Trustee Training Overview

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Presentation by David L. Buhler, Utah Commissioner of Higher Education regarding the general state of higher education in Utah, an overview of the roles and responsibilities of Regents and Trustees, and a description of the budgetary process.

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Trustee Training Overview

  1. 1. Regent and Trustee Training David Buhler, Commissioner of Higher Education July 18, 2013
  2. 2. Higher Education Highlights 2
  3. 3. Student Enrollment (Fall 2012) 3 26,966 19,296 14,233 6,193 19,117 6,287 15,361 3,306 32,398 28,786 26,680 8,297 31,556 8,863 30,112 4,599 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 University of Utah Utah State University Weber State University Southern Utah University Utah Valley University Dixie State University Salt Lake Community College Snow College Budget Related FTE Headcount
  4. 4. At-a-glance 4 • Over 28,000 degrees awarded in 2012-13 academic year • USHE institutions employ over 33,000 Utahns • Lowest student debt in the nation • 2nd Lowest cost per completion nationally  Utah Educational Savings Plan (State’s 529) is consistently ranked among top 5 in the country
  5. 5. Research Universities •University of Utah (Flagship) – medical school, law school, pharmacy school, etc. •Utah State University (Land Grant) – includes regional campuses Regional Universities •Weber State University •UtahValley University •Southern Utah University (Liberal Arts & Sciences) •Dixie State University Community Colleges •Snow College •Salt Lake Community College Utah’s Eight Public Colleges & Universities
  6. 6. $19,316 $26,355 $30,632 $41,273 $59,843 Less than High School Diploma High School Diploma Some College, Certificates & Associate's Degrees Bachelor's Degree Graduate Degree 8.2% 7.6% 5.5% 4.1% 1.4% Benefits of a Higher Education 6 Median Wage Unemployment Rate Sources: American Communities Survey 2011, Utah Department of Workforce Services
  7. 7. 7 12% 40% 48% 34% 38% 28% No Postsecondary Education Some College, Certificates & Associate's Degrees Bachelor's & Higher Taxes Paid Population Utah Population (25 & over) by education level & state tax contribution State investment benefits state revenues
  8. 8. The Big Challenge 8
  9. 9. How do we maintain quality and access (including affordability)? Investment & Innovation 9
  10. 10. Since 2008: • Annual tax funding per full-time students has decreased $1,754. • With tuition, total annual funding per full-time student has decreased $642. State support is central to affordability FY 2008 Tax Funds 63% Tuition 37% FY 2013 Tax Funds 49% Tuition 51% Funding per FTE
  11. 11. Since 2008: • Annual tax funding per full-time students has decreased $1,754. • With tuition, total annual funding per full-time student has decreased $642. State support is central to affordability FY 2008 Tax Funds 63% Tuition 37% FY 2013 Tax Funds 49% Tuition 51% FY 2023 Tax Funds 38% Tuition 62% Funding per FTE
  12. 12. 12 All States Have Cut Back Support -10% -5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 2011 ANNUAL PERCENT CHANGE IN HIGHER EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS, FY1960-2012 – U.S.
  13. 13. Utah has cut back less than most 13Sources: State Higher Education Executive Officers (http://sheeo.org/sites/default/files/publications/SHEF%20FY%2012-20130322rev.pdf) College Board (http://trends.collegeboard.org/college-pricing/figures-tables/state-tuition-and-fees-state-and-sector-over-time) 71% 36% 53% 34% 65% 83% 51% 38% 47% 51% 29% 64% 47% 66% 35% 17% 49% 62% 53% 49% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Colorado Nevada Arizona Arkansas Virginia Vermont Massachusetts Florida Tennessee Utah Tuition per FTE State/Local Appropriation per FTE 2012-13Tuition (4-yr institution) $5,595 $7,676 $6,232 $10,619 $13,582 $9,907 $6,968 $9,729 $6,371 $8,416 Tuition vs. State/Local Appropriation
  14. 14. 14 • By 2020 66% of jobs in Utah will require a college education • Only 43% of Utahns currently have some sort of college education • If 66% of Utahns get a college degree or certificate by 2020, state GDP would increase 5-10% annually…$600 billion over 30 years Investment: the Big Goal of 66%
  15. 15. We’re headed the wrong direction Source: Georgetown Center on Education and theWorkforce 15 • Among US adults 65 & older, Utah ranks 6th in associate’s degree or higher • Among US adults age 25-34, Utah ranks 23rd • Between 1994 and 2009 Utah’s youth (18-24) population grew by 40%, while first time freshmen enrollment grew by 20%
  16. 16. 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 2012-13 2022-23 10-year projected student enrollment 29% Increase With Growth, Capacity is an Issue 16
  17. 17. Limited Capacity – Academic Infrastructure • Sufficient personnel and faculty to maintain degree quality • Higher Education competes nationally for quality talent – Physical Infrastructure • Enrollment increases further constrain space • Significant utilities infrastructure • Growing backlog of deferred maintenance – Virtual Infrastructure • Keeping pace with rapid pace of technological change – Online, “flipped” classrooms, open source, MOOCs • Helps with capacity, still carries a cost 17
  18. 18. 18 …some examples 4-fold Increase in distance-delivered courses in past 10 yrs. 1 in 5 Students take an online course 2/3 Of all students participate in some form of technology-based instruction 49 Degrees/certificates available entirely online (12 Master’s degrees)
  19. 19. State investment is critical for our future  Encourages college preparation  Helps keep college affordable/accessible for Utahns A well-educated workforce is critical for future generations 19
  20. 20. Higher Education Boards 20
  21. 21. Individual Characteristics • Influential citizens • Appointed by the Governor • Each have a responsibility to support and promote higher education as a whole and USHE. • Trustees also have specific responsibilities for their own institution 21
  22. 22. Helpful Hints • Recognize and respect the difference between policy and administration – Example: • Appropriate: What are the strategies to encourage more students to successful transition from developmental math to math 1050? • Inappropriate: Who is teaching remedial math, or how are they teaching it, or where or when is it taught? • Presidents are responsible for the management and leadership of their institutions including personnel 22
  23. 23. Helpful Hints • Only the Board Chair or CEO (President or Commissioner) speak for the Board, not individual board members • Chair or President/Commissioner are responsible for making sure their comments on behalf of the board reflect the full or majority of the board • Any issues with other board members or the President/Commissioner should be raised with the Chair • Publicly show support for the decisions of the Board, the President/Commissioner – “Privately advise, publicly support” 23
  24. 24. Board Member Expectations 24 • Be informed generally on higher education and other high profile policy & community issues • Come to meetings prepared – Read materials – Be ready to offer feedback and make decisions • Keep confidences
  25. 25. Board of Regents 25 Selection & Retention of Presidents Selection & Retention of Presidents Policy Leadership Policy Leadership Program Approval Program Approval Budget & Facilities Oversight Budget & Facilities Oversight Boards of Trustees (Governor appointed) Commissioner of Higher Education Institution Presidents
  26. 26. • Approve: – Program approval for new degrees and certificates (by vote) and other curriculum/program items (by General Consent after staff review) – All tuition and fees – Appointment and evaluation of Presidents • Trustees have major role – Budget and Capital Facility recommendations – Property transactions over a certain amount – Statewide policies Board of Regents - Highlights 26
  27. 27. • Act with President to ensure effective operations of the institutions • Statutory responsibility for – Community Communications – Fundraising – Planning – Alumni Relations – Honorary Degrees • Provides preliminary approval and oversight on issues going to the Board of Regents (second tier tuition, academic programs, property transactions, etc.) Board of Trustees 27 8 appointed by Governor Student Body President Alumni Association President
  28. 28. • Presidential Searches with Board of Regents • Assist Regents with Performance Evaluation of Presidents • Approve Institutional policies • Implement statewide policies • Master Planning • Review and Approval Before Board of Regents – 2nd tier tuition – New programs/degrees & certificates and other items – Capital facility requests – Property transactions • Internal Audit • Consults and provides advice to presidents on auxiliaries and athletics, investments, property, etc. Board of Trustees - Highlights 28
  29. 29. • Trustee Chair is Vice Chair of the Search Committee • Equal number of Regents and Trustees on Search Committee • Final candidates to meet with Trustees along with other constituent groups • Trustee Executive Committee to participate in finalist interviews and Board deliberations Board of Trustees – Presidential Searches 29
  30. 30. As part of Resource & Review Team • 4 members (Trustee Chair and Vice-chair, 2 Regents) • Become familiar and assist Presidents – Regents get deeper understanding of specific institutions – 2 Meetings per year (Spring & Fall) • Assists Regents with Performance Evaluation of Presidents – Informal evaluation (Spring of each year) • Compensation increase requires positive evaluation – Formal evaluations are on a schedule every few years • Trustees are consulted • Presidents share institutional highlights in the Fall R&R Board of Trustees – Working with R&R Team 30
  31. 31. • CEO of the institution responsible for academic quality and financial management • “Face” of the institution—communication with public, students, faculty, legislature, etc. • Works with the Council of Presidents and Commissioner as recommendations are developed for the Board of Regents, Legislature and Governor Presidents 31
  32. 32. Unified Budget Process 32
  33. 33. Board of Regents – Unified Budget Process 33 June- August Commissioner seeks input from Presidents on Priorities September Commissioner makes recommendations to Board of Regents for discussion, review and approval October Submit to Governor/Legislature November- December Governor forms statewide budget request December Legislature’s Executive Appropriations Committee establishes budget parameters
  34. 34. Board of Regents – Unified Budget Process 34 January- February Legislature’s Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee holds hearings, prioritizes recommendations to Executive Appropriations March Executive Appropriations Develops budget; Legislature approves March Governor signs/vetoes April/May Commissioner’s Office works with State Division of Finance to execute budget changes
  35. 35. Statutory Components of Unified Budget 35 Employee Compen- sation Cost of Living Increases Insurance Increases Mandatory Costs Operation and Maintenance Utilities Statewide and Institutional Priorities 2013 Examples: -University of Utah Medical School -Dixie State University Status -Regents’ Scholarship Unfunded Historic Growth Has not been funded since 2002 Mission Based Funding New Enrollment Growth 3 Strategic Priorities Equity
  36. 36. Mission Based Funding 36 Distinctive Mission • Completion • Participation • Economic Development Equity • Addresses funding inequities for institutions with similar missions New Enrollment Growth • Not requested in 2013 Institutions submit initiatives with defined outcomes, assessment criteria and budget plan that fit into these categories
  37. 37. Capital Development (Buildings) 37 State-funded projects • All or part are to be funded from state-appropriated and/or state general obligation (GO) bonds Non-state-funded projects • Entirely funded from non-state- funds • Including revenue bonds issued by USHE Both types of projects require Board of Regents and Legislative approval Both types of projects require Board of Regents and Legislative approval
  38. 38. Capital Development (Buildings) 38 May Building guidelines/scoring analysis established/refined by Board of Regents June-July Institutions submit project proposals, projects scored September Regents task force makes recommendations to Board of Regents for prioritization September- October Prioritized projects sent to State Building Board for prioritization with other state funded projects October Governor prioritizes building proposals in Governor’s Budget Recommendations January Legislative Infrastructure and General Government Committee recommends priorities to Legislature February- March Considered by full legislature for final approval
  39. 39. A Special Thank You 39 Your public service is critical to the success of higher education in Utah
  40. 40. Questions/Discussion 40

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