• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
U.S. Navy Family Readiness Groups and Facebook (Feb 2010: links and data may be outdated)
 

U.S. Navy Family Readiness Groups and Facebook (Feb 2010: links and data may be outdated)

on

  • 3,711 views

This is a snapshot compiled by the Dept. of the Navy Office of Information to summarize the use of social media, in particular Facebook, by Family Readiness Groups and OMBUDSMEN with recommended ...

This is a snapshot compiled by the Dept. of the Navy Office of Information to summarize the use of social media, in particular Facebook, by Family Readiness Groups and OMBUDSMEN with recommended approachs.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,711
Views on SlideShare
3,703
Embed Views
8

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
58
Comments
0

1 Embed 8

http://www.slideshare.net 8

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    U.S. Navy Family Readiness Groups and Facebook (Feb 2010: links and data may be outdated) U.S. Navy Family Readiness Groups and Facebook (Feb 2010: links and data may be outdated) Presentation Transcript

    • SOCIAL MEDIA SNAPSHOT FAMILY READINESS GROUPS:  Reaching Family Members through Facebook
    • There are several thing we know about the current state of  social media use for Navy families • Navy family members use social media (stay in touch with Sailors, receive Navy  news, and search for other resources)  • Family/Sailors gravitate to sites that are most relevant to their lives. Participation  most often occurs on the social media site closest to their assigned command.  • Command Leadership interaction in this environment typically generates positive  feedback and is essential to improve understanding through maintaining effective  two‐way communication. • Family members/Veterans/Sailors tend to create their own presence within social  media to “fill the void” when units do not do so effectively. • Social Media greatly decreases the isolation felt by family members outside the  command’s immediate geographical location and build stronger ties for more  extended family • Family members support each other through Facebook pages offering guidance  and resources amongst each other We’ve seen 4 different approaches of Family  Readiness Groups using Facebook…
    • 1.  Family Readiness Facebook FAN page EXAMPLE: USS Bonhomme Richard Family Readiness  Group Benefits: •Easily accessed through links •Offers various applications to support shared information  and discussion •Same platform we are encouraging to be used by  commands as official Facebook presences •Updates appear in fans’ “Newsfeed” making information  easier to share and peeking interest Share photos, Plan  events Downsides: •Open to general public •Personal/OPSEC risks increase with openness of site •Potentially disconnected from Command page and  messages •Splits audience with Command presence on Facebook
    • 2.  Family Readiness Facebook GROUP page EXAMPLE: USS Nimitz Family Support Page Benefits: •Selected membership, more private approach   •Can easily send inbox messages to group followers with  updates/events/discussion topics Downsides: •Not as many application and limited on what can be  populated to the page •Must be a member to access it and some family members  might be hesitant to request membership •Updates do not appear in followers’ “Newsfeed” and  people have a tendency to forget to go back and look at  Group pages •You cannot link to Group pages. They must be found by  searching •Can appear exclusive and/or uninviting to new family  members that must request to join
    • 3. Ombudsman Facebook Profile EXAMPLE: NAS Pensacola & Naval Hospital Bremerton Benefits • Can use the ombudsman email address to create a  profile that will transfer to the new ombudsman  when transitions occur • Can send the ombudsman a message privately or  write on the wall for all to see Downsides • Violates Facebook’s Terms of Service if you have  multiple profiles – runs the risk of being taken  down • Cannot create events or host discussions on  separate tabs of page • You have to be a friend of the ombudsman in order  to see information and comment • If new ombudsman does not want to use Facebook,  the page could go dormant and confuse family  members
    • 4. Ombudsman/FRG Admin access to  COMMAND’s Facebook Fan page EXAMPLE: USS Normandy Benefits: •OMBUDSMAN can assist ship PAO with posting  while ship is at sea •Family Members/Sailors don’t have to split their  time btwn  2 pages •Both the command and FRG have “eyes” on the  page  •Questions can be addressed more quickly by the  appropriate Facebook Admin (OMBUDSMAN/Ship  PAO Downsides: •Open to the public h ch •The various information being posted could  Ap A proac pproa confuse the audience me nded ended Re R comm ecom •Potential problems if unit leadership and FRG  disagree on tone/voice of page
    • Key to success: Responsive participation by leadership • Participation by Commanding Officer  is essential for success • Official Command social media sites  are viewed by family members as a  direct communication link to the unit • Command leadership should use  open format to most effectively  understand, respond and manage  expressed interests 
    • Key to success: Leveraging multiple Navy social network  presences supports Unit‐level engagement EXAMPLE: MCPON CHINFO OI‐54 and MCPON PAO recently created a distro of Navy Social Media  administrators that run pages with large family member audiences so that when MCPON has a  particular family message to get out it can be emailed to the distro and re‐populated on all  s appropriate Navy sites to reach the largest audience t hi in ite ins r s Lyk ou T e y ail L l ud m i nc o, e To istr d
    • Key to success: Engage with other sites targeted towards Family  Readiness and support • NavyforMoms.com • NavyDads.com • Command Website with FRG info posted • Designated Website for FRG  • Twitter Lists relevant to command • Individually started social media sites
    • Recommendation: FRGs should maintain at least one social media  presence in sync with command social media properties to: • Make family readiness information easily findable and accessible to all Navy family members,  where they are already communicating actively • Connect Family Readiness Group Leaders/Ombudsmen with Unit Commanders to demonstrate a  united front using social media best practices and lessons learned • Use existing and proven sites to build discussion and allow families to support each other  asynchronously with resources and information • Be positioned and prepared to meaningfully respond to feedback/questions/concerns that arise  through the open communication architecture • Build sense of community among Navy families through sharing of photos, videos, and online  connections with commands eliminating geographical limitations  ADDITIONAL TIPS ADDITIONAL TIPS •Submit Social Media sites to Navy Social Media directory at navy.mil •Submit Social Media sites to Navy Social Media directory at navy.mil •List all web‐based and in‐person Family Readiness Group resources in a  •List all web‐based and in‐person Family Readiness Group resources in a  central location to make resources easy to find by family members central location to make resources easy to find by family members •Provide consistent information across social media sites, unit websites and  •Provide consistent information across social media sites, unit websites and  other family readiness resources other family readiness resources