Bullying Bryn
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    Bullying is a serious problem, and it's hard to deal with that situation, especially when it's your children because we want to protect them, and you don't want to see them hurt. We do the best we can as parents but aren't responsible for other's actions. Your doing everything you can for your kids, and that's all we can do.Yet, luckily, I read an article about like an on-star for phone that has been working perfectly for me and my family. With just a click of a button, you get conferenced with an emergency response agent, a list of people in your so called-safety network, and can even get escalated to the nearest 911. I read it from this article, http://Safekidzone.com/'
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  • 1. HRSA’s National Bullying Prevention Campaign Take A Stand. Lend A Hand. Stop Bullying Now! August, 2004
  • 2. Definition of Bullying
    • A child is being bullied when he/she is exposed, repeatedly and over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more children.
    • Bullying implies an imbalance in power or strength.
  • 3. Direct Bullying
    • Physical
    • Verbal
    • Non-verbal/ Non-physical
    • Hitting, kicking, shoving
    • Taunting, teasing, name calling
    • Threatening gestures
  • 4. Indirect Bullying
    • Physical
    • Verbal
    • Non-verbal/ Non-physical
    • Have a peer assault someone
    • Rumor-spreading, gossip
    • Exclusion, friendship manipulation, threatening e-mail
  • 5. Gender Differences
    • Most studies find that boys bully more than girls
    • Boys report being bullied by boys; girls are bullied by boys and girls
    • Boys are more likely than girls to be physically bullied by their peers
    • Girls are more likely to be bullied through rumor-spreading, sexual comments, social exclusion and social cruelty
  • 6. Conditions Surrounding Bullying
    • Children usually are bullied by one child or a small group
    • Common locations: playground, classroom, lunchroom, halls, bathrooms
    • Bullying is more common at school than on the way to/from school
  • 7. Prevalence/Harm
    • 30% of students reported moderate or frequent involvement in bullying (Nansel)
      • 19% report they bullied
      • 17% report being bullied
        • (6% report they both bullied and were bullied)
      • This translates to over 5 1/2 million youth
    • Involvement in bullying is correlated to violent and other anti-social behaviors (e.g., smoking, drinking alcohol, theft, possessing weapons, and poorer academic achievement)
  • 8. Bullying is Related To...
    • Vandalism
    • Fighting
    • Theft
    • Drinking of alcohol; smoking
    • Truancy, school drop-out
    • High-risk gun ownership
  • 9. Effects of Bullying on its Victims
    • Low self-esteem
    • Depression
    • Loneliness
    • Anxiety
    • School absenteeism
    • Reports of poorer general health
    • Migraine headaches
    • Suicidal ideation
  • 10. What Works?
    • What is required to reduce bullying in schools is nothing less than a change in the school climate and in norms for behavior .
    • This requires a comprehensive, school-wide effort involving the entire school community.
  • 11. Campaign History
    • Congressionally funded through the CDC’s National Youth Media Campaigns (2001)
    • Primary audience for all campaigns:
      • Tweens (youth aged 9 through 13)
  • 12. Leadership Team
    • HRSA
      • Elizabeth Duke, HRSA Administrator
      • Kay Garvey, Office of Communications Director
    • MCHB
      • Peter van Dyck, Associate Administrator
      • Stephanie Bryn, Project Officer
    • Widmeyer Communications
      • Jason Smith, Campaign contractor
    • Clemson University
      • Susan Limber, Campaign subcontractor & bullying prevention expert
  • 13. Campaign Goals:
    • Raise awareness about bullying
    • Prevent and reduce bullying behaviors
    • Identify appropriate interventions for tweens and other target audiences
    • Foster and enhance linkages between public health, education and other partners
  • 14. Campaign Timeline
    • Two years in development (01-03)
    • Launch: March, 2004
    • Telecast: April, 2004
    • view at www.mchcom.com
    • Phase 2~~~Sept. 2004
    • Updates, translation into Spanish,
    • T-TA, new webisodes, comic books
  • 15. Campaign Research
    • Environmental scan
    • Focus groups & in-depth interviews
    • Extensive involvement of our Youth Expert Panel
      • Diverse group of 20 tweens, 4 teens
      • 12 states represented
      • Bullied children, children who bully, and bystanders
      • Racially and socio-economically diverse
    • Steering Committee of Campaign Partners
    • 5 Implementation Working Groups (IWG)
    • Education, health & safety, mental health, law enforcement & justice, youth-serving
  • 16. Campaign Supporters
    • A World Of Difference Institute/Anti-Defamation League
    • American Academy of Pediatrics
    • American Association of School Administrators
    • American Counseling Association
    • American Federation of Teachers
    • American Medical Association
    • American Medical Association Alliance
    • American Occupational Therapy Association
    • American Public Health Association
    • American School Counselors Association
    • American School Health Association
    • Anti-Defamation League
    • Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs
    • Big Brothers Big Sisters of America
    • Boys and Girls Clubs of America
    • Center on Children and the Law, American Bar Association
    • Child Welfare League of America
    • Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder
    • Children’s Safety Network
    • Colorado Attorney General’s Office
    • Council of Chief State School Officers
    • Emergency Nurses Association
    • Family, Career & Community Leaders of America
    • Fight Crime: Invest in Kids
    • Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network
    • Girls Scouts of USA
    • Leawood Police Department
    • National 4-H Council
    • National Alliance for Hispanic Health
    • National Assembly on School-Based Health Care
    • National Association of for Sport and Physical Education
    • National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners
    • National Association of police Athletic Leagues
    • National Association of School Nurses
    • National Association of School Psychologists
    • National Association of School Resource Officers
    • National Association of Secondary School Principals
    • National Association of Social Workers
    • National Center for Victims of Crime
    • National Crime Prevention Council
    • National Education Association
    • National Federation For Catholic Youth Ministry
    • National Mental health Association
    • National Middle School Association
    • National Organizations for Youth Safety
    • National Parent Teachers Association
    • National Peer Helpers Association
    • National School Boards Association
    • New Jersey State Bar Foundation
    • Prevent Childe Abuse America
    • Safe USA
    • School Social Work Association of America
    • Society of Adolescent Medicine
    • Society of Pediatric Nurses
    • State & Territorial Injury Prevention Directors’ Association
    • State Adolescent Health Coordinators Network
    • Students Against Destructive Decisions
    • The ASPIRA Association, Inc
    • U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    • U.S. Dept of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention
    • United National Indian Tribal Youth
    • Young Life, Wyldlife Ministries
    • YMCA of Mohawk Valley
  • 17. Campaign Components
  • 18. Animated Serial Comic
    • Twelve two-minute “webisodes”
      • New episode posted every 2 weeks
    • Entertaining to tweens
    • Modeling positive behaviors
    • Interactive
  • 19. Public Service Announcements
    • For television, radio, and print
    • Different spots target:
      • Youth bystanders
      • Children who are bullied
      • Adults
    • National Association of Broadcasters will distribute PSAs
    • NBC “The More You Know” 2 nd season
  • 20. Campaign Resource Kit
    • Two components:
      • Clearinghouse of existing bullying prevention programs & resources
      • New bullying prevention resources
        • Created to address needs expressed by campaign partners
        • Developed by bullying prevention experts
    • Web: www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov
    • or hard-copy via HRSA Helpline
    • 888-ASK-HRSA
  • 21. Campaign Communications Kit
    • For use by partner organizations, schools, businesses, communities
    • News media materials
    • Resources tailored to local news media efforts (templates, PSAs)
    • Web-based and also available in hard-copy
  • 22. Campaign Launch Event
    • March 1, 2004, 11:00 AM
    • KIPP Key Academy, Washington, DC
    • Involvement by:
      • Surgeon General and HRSA Administrator
      • US Departments of Education and Justice
      • Youth Expert Panel
      • Partners
    • Premiere PSAs, Webisodes/Web site, other key components of campaign
  • 23. National Teleconference
    • April 19, 2004 7:30-9 pm EDT
    • www.mchcom.com
    • Live, working teleconference to help key audiences adopt campaign components
    • Platform for showcasing “What Works” in bullying prevention
    • Participation by representatives of DHHS, DEd, DOJ, and others
    • Participation by Campaign partners and Youth Expert Panel
  • 24. Contact:
    • Stephanie Bryn, MPH
    • Director, Injury and Violence Prevention
    • HRSA/MCHB
    • [email_address]