U.S. Consumer Product Safety        Commission    CPSC Requirements for furniture, cribs and                children’s bed...
MissionProtecting the public against unreasonable  risks of injury from consumer products    through education, safety sta...
Four Types of Safety Concerns• Product fails to comply with a mandatory  safety standard or ban under the Acts• Product fa...
Product Hazard Prevention Strategies                        • Engaging in product safety                          system p...
CPSC Voluntary Standards                       Monitoring                                  Participate in                 ...
Voluntary Standard Development Organizations for Consumer ProductsANSI (American National Standards Institute)  – Motorize...
Voluntary Standards and RecallsIn some cases, failure to comply with a consensusvoluntary standard indicates to the CPSC t...
Technical RegulationsRegulatory process can be started by vote of theCommission or by a petition from an interested party ...
Furniture Requirements         Cribs
Crib Hazards• Strangulation and suffocation from  drop-side-related issues (hardware  failure, incorrect assembly)• Limbs ...
Crib Hazards• Inadequate wood strength• Inadequate mattress support• Incorrect mattress size• Paint and coating-related is...
Deaths Due toCrib Structural Failures
Deaths Due toCrib Structural Failures
CPSC Crib RegulationsThe CPSC issued new regulations forfull-size and non-full-size baby cribs andthird party testing. The...
CPSC Crib Regulations• Specific dimensions  −Interior dimensions  −Rail height• Spacing of crib components  −Distance betw...
CPSC Crib Regulations• Hardware  – Must prevent mechanical hazard  – Requires fastener/attachment hardware    locking devi...
CPSC Crib Regulations• Assembly instructions  – Complete  – Easy to understand• Identifying marks, warning statement  and ...
Crib Testing               18
Furniture Requirements    Toddler Beds
Toddler Bed Hazards• Entrapment• Broken, loose, or detached components• Product integrity issues  – Mattress support• Matt...
CPSC Toddler Bed Regulations• The CPSC issued new regulations for  toddler beds and procedures for third  party testing.• ...
CPSC Toddler Bed Regulations• References the ASTM standard F1821-09  Standard Consumer Safety Specification  for Toddler B...
CPSC Toddler Beds Regulations• New performance requirements for  spindle/slat strength of guardrails, side  rails, and end...
CPSC Toddler Beds Regulations
CPSC Toddler Bed RegulationsToddler beds that are converted fromfull-size cribs:  • Use spindle/slat testing in full-size ...
Furniture Requirements     Bunk Beds
CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsThe Commission regulates bunk beds toreduce the risk of death or injury tochildren from entrapmen...
CPSC Bunk Bed Hazards• Entrapment• Falls• Product integrity issues  – Mattress support
CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsGuardrails  • Must have at least two upper bunk    guardrails no less than 5 inches above    top ...
CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsGuardrails  • Guardrail on side away from wall    cannot have an opening greater than 15    inche...
CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsEnd Structures  • Top of each end must be at least 5    inches above top of mattress for at    le...
CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsEnd Structures  • Wedge block must not pass through    any opening in lower bunk unless the    op...
Bunk Bed Testing                   33
Furniture RequirementsUpholstered Furniture
Upholstered Furniture          (proposed regulation)• The Commission proposed a rule  addressing the risk of residential f...
Upholstered Furniture            (proposed regulation)• The proposed regulation primarily targets  the risk of fire associ...
Furniture and OSHA• The furniture used in a workplace is  regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety  and Health Administra...
State Regulatory Authorities and           Technical Regulations• In the United States, some states have laws  and regulat...
Responsibility to Comply with Voluntary   Standards and Technical Regulations             All equally responsible     Manu...
Importance of Using U.S. Technical Regulations           and Voluntary StandardsTo avoid entry problems with the U.S.gover...
How the CPSC Works with            ManufacturersDevelop guidance and help firms complywith the law through:• International...
Best Manufacturing PracticesManufacturers and importers should use bestpractices to ensure safe products enter into thecha...
Best Manufacturing Practices– Design safety into product. It is your  responsibility to work with the designer.– Control y...
Best Manufacturing Practices– To avoid problems, samples should be  tested randomly, early and often.– The cost of testing...
Best Manufacturing Practices
Contact Information              Dean W. Woodard, M.S.Director, Office of Education, Global Outreach, and           Small ...
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PROFECO Pro-Consumer Week: Requirements for furniture, cribs and toddler beds English

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Regulatory requirements for furniture, cribs, and toddler beds.

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  • CPSC supports continuous improvement to voluntary safety standards
  • Drop side detachments, mattress support collapse, slat detachment or breakage.Infants can became entrapped and strangle and suffocate when these types of crib failures occur.
  • a full-size crib is intended for use in the home, and a non-full-size crib is intended for use ‘‘in or around the home, for travel and other purposes.’’ A full-size crib has interiordimensions of 28 +- 5⁄8 inches (71 +- 1.6 centimeters) in width by 52 3⁄8 +- 5⁄8 inches (133+- 1.6 cms) in length. A non-full-size crib may be eithersmaller or larger than these dimensions.
  • The CPSC recently issued a new regulation for toddler beds which includes third-party testing requirements. The new rules became effective October 20, 2011. The regulation can be found in 16 CFR 1217.
  • The new regulation incorporates by reference ASTM voluntary standard F 1821-09 – Standard Consumer Safety Specifications for Toddler Beds, but also includes some staff changes. So, a manufacturer or importer of toddler beds, which includes regular toddler beds and convertible cribs that can be changed into toddler beds, must comply with this regulation as stated in 16 CFR 1217, not just ASTM F 1821-09. The regulation requires the upper edge of the guardrails to be at least 5 inches above the sleeping surface when a mattress of a thickness that is the maximum specified by the manufacturer’s instructions is used.Guardrails must be tested using a 50 lb force to make sure they do not break, detach, or create a condition that would present any of other potential hazardous situations discussed in the regulation.
  • The upper edge of the guardrail must be at least five inches above the toddler bed's mattress. Spindle/slat strength testing for toddler beds must be consistent with the testing required for crib spindles/slats. Separate warning labels to address entrapment and strangulation hazards must appear on toddler beds.
  • The upper edge of the guardrail must be at least five inches above the toddler bed's mattress. Spindle/slat strength testing for toddler beds must be consistent with the testing required for crib spindles/slats. Separate warning labels to address entrapment and strangulation hazards must appear on toddler beds.
  • There are some toddler beds that convert from full-size cribs. In those cases, the beds should already be tested to the full-size crib standard and, therefore, do not need to be tested again to toddler bed requirements that are duplications of the crib testing. The toddler bed standard specifically states that the spindle/slat testing used in the crib standard and the warning requirements from the crib standard are sufficient for the toddler beds. The standard is very clear where the testing overlaps, so make sure for convertible crib/toddler beds you follow both standards.
  • PROFECO Pro-Consumer Week: Requirements for furniture, cribs and toddler beds English

    1. 1. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC Requirements for furniture, cribs and children’s bedsThis presentation was prepared by CPSC staff, has not been reviewed or approved by, and may not reflect the views of, the Commission.
    2. 2. MissionProtecting the public against unreasonable risks of injury from consumer products through education, safety standards activities, regulation and enforcement.
    3. 3. Four Types of Safety Concerns• Product fails to comply with a mandatory safety standard or ban under the Acts• Product fails to comply with voluntary standards relied upon by the Commission• Product contains a defect which could create a “substantial product hazard”• Product creates an “unreasonable risk” of serious injury or death
    4. 4. Product Hazard Prevention Strategies • Engaging in product safety system processes by supporting improvements to voluntary standards/codes CPSC staff promotes • Creating and enforcingconsumer product safety } technical regulations and bansthrough a multi-pronged • Identifying and removing products with defects and approach hazards through surveillance activities and recalls • Developing education programs for consumers, importers, U.S. and foreign manufacturers, and retailers
    5. 5. CPSC Voluntary Standards Monitoring Participate in committees Propose Analyze standards injury/death development data for hazard or revisions patterns Conduct tests Review and evaluations standards for to support findings inadequaciesCPSC staff does not vote.
    6. 6. Voluntary Standard Development Organizations for Consumer ProductsANSI (American National Standards Institute) – Motorized Equipment – Lawn & Garden Equipment – Household Products – Safety LabelingASTM International – Children’s Products • Recreational ProductsUnderwriters Laboratories (UL) – Electrical and other products
    7. 7. Voluntary Standards and RecallsIn some cases, failure to comply with a consensusvoluntary standard indicates to the CPSC that aproduct contains a defect that presents a substantialproduct hazard. Example: These lights do not meet the voluntary Underwriters Laboratory (UL) standard due to insufficient wire size. They can overheat and pose a fire and shock risk. CPSC can seek a recall.
    8. 8. Technical RegulationsRegulatory process can be started by vote of theCommission or by a petition from an interested party CPSC statutes specify that voluntary standards should be relied upon. However, a regulation may be issued if: the current voluntary there is not standard does or substantial not adequately compliance. reduce the risk
    9. 9. Furniture Requirements Cribs
    10. 10. Crib Hazards• Strangulation and suffocation from drop-side-related issues (hardware failure, incorrect assembly)• Limbs caught between slats• Falls from cribs
    11. 11. Crib Hazards• Inadequate wood strength• Inadequate mattress support• Incorrect mattress size• Paint and coating-related issues
    12. 12. Deaths Due toCrib Structural Failures
    13. 13. Deaths Due toCrib Structural Failures
    14. 14. CPSC Crib RegulationsThe CPSC issued new regulations forfull-size and non-full-size baby cribs andthird party testing. The regulations wereeffective on June 28, 2011, formanufacturers, importers, and retailers.
    15. 15. CPSC Crib Regulations• Specific dimensions −Interior dimensions −Rail height• Spacing of crib components −Distance between components with and without an applied force
    16. 16. CPSC Crib Regulations• Hardware – Must prevent mechanical hazard – Requires fastener/attachment hardware locking devices• Construction and finishing – Wood components – Prevention of fall hazards
    17. 17. CPSC Crib Regulations• Assembly instructions – Complete – Easy to understand• Identifying marks, warning statement and compliance declaration – Identification of the manufacturer, importer, distributor, and/or seller – Cautionary language – Recordkeeping
    18. 18. Crib Testing 18
    19. 19. Furniture Requirements Toddler Beds
    20. 20. Toddler Bed Hazards• Entrapment• Broken, loose, or detached components• Product integrity issues – Mattress support• Mattress fit problems• Paint-related issues
    21. 21. CPSC Toddler Bed Regulations• The CPSC issued new regulations for toddler beds and procedures for third party testing.• The toddler bed regulations were effective on October 20, 2011.
    22. 22. CPSC Toddler Bed Regulations• References the ASTM standard F1821-09 Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Toddler Beds, with some changes: - Height requirement for guardrails - New performance test to address guardrail structural issues
    23. 23. CPSC Toddler Beds Regulations• New performance requirements for spindle/slat strength of guardrails, side rails, and end structures.• Changed warning labels to address entrapment and strangulation hazards separately.
    24. 24. CPSC Toddler Beds Regulations
    25. 25. CPSC Toddler Bed RegulationsToddler beds that are converted fromfull-size cribs: • Use spindle/slat testing in full-size crib standard (16 CFR § 1219) • Use warning required in section 8 of ASTM F1169-10 (incorporated by reference at 16 CFR § 1219)
    26. 26. Furniture Requirements Bunk Beds
    27. 27. CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsThe Commission regulates bunk beds toreduce the risk of death or injury tochildren from entrapment between anupper bunk and a wall, in openingsbelow guardrails, or in openings in theends of bunk beds.
    28. 28. CPSC Bunk Bed Hazards• Entrapment• Falls• Product integrity issues – Mattress support
    29. 29. CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsGuardrails • Must have at least two upper bunk guardrails no less than 5 inches above top of mattress • Guardrail on side next to wall must run full length to within 0.22 inches of end structure, if not attached to end structure
    30. 30. CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsGuardrails • Guardrail on side away from wall cannot have an opening greater than 15 inches between it and end structures • Wedge block must not pass through any spaces in or below guardrail
    31. 31. CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsEnd Structures • Top of each end must be at least 5 inches above top of mattress for at least half distance • Wedge block must not pass through any opening in upper bunk
    32. 32. CPSC Bunk Bed RegulationsEnd Structures • Wedge block must not pass through any opening in lower bunk unless the opening also permits passage of a 9- inch diameter sphere. • Openings that permit passage of sphere must be tested for neck entrapment.
    33. 33. Bunk Bed Testing 33
    34. 34. Furniture RequirementsUpholstered Furniture
    35. 35. Upholstered Furniture (proposed regulation)• The Commission proposed a rule addressing the risk of residential fires associated with cigarette and small open- flame ignitions of upholstered furniture.• Currently, CPSC staff is conducting research to validate or revise performance test methods and to respond to public comments.
    36. 36. Upholstered Furniture (proposed regulation)• The proposed regulation primarily targets the risk of fire associated with smoldering ignitions of upholstered furniture. – Proposal would require that manufacturers & importers use either: • Smolder-resistant upholstery coverings • Smolder-resistant and flame-resistant interior fire barriers
    37. 37. Furniture and OSHA• The furniture used in a workplace is regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), even if it is the same product used in a home.• Certain types of furniture may need to be tested and certified by an OSHA-recognized laboratory (NRTL) to meet the applicable safety test standard. For more information, go to: www.osha.gov/dts/otpca/nrtl/
    38. 38. State Regulatory Authorities and Technical Regulations• In the United States, some states have laws and regulations that are more strict than federal requirements. These laws include regulations for products, labeling, packaging, and chemical restrictions (e.g., flame retardant chemicals).• Your customer (importer) should know these requirements.
    39. 39. Responsibility to Comply with Voluntary Standards and Technical Regulations All equally responsible Manufacturers Distributors Retailers ImportersImporters, although reliant on foreign producers,are directly responsible for the safety of productsthey bring into the United States.
    40. 40. Importance of Using U.S. Technical Regulations and Voluntary StandardsTo avoid entry problems with the U.S.government (Customs and CPSC), foreignmanufacturers SHOULD comply with BOTH: – CPSC Regulations (mandatory) – Private Sector Standards (consensus voluntary standards)Both play essential safety roles.
    41. 41. How the CPSC Works with ManufacturersDevelop guidance and help firms complywith the law through:• International program outreach• Domestic manufacturer seminars• Participation at ICPHSO symposiums• Advice and guidance to trade associations and consultants
    42. 42. Best Manufacturing PracticesManufacturers and importers should use bestpractices to ensure safe products enter into thechain of commerce. – Importers/suppliers must work as a team. – Know where and how your product will be used. – Know and understand all requirements and standards. – Comply with consensus standards and technical regulations.
    43. 43. Best Manufacturing Practices– Design safety into product. It is your responsibility to work with the designer.– Control your supply chain (supply chain integrity).– Preventive action is better than corrective action.– Avoid long-term repercussions: Damage to Brand Name and “Made in My Country”.
    44. 44. Best Manufacturing Practices– To avoid problems, samples should be tested randomly, early and often.– The cost of testing is a tiny fraction of the costs associated with recalls and violations.– Seek products with third party certification.– Unauthorized component substitutions can easily lead to a recall.– Conduct spot inspections.
    45. 45. Best Manufacturing Practices
    46. 46. Contact Information Dean W. Woodard, M.S.Director, Office of Education, Global Outreach, and Small Business Ombudsman E-mail: Dwoodard@cpsc.gov Phone: 301-504-7651 Tilven M. Bernal Program Manager for the Western Hemisphere International Programs E-mail: Tbernal@cpsc.gov Phone: 301-504-7309
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