Youth Model History and Outlook              James Jongkind      American Honda Motor Co., Inc.  Chairman – SVIA Technical...
Youth Readiness ConsiderationsATV’s are not toys                                             All children  must           ...
ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1
Youth Categories of ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 1988 – Consent Decrees1990 – Y6 & Y12 1990 – Y6 & Y121998 – Consent Decrees expire2000  ...
ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2007Goal – no kids on adult modelsAction ‐ expand Y categoryMake more size and speed appropriate models av...
ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 20072007 – ANSI/SVIA ‐1 ‐2007 gets published2008– Financial crisis is occurring  2008 – CPSIA effectively ...
ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2007Several manufacturers and distributors withdrew from Several manufacturers and distributors withdrew f...
ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2010              Let’s resume what               we started in 2007September 2011  First test lab accredi...
ANSI/SVIA – 1 ‐ 2010What stakeholders can do to help:•   Encourage friends and families to spread the     word that kids o...
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ATV Safety Summit: Vehicle Characteristics/Other Rulemaking Topics - Youth Model History and Outlook

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James Jongkind, of American Honda Motor Co. and the Chairman of the SVIA Technical Advisory Panel, presented this at CPSC’s ATV Safety Summit Oct. 11, 2012. Whether children are ready to learn how to ride an ATV depends on a number of factors their parents must consider, including their age, physical size, strength, coordination, visual perception, and emotional maturity, as well as their ability to reason and make good decisions. Of these, the child’s age and size may be the most basic considerations, yet ones that too often are overlooked or ignored, particularly when selecting the appropriate ATV to ride, in disregard of the most predominant safety warnings present on ATVs. For many years parents and manufacturers alike were limited as to the youth ATV size options available to them. In 2007, the Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA) created new age categories (i.e. Y-10, T-14) intended to help address this concern. In this presentation, the Chair of the SVIA Technical Advisory Panel will review the new categories, the regulatory and economic challenges that have limited their availability and the important role that stakeholders can playing in increasing the number of youth riders on ATVs that are appropriate for their age, size, and abilities.

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ATV Safety Summit: Vehicle Characteristics/Other Rulemaking Topics - Youth Model History and Outlook

  1. 1. Youth Model History and Outlook James Jongkind American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Chairman – SVIA Technical Advisory Panel
  2. 2. Youth Readiness ConsiderationsATV’s are not toys All children  must  be supervised be supervised PHYSICAL SIZE REASONING/ MATURITY DECISION MAKING AGE STRENGTH COORDINATION VISUAL ATV’s handle  PERCEPTIONdifferently than other vehicles ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1
  3. 3. ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1
  4. 4. Youth Categories of ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 1988 – Consent Decrees1990 – Y6 & Y12 1990 – Y6 & Y121998 – Consent Decrees expire2000  Y6 & Y12 2000 – Y6 & Y122007 – Y6, Y10, Y12, T14 (Y12 expires 4 yrs later)2010 – Y6, Y10, Y12, T14 (Reintroduction of Y‐12) , , , ( )
  5. 5. ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2007Goal – no kids on adult modelsAction ‐ expand Y categoryMake more size and speed appropriate models available that are attractive to kids and their are attractive to kids and theirparents/caregiversCPSC (Commissioner Moore) CPSC (C i i M )suggested “a transitional model geared toward larger children who are not yet ready for an adult model”
  6. 6. ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 20072007 – ANSI/SVIA ‐1 ‐2007 gets published2008– Financial crisis is occurring  2008 – CPSIA effectively bans Y‐6 & Y‐10 models Unintended consequence of statute language  Unintended consequence of statute language mandates compliance with 600ppm lead limit 300ppm and 100ppm on the horizon  Market and regulatory factors force downsizing  and reduction in new model development
  7. 7. ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2007Several manufacturers and distributors withdrew from Several manufacturers and distributors withdrew fromthe market and many dealers lost their businesses Effective ban on Y‐6 & Y‐10 models and expiration of the Y‐12+ category created risk of children age 12 to 15 riding adult models  idi d lt d lImperative to maintain the Y‐12+ category 
  8. 8. ANSI/SVIA ‐ 1 ‐ 2010 Let’s resume what  we started in 2007September 2011  First test lab accredited (16CFR 1420)September 2011 – First test lab accredited (16CFR 1420) August 2011 – H.R. 2715 enacted d
  9. 9. ANSI/SVIA – 1 ‐ 2010What stakeholders can do to help:• Encourage friends and families to spread the  word that kids only ride age appropriate models  and only when supervised by a parent or  responsible adult• Help and support any effort to raise awareness  H l d t ff t t i• Coordinate public and private resources to reach  larger audience larger audience• Request state representatives to adopt SVIA  model legislation or support Federal model  g pp legislation
  10. 10. Thank You
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