Class 1b: Introduction to maps
What  is  a map? <ul><li>A generalized view of an area, usually some portion of Earth’s surface, as seen from above at a g...
Why make maps? <ul><li>To represent a larger area than we can see </li></ul><ul><li>To show a phenomenon or process we can...
Represent a larger area
Show what we can’t see
Present info concisely
Show spatial relationships
How do we read maps? <ul><li>Maps are  selective  views of reality </li></ul><ul><li>Size of the map relative to reality (...
Map scale <ul><li>Ratio of the distance on the map to the distance on the ground </li></ul><ul><li>Scale is a fraction </l...
 
Large-scale Small-scale
Map scale <ul><li>Ratio of the distance on the map to the distance on the ground </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic: </li></ul><ul>...
Map scale <ul><li>Verbal: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 inch equals 10 miles </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>E...
Map scale <ul><li>Representative fraction or ratio: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1:24,000 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></...
Map symbolization <ul><li>Symbols are a code instead of text </li></ul><ul><li>Three kinds: point, line, area </li></ul><u...
 
Point symbols <ul><li>Every symbol counts as one occurrence </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ind...
Indicate location Describe location
Show a distribution
Indicate a value
Line symbols <ul><li>One-dimensional </li></ul><ul><li>Mostly taken for granted (borders, roads) </li></ul><ul><li>Isoline...
 
Isolines (Contour lines)
Flow-line maps
Area symbols <ul><li>Each territory or region has one value </li></ul><ul><li>Differences in kind </li></ul><ul><li>Differ...
Differences in kind
Differences in kind
Differences in value (Choropleth)
Cartogram
Topographic maps <ul><li>Also called quadrangles </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 54,000 for the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Done by th...
Topographic maps <ul><li>Till the 1940s, you climbed to the highest point and plotted what you could see from there </li><...
Topographic maps <ul><li>Show 2D features, point, line and area; also show 3D via contour lines </li></ul><ul><li>Common s...
 
Map-reading exercise
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Class1b

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Class1b

  1. 1. Class 1b: Introduction to maps
  2. 2. What is a map? <ul><li>A generalized view of an area, usually some portion of Earth’s surface, as seen from above at a greatly reduced size </li></ul><ul><li>Any geographical image of the environment </li></ul><ul><li>A two-dimensional representation of the spatial distribution of selected phenomena </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why make maps? <ul><li>To represent a larger area than we can see </li></ul><ul><li>To show a phenomenon or process we can’t see with our eyes </li></ul><ul><li>To present information concisely </li></ul><ul><li>To show spatial relationships </li></ul>
  4. 4. Represent a larger area
  5. 5. Show what we can’t see
  6. 6. Present info concisely
  7. 7. Show spatial relationships
  8. 8. How do we read maps? <ul><li>Maps are selective views of reality </li></ul><ul><li>Size of the map relative to reality (scale) </li></ul><ul><li>What’s on the map (symbolization) </li></ul><ul><li>Shape of the map (projection) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Map scale <ul><li>Ratio of the distance on the map to the distance on the ground </li></ul><ul><li>Scale is a fraction </li></ul><ul><li>Larger area covered means larger denominator </li></ul><ul><li>Larger denominator means smaller fraction </li></ul><ul><li>So a large-scale map covers a small area </li></ul>
  10. 11. Large-scale Small-scale
  11. 12. Map scale <ul><li>Ratio of the distance on the map to the distance on the ground </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic: </li></ul><ul><li>Stays the same when photocopied </li></ul><ul><li>Might not be right for the whole map </li></ul>
  12. 13. Map scale <ul><li>Verbal: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 inch equals 10 miles </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Easy to understand </li></ul><ul><li>Can change if photocopied </li></ul>
  13. 14. Map scale <ul><li>Representative fraction or ratio: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1:24,000 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Units don’t matter </li></ul><ul><li>Can change if photocopied </li></ul>
  14. 15. Map symbolization <ul><li>Symbols are a code instead of text </li></ul><ul><li>Three kinds: point, line, area </li></ul><ul><li>Consider shape, size, orientation, pattern, color, value </li></ul>
  15. 17. Point symbols <ul><li>Every symbol counts as one occurrence </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Indicate location </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can also describe that location </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Quantitative points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show a distribution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indicate a value (graduated symbols) </li></ul></ul>
  16. 18. Indicate location Describe location
  17. 19. Show a distribution
  18. 20. Indicate a value
  19. 21. Line symbols <ul><li>One-dimensional </li></ul><ul><li>Mostly taken for granted (borders, roads) </li></ul><ul><li>Isolines connect same values </li></ul><ul><li>Flow-line maps indicate value by width of line </li></ul>
  20. 23. Isolines (Contour lines)
  21. 24. Flow-line maps
  22. 25. Area symbols <ul><li>Each territory or region has one value </li></ul><ul><li>Differences in kind </li></ul><ul><li>Differences in value </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choropleth maps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually, darker indicates more </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cartograms distort area to show value </li></ul>
  23. 26. Differences in kind
  24. 27. Differences in kind
  25. 28. Differences in value (Choropleth)
  26. 29. Cartogram
  27. 30. Topographic maps <ul><li>Also called quadrangles </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 54,000 for the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Done by the US Geological Survey (USGS) since 1897 </li></ul><ul><li>Map out the entire country in a standard fashion </li></ul>
  28. 31. Topographic maps <ul><li>Till the 1940s, you climbed to the highest point and plotted what you could see from there </li></ul><ul><li>Aerial photography after WWII </li></ul><ul><li>Two overlapping photos are put in a stereoscope </li></ul><ul><li>10 photos for each 7.5 minute map </li></ul>
  29. 32. Topographic maps <ul><li>Show 2D features, point, line and area; also show 3D via contour lines </li></ul><ul><li>Common symbols are in the appendix of the text </li></ul><ul><li>Note the contour interval at the bottom of the map </li></ul>
  30. 34. Map-reading exercise
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