Trustee Training - Academic Programs
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Trustee Training - Academic Programs

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Presentation by Associate Commissioner Elizabeth Hitch on academic governance (academic programs, academic tenure, etc.)

Presentation by Associate Commissioner Elizabeth Hitch on academic governance (academic programs, academic tenure, etc.)

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Trustee Training - Academic Programs Trustee Training - Academic Programs Presentation Transcript

  • Academic Governance and Policy in USHE Academic Governance and Policy in USHE Trustee and Regent “Summer Training” Retreat July 2013 Trustee and Regent “Summer Training” Retreat July 2013
  • Academic Affairs – Regents’ Policies (R400 – 499) Academic Affairs – Regents’ Policies (R400 – 499) • Program Approval and Review of Existing Programs • Major Program Areas • Public Colleges of Education and Centennial Schools • Career and Technical Education • Continuing Education and Community Service • Program Approval and Review of Existing Programs • Major Program Areas • Public Colleges of Education and Centennial Schools • Career and Technical Education • Continuing Education and Community Service
  • Academic Affairs – Regents’ Policies (R400 – 499) Academic Affairs – Regents’ Policies (R400 – 499) • Academic Standards, Access and Placement • Award or Transfer of Credit • Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility • Oversight • University Research Parks • Honorary Degrees • Academic Standards, Access and Placement • Award or Transfer of Credit • Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility • Oversight • University Research Parks • Honorary Degrees
  • Three Key Areas for Today Three Key Areas for Today  Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility  Academic Program Approval and Review  Transfer and Articulation of Courses and Programs  Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility  Academic Program Approval and Review  Transfer and Articulation of Courses and Programs
  • Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility
  • The Life-Long Commitment of a Faculty Member The Life-Long Commitment of a Faculty Member Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure(6yrs) Post-Tenure Emeritus
  • Underlying Philosophy of TenureUnderlying Philosophy of Tenure "Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition." American Association of University Professors' 1940 statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. "Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition." American Association of University Professors' 1940 statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure.
  • TenureTenure Recognizes a life-long commitment to scholarship. Ensures a pipeline of people willing to commit to a lifetime of scholarship with:  Protection from political forces  Protection from market forces  Protection from organizational changes AAUP statements (www.aaup.org) Utah Board of Regents (www.utahsbr.edu) UVU tenure policy (www.uvu.edu/policies/officialpolicy/policy/show/policyid/29) Recognizes a life-long commitment to scholarship. Ensures a pipeline of people willing to commit to a lifetime of scholarship with:  Protection from political forces  Protection from market forces  Protection from organizational changes AAUP statements (www.aaup.org) Utah Board of Regents (www.utahsbr.edu) UVU tenure policy (www.uvu.edu/policies/officialpolicy/policy/show/policyid/29)
  • Rank and Tenure PolicyRank and Tenure Policy  Defined by institutional departments  Guided by policy at Regent and institutional levels  Endorsed by dean, academic vice president, president and (depending upon the institution) by the Trustees  Is NOT forwarded to Regents  Defined by institutional departments  Guided by policy at Regent and institutional levels  Endorsed by dean, academic vice president, president and (depending upon the institution) by the Trustees  Is NOT forwarded to Regents
  • Tenure for FacultyTenure for Faculty  6-year probationary period (on average)  Reviews against departmental, college and university expectations throughout probation by departmental colleagues, other faculty, and administrators  Post-tenure review  6-year probationary period (on average)  Reviews against departmental, college and university expectations throughout probation by departmental colleagues, other faculty, and administrators  Post-tenure review
  • Rank (Titles and Progression Vary by Institution) Rank (Titles and Progression Vary by Institution) Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure (6yrs) Post Tenure Emeritus Instructor Master’s Degree with teaching specialty
  • RankRank Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure (6yrs) Post Tenure Emeritus Assistant Professor Apprentice scholar and teacher
  • RankRank Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure (6yrs) Post Tenure Emeritus Associate Professor Independent contributor
  • RankRank Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure (6yrs) Post Tenure Emeritus Professor (full) Senior scholar
  • RankRank Age 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 K-12 Undergrad(4 yrs) Masters(2 yrs) PhD(3-7yrs) Tenure (6yrs) Post Tenure Emeritus Emeritus Widespread reputation
  • Regent Policy on Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility Regent Policy on Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility  Provides structural outline and some basic expectations  Calls on Presidents to guide institutional processes  Provides structural outline and some basic expectations  Calls on Presidents to guide institutional processes
  • Regents’ Policy on Academic Freedom, Tenure, etc. (R481) Regents’ Policy on Academic Freedom, Tenure, etc. (R481) “The president of each institution, with the approval of the board of trustees, shall develop policies related to academic freedom, professional responsibility and tenure through a process which involves substantive participation of the faculty governance organization.” “The president of each institution, with the approval of the board of trustees, shall develop policies related to academic freedom, professional responsibility and tenure through a process which involves substantive participation of the faculty governance organization.”
  • Questions to AskQuestions to Ask  When reviewing departmental guidelines: Are the expectations for tenure and rank achievement clear?  When reviewing for tenure or rank advancement: Has the person met the expectations according to reviewers?  Are the prospects for long-term contributions of the faculty member good (tenure/post-tenure review)?  When reviewing departmental guidelines: Are the expectations for tenure and rank achievement clear?  When reviewing for tenure or rank advancement: Has the person met the expectations according to reviewers?  Are the prospects for long-term contributions of the faculty member good (tenure/post-tenure review)?
  • SabbaticalSabbatical •Major project/opportunity for renewal •May apply for as specified by institutional policy (seven years is typical) •Typical that it may be one semester at full pay or two semesters at a specified % •Review at all levels at the institution is usual (department, dean, VPAA, president, Trustees) •Major project/opportunity for renewal •May apply for as specified by institutional policy (seven years is typical) •Typical that it may be one semester at full pay or two semesters at a specified % •Review at all levels at the institution is usual (department, dean, VPAA, president, Trustees)
  • Questions to AskQuestions to Ask  Does the topic for the sabbatical enhance the teaching or research capabilities of the faculty member as judged by the institutional reviewers?  Are the outcomes of the sabbatical project clear?  Is funding available to support the sabbatical?  Does the topic for the sabbatical enhance the teaching or research capabilities of the faculty member as judged by the institutional reviewers?  Are the outcomes of the sabbatical project clear?  Is funding available to support the sabbatical?
  • Academic Program Approval and Review Academic Program Approval and Review
  • Academic Program Approval: Trustee and Regent Role Academic Program Approval: Trustee and Regent Role Balance the present institutional capacity and faculty expertise with the future needs of students, community and state. Balance the present institutional capacity and faculty expertise with the future needs of students, community and state. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • Typical Program Approval Process Typical Program Approval Process Department Proposal Academic Programs generally begin with an interest and an expertise at the departmental level. Community need may drive the interest.
  • Typical Program Approval Process Typical Program Approval Process Department Proposal School/ College Approval Curriculum Committee, Faculty Senate, and CAO President President’s CouncilTrustees OCHE Staff/CAOs/Regents’ Program Review Committee (PRC) Regents
  • Questions to AskQuestions to Ask  Is there a need?  Does the program fit within the school’s mission?  Is funding available to assure a quality program?  Are there adequate faculty (number and expertise)?  Are facilities adequate?  Are support services available?  Is transfer of students to and from the program within USHE facilitated by course and program articulation?  Is there a need?  Does the program fit within the school’s mission?  Is funding available to assure a quality program?  Are there adequate faculty (number and expertise)?  Are facilities adequate?  Are support services available?  Is transfer of students to and from the program within USHE facilitated by course and program articulation?
  • Observations on New ProgramsObservations on New Programs  Most ideas don’t make it very far  New programs balanced with removing programs (3-step process)  Some programs are conditional on funding from legislature  Legislature occasionally mandates programs  Most ideas don’t make it very far  New programs balanced with removing programs (3-step process)  Some programs are conditional on funding from legislature  Legislature occasionally mandates programs
  • Review of Existing ProgramsReview of Existing Programs  Three years after implementation  Ongoing (every seven years for universities and every five years for two-year colleges)  Critical to keeping institutional program array current, responsive, and within financial resources  Three years after implementation  Ongoing (every seven years for universities and every five years for two-year colleges)  Critical to keeping institutional program array current, responsive, and within financial resources
  • Questions to AskQuestions to Ask  Is program developing as projected (# of students, # and expertise of faculty). If not, is change in projection reasonable and worth continuing investment in the program?  Is program quality being maintained? (NOTE: Just because a program has been “on the books” for some time does not always mean it needs to remain “on the books.”)  Is program developing as projected (# of students, # and expertise of faculty). If not, is change in projection reasonable and worth continuing investment in the program?  Is program quality being maintained? (NOTE: Just because a program has been “on the books” for some time does not always mean it needs to remain “on the books.”)
  • Transfer and Articulation Transfer and Articulation
  • TRANSFER: A Key to Efficient Degree Completion TRANSFER: A Key to Efficient Degree Completion Goal: Move credits, courses, degrees seamlessly across USHE institutions Transfer works best with completion of Associate’s Degree or General Education Core and with articulation agreements at the program level Goal: Move credits, courses, degrees seamlessly across USHE institutions Transfer works best with completion of Associate’s Degree or General Education Core and with articulation agreements at the program level
  • Transfer: A Key to Efficient Degree Completion Transfer: A Key to Efficient Degree Completion  Over 30% of USHE students transfer  SWIRL is common: Students take courses from 1 or 2 other schools while fully matriculated  Over 30% of USHE students transfer  SWIRL is common: Students take courses from 1 or 2 other schools while fully matriculated
  • DIRECTIONS OF TRANSFERDIRECTIONS OF TRANSFER 2 → 4 2 → 2 4 → 4 4 → 2 2 → 4 2 → 2 4 → 4 4 → 2
  • Articulation of Courses and ProgramsArticulation of Courses and Programs  Assures courses are similar in content, rigor, and learning goals  Articulated courses are accepted across USHE institutions  All General Education courses articulate across USHE institutions  Articulated programs ensure all requirements are met efficiently  Assures courses are similar in content, rigor, and learning goals  Articulated courses are accepted across USHE institutions  All General Education courses articulate across USHE institutions  Articulated programs ensure all requirements are met efficiently
  • Award or Transfer of CreditAward or Transfer of Credit Regents’ Policy R470 General Education, Course Numbering, Lower division Pre-Major Requirements, Transfer of Credits and Credit by Examination Regents’ Policy R470 General Education, Course Numbering, Lower division Pre-Major Requirements, Transfer of Credits and Credit by Examination
  • Implementing PolicyImplementing Policy MAJORS’ MEETINGS  38 academic majors meet in 30 groups  On-going for 16 years Faculty share:  Syllabi  Expected competencies  Learning goals MAJORS’ MEETINGS  38 academic majors meet in 30 groups  On-going for 16 years Faculty share:  Syllabi  Expected competencies  Learning goals
  • How Do Students Know What Transfers? How Do Students Know What Transfers?  Academic Advisors  TransferUtah.org Guide (in final phases of testing)  UtahMajors.org Guide (online)  Institutional Websites  Academic Advisors  TransferUtah.org Guide (in final phases of testing)  UtahMajors.org Guide (online)  Institutional Websites
  • Three Key Areas for Today Three Key Areas for Today  Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility  Academic Program Approval and Review  Transfer and Articulation of Courses and Programs  Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibility  Academic Program Approval and Review  Transfer and Articulation of Courses and Programs
  • Questions?Questions?