you network for positions. This workshop will provide you with information to help you write a strong resume that effectively presents your credentials, experiences, and accomplishments. We will provide you with a general overview and then discuss each section of the resume in detail. As a result of viewing this presentation, you will understand the purpose of your resume, and you will learn how to write a strong resume. Let’s begin!
  • What is a resume? A resume is a professional presentation of what you can do for an employer. A resume allows you to be promote your strengths. When is a resume used? While it is important to network and speak with employers, your résumé is the first professional impression that employers will have of you. It allows you to demonstrate how your skills and experiences match the employers needs. It also provides you with an opportunity to differentiate yourself from other candidates. It demonstrates how your unique set of experiences can contribute to their organization. And finally, your resume gives employers a reason to ask you to interview.
  • Remember: A resume is your own personal selling tool! It is a personal reflection of YOU! You have options when writing a resume, be thoughtful and look at samples of other resumes to determine what might be best for you.
  • Following are a few main points to remember when creating an excellent resume: Your resume must be free of typographical and spelling errors. Resumes need to be clearly formatted, organized, and easy to read. Use formatting tools wisely and consistently. Remember that white space can be an effective tool to help guide your reader’s eye. Use key words and action verbs to describe your skills. You can get a word list on the career web page or you can pick up a handout in the career center. We recognize that students have a wide variety of experiences they’d like to appear on a resume. Unfortunately, you may find that you do not have room for everything. In most cases a recent college graduate entering the work force will have a one page resume. Resumes over a page are acceptable for more seasoned candidates. If you have additional relevant information to share with an employer, you may wish to include it in a cover letter or discuss the experience with an employer in the context of an interview.
  • As you might imagine, employers receive a large number of resumes. Many employers glance at resumes for a short period of time –sometimes only 15 to 30 seconds, and make a decision about screening a candidate in or out. That being the case, it’s important that your resume be easy to read, concise, and professional. There are a couple of things you can do to present your resume in a clear, concise manner: Leave margins. More specifically, you may wish to create top/bottom and left/right margins that are parallel. Blank space will help create a balanced look. Use the standard font type and size –such as “Times New Roman” or “Arial” and 10-14 point font. Consistent use of bold typeface, italics, underlining, bullets and indentations enhances the presentation of your resume and creates an easier read.
  • Some typical resume categories are: Contact Information An objective Education Awards/Honors Work Experience/Internship Experience Additional skills such as computer skills Languages Community Service/Volunteer work Activities and Interests Every resume will not have all of these categories.
  • The following slides will provide some examples of information that might be contained in each of the previously mentioned resume categories…
  • Your contact information should appear at the top of the page. Include your name, address, zip code, telephone numbers, and e-mail address. You may list a single address or both a permanent and current address.
  • The objective appears near the top of your resume and tells the reader about your career goals and/or expresses interest in a specific job or vacancy.  The objective gives direction and focus to your resume.  The objective can include: field/industry type position skills offered short-term or long-term goals Remember-Everything in the resume should support your purpose You may have different resumes with different objectives depending on the positions you are applying for.
  • Avoid objectives that are either too narrow or too broad. A strong objective can indicate what you’ll be giving, just as much as what you’ll be getting and can also indicate focus and “fit” to a prospective employer.
  • Samples of good objectives would state something like this: Seeking an internship in public relations. An entry level position as a retail merchandise analyst. A position in retail merchandising in which a strong educational background and analytical skills will be required.
  • As you apply for internships or entry level positions, one of your key credentials is your St. Thomas education, so this information should appear next on your resume. The Education section will include the college where you received a degree, degree information, enrollment dates, and details about your academic program of study, and possibly GPA. Study abroad experiences and any additional certification and licensures may also be included. When listing courses, be certain to not provide a laundry list of courses and to simply choose the ones that are most relevant. A final comment about the Education section: List education in reverse chronological order.  Current students and recent graduates should list education before experience.  If you have significant work experience, list education at the end of the resume.  It is not necessary for a college graduate to list high school education. 
  • The largest section of your resume will be the Experience section. You may include full and part-time work experience, volunteer work, and internships. Remember it is not essential to list all of your experience. You may choose not to list some positions due to either space constraints or the fact that some of your experience is not relevant to the positions you are seeking. List your present or most recent employment first. Include job title, employer name, location, and dates of employment.
  • Describe duties performed and include previous titles, when necessary, to show growth within an organization. Some of the headings for this section include: &amp;quot;Experience&amp;quot;, &amp;quot;Work Experience&amp;quot;, &amp;quot;Employment&amp;quot;, &amp;quot;Professional Experience“ or “Related Employment.” You may have other preferred titles. List your experiences in chronological order beginning with the most recent first. Use action verbs to describe each of your responsibilities and accomplishments and prioritize bullets to reflect the level of responsibility.
  • In addition to your internships and part-time jobs, you may also want to highlight your leadership roles, extra-curricular activities, and volunteer experiences. You may list on-campus memberships volunteer groups and elected positions. Choose those activities which demonstrate skills supporting your objective and which present you as a well-rounded and versatile individual. By presenting your activities as part of your resume, employers will see you as someone who gets involved.
  • Other resume categories to include could be: Computer Languages and technical skills. If you list a language(s), you must specify your skill level in the language. Keep in mind that if you list a language, it’s fair game –an employer can dialogue with you in that language. One final note about this section. Occasionally, students title this section “Skills and Interests” and include information about their interests such as hobbies, travel and volunteer experiences.. In listing your interests, try to select interests that help the employer gain a better understanding of you as a person.
  • REFERENCES Instead of cluttering your resume with this information regarding references, put them on a separate sheet.  Use the same paper as your resume and indicate that it is your reference list.  This can be done by putting your name, address and telephone number at the top of the page just as it appears on your resume; write the word, “REFERENCES” before you begin presenting the names and contact information for your references. When providing references to a prospective employer, make sure that you provide information that would be included on the person’s business card.  This includes the reference’s name, title, organization, complete address and telephone number of the individual serving as the reference.  Fax numbers and e-mail addresses are optional.  If you use a title (Dr., Mr., Mrs., Rev., etc.) for one reference, be consistent for all references.  List all references in alphabetical order by last name.  You may also  include a brief statement explaining your professional relationship to the reference.    Before including someone as a reference, make sure that you contact the person and ask if he/she would be willing to serve as a reference for you.  Also, make sure that you keep your references informed about your job search.
  • Some final items to remember when putting together your resume: There is no perfect resume – only great works in progress There is no “exact recipe” – only traditions &amp; guidelines Keep your language concise, crisp &amp; clear Provide concrete evidence and When in doubt, ask “does it support my purpose?”
  • (continued) Check for grammatical, spelling &amp; typing errors Critique! Critique! Critique! Ask friends, advisors, faculty, Career counselors to provide feedback on your resume and if you are mailing a hard copy , use a laser printer on resume paper.
  • Once you have developed a resume draft, you can make an appointment at the Career Development Center, to have a one-on-one consultation, or you may choose to come in during our pop-in/drop-in hours for a critique. Please call ahead for times and scheduling.
  • Additional resources available to help you develop a resumes include: Handouts on line and in the Career Center office, the career website, audio guides and books.
  • We would appreciate your feedback about this online workshop. Please take minute to complete our short survey. Thank you! Please contact our office for any career related question you may have.
  • Resume Webinar

    1. 1. WELCOME Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 www.stthomas.edu/careerdevelopment © 2007 UST Career Development Center
    2. 2. Resume Writing Career Development Center University of St. Thomas © 2007 UST Career Development Center
    3. 3. Resume Writing <ul><li>What is a resume? </li></ul><ul><li>When is it used? </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    4. 4. Before getting started… <ul><li>Remember: A resume is your own personal selling tool! It is a personal reflection of YOU! </li></ul><ul><li>You have options when writing a resume, be thoughtful and look at samples of other resumes to determine what might be best for you. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    5. 5. What makes an excellent resume? <ul><li>Free of typographical and spelling errors </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly formatted, organized, and easy to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Using key words and action verbs. </li></ul><ul><li>One-two page(s) in length (Recent grads typically should have one page resumes. Resumes over a page are acceptable by more seasoned professionals). </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    6. 6. What makes an excellent resume? continued <ul><li>Margins </li></ul><ul><li>Font type/style </li></ul><ul><li>Format-bullets and indentations </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    7. 7. Typical Resume Categories <ul><li>Contact Information </li></ul><ul><li>Objective </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Awards/Honors </li></ul><ul><li>Work Experience/Internship Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Skills (Computer) </li></ul><ul><li>Languages </li></ul><ul><li>Community Service/Volunteer work </li></ul><ul><li>Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Interests </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    8. 8. <ul><li>The following slides will provide some examples of information that might be contained in each of the previously mentioned resume categories… </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    9. 9. Resume Categories: Identification <ul><li>Name </li></ul><ul><li>Addresses </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail </li></ul><ul><li>Phone number with area code </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center Kelly B. Goode 1314 Mockingbird Lane St. Paul, MN 55104 (651) 962-7777 [email_address]
    10. 10. Resume Categories : Objective <ul><li>Tells the reader the focus of the candidate’s search </li></ul><ul><li>Can include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>field/industry type </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>position </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>skills offered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>short-term or long-term goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remember-Everything in the resume should support your purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You may have different resumes with different objectives depending on the positions you are applying for. </li></ul></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    11. 11. A strong objective <ul><li>Indicates what you’ll be giving, just as much as what you’ll be getting. </li></ul><ul><li>Can also indicate focus and ‘fit’ to a prospective employer. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    12. 12. Samples of good OBJECTIVES : <ul><li>Seeking an internship in public relations. </li></ul><ul><li>An entry level position as a retail merchandise analyst. </li></ul><ul><li>A position in retail merchandising in which a strong educational background and analytical skills will be required. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    13. 13. Resume Categories : Education <ul><li>Name and location of university. </li></ul><ul><li>Type of degree (BA, BSBA, BS, MBA, etc.)   </li></ul><ul><li>Graduation date or the expected date of completion. </li></ul><ul><li>Major(s), Minor(s), Certificate(s), or areas of emphasis/concentration. </li></ul><ul><li>GPA (generally, list 3.0 GPA or above). </li></ul><ul><li>Additional certification or licenses. </li></ul><ul><li>Relevant coursework (optional). </li></ul><ul><li>Honors and Activities-(as they relate to your college life) </li></ul><ul><li>Study Abroad </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center University of St. Thomas St. Paul, MN B.A., Major: Communication Minor: Business Administration Graduation: May 2008 GPA: 3.2 Honors and Activities: Elected Finance Chair of Communication Club Member Varsity Soccer Team Orientation Group Leader
    14. 14. Resume Categories : Experiences © 2007 UST Career Development Center <ul><li>This may include </li></ul><ul><ul><li>full-time employment, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>work-study positions, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>summer employment, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>internships, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>volunteer experience, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>community service, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>student teaching, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>campus leadership, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>or any area in which you may have significant experience or knowledge, such as publications and presentations.  </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You may divide this category between Career Related Experience, Professional Experience, and Other Work Experience.  </li></ul>Kinko’s St. Paul, MN Customer Service Associate January, 2006-present Assisted customers with computer and copy machine questions. Resolved customer complaints as necessary. Trained new service associates. Reconciled register drawers. Deposited cash and checks from daily sales.
    15. 15. Briefly describe for each position: <ul><li>Job title, dates of employment, name of organization/company, and locations (city, state). </li></ul><ul><li>List your responsibilities (and level of responsibility) for each position using a variety of action verbs to describe situations and achievements.  </li></ul><ul><li>Remember to highlight accomplishments, experience gained, or skills acquired in your job, rather than recite your job description. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center FuncorpCentral West St. Paul, MN Marketing Intern May, 2007-August, 2007 -Performed store demonstrations of company’s birthday party products for ten retail locations. -Communicated with store personnel and parents on safe use of toys and balloons. -Built positive relationships with storeowners. -Completed and submitted reports within one day of events.
    16. 16. Components of a Resume: Activities <ul><li>List any on campus clubs, memberships, elected positions, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Choose those activities which sustain and demonstrate skills supporting your objective. </li></ul><ul><li>Present you as a well-rounded and versatile individual. </li></ul><ul><li>Employers will see you as someone who gets involved. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center Member of University of St. Thomas Communications Club Student Member of MN Chapter of Public Relations Society of America Elected Public Relations Representative for Student Government
    17. 17. Resume Categories :Other <ul><li>Computer skills/technical </li></ul><ul><li>Languages </li></ul><ul><li>Travel </li></ul><ul><li>Interest/Hobbies </li></ul><ul><li>International/Abroad Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer Experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Honors/Awards </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    18. 18. Components of a Resume: References <ul><li>References Available Upon Request </li></ul><ul><li>You can include “References available upon request” on your resume if space permits. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not actually list references on your resume. </li></ul><ul><li>Whether on your resume or not, you should have at least three references available to employers. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure to ask references whether they are willing to serve as a reference for you and their preferred method of contact </li></ul><ul><li>If requesting a letter, allow time for it to be written. </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    19. 19. Putting It All Together… Things to Remember <ul><li>There is no perfect resume – only great works in progress </li></ul><ul><li>There is no “exact recipe” – only traditions & guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Keep your language concise, crisp & clear </li></ul><ul><li>Provide concrete evidence </li></ul><ul><li>When in doubt, ask “does it support my purpose?” </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    20. 20. Putting It All Together Final Details <ul><li>Check for grammatical, spelling & typing errors </li></ul><ul><li>Critique! Critique! Critique! </li></ul><ul><li>Laser print on resume paper </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    21. 21. Next Steps… Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 Make an appointment or come to pop-in/walk-in hours for additional help or questions. 2007UST Career Development Center
    22. 22. Additional Resources <ul><li>Handouts </li></ul><ul><li>Website </li></ul><ul><li>Audio Guides </li></ul><ul><li>Books in Resource Center </li></ul><ul><li>Walk-in critique with draft </li></ul>© 2007 UST Career Development Center
    23. 23. THANK YOU Career Development Center 350 Herrick Hall 651-962-6761 http://www.stthomas.edu/careerdevelopment/ © 2007 UST Career Development Center
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