Social Media Roundup: Case study - Driving the news with social media
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Social Media Roundup: Case study - Driving the news with social media

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As Hurricane Irene made its way up the east coast, news stations provided coverage from beaches in South Carolina to Times Square in New York. During the events of the hurricane, a good amount of Army ...

As Hurricane Irene made its way up the east coast, news stations provided coverage from beaches in South Carolina to Times Square in New York. During the events of the hurricane, a good amount of Army news also surfaced, much of it covering the National Guard's preparation and response to the weather. During the chaotic events of the weekend, The Old Guard posted a particularly compelling photo to its Facebook Page. The powerful nature of the image led the Army to Tweet the photo using the official U.S. Army Twitter account. The Tweet and photo quickly went viral. Today's Social Media Roundup takes a closer look at the Tweet and shows how quickly the featured photo traveled.

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Social Media Roundup: Case study - Driving the news with social media Social Media Roundup: Case study - Driving the news with social media Presentation Transcript

  • Case Study:
    Driving the news with social media
  • Social Media Roundup
    Introduction
    • During the events of Hurricane Irene, the Army found a particularly compelling photo on The Old Guard’s Facebook Page. The Army Tweeted the image using the official U.S. Army Twitter account.
    • The Tweet quickly went viral, with over 450 people retweetingit within 24 hours, including retweets from verified accounts of congress representatives and news organizations.
    • Content goes viral much faster on Twitter than on Facebook because users don't actually have to follow someone to get their content. On Twitter, users can follow a hashtag (#Irene) or a topic to receive all of the Tweets mentioning certain keywords. On Facebook, users have to “like” the page or have friends that “like” the page and comment on it in order for users to see it.
    The Tweet above includes a hashtag (#Irene) tags (@The_Old_Guard) and a link. All of these elements help make it much more likely for a Tweet to go viral.
  • Social Media Roundup
    Twitter reach
    • Of the 450 retweets listed on IceRocket.com within the first 24 hours, many of the followers had over 500 followers. One user in particular had over 15,000 followers.
    • The total reach of the 450 retweets (not including the initial 90,000 reached by the Army’s Twitter account) was over 168,000, and the ripple effect continued from there.
    IceRocket.com is typically used for blog searches but users can also search social networking websites like Twitter and Facebook as well.
    @TrendsDC is a Twitter account that provides Tweets showing which hashtags are trending in the Washington, D.C. area. It also provides a link to a map showing where the Tweets are coming from.
  • Social Media Roundup
    Facebook impact
    • The original post on the Old Guard’s Facebook Page (http://goo.gl/u9Zmp) received 365 “likes” and 63 comments within 24 hours.
    • In addition to Tweeting the image, the Army followed the Old Guard’s lead and posted the photo to its Facebook wall where it collected 1,438 “likes” and 273 comments within 24 hours.
    • By tagging the Old Guard in its Facebook post, combined with the viral nature of the original Tweet, the Old Guard Facebook Page went from 5,800 followers to over 12,000 by the end of the weekend. By the following Thursday, the “likes” had swelled to over 28,000.
    Link to an article in the Daily Beast covering the Old Guard and the hurricane.
    Tags linking to the Old Guard and Arlington Cemetery Facebook Pages.
  • Social Media Roundup
    National coverage
    • Several national news services ran the image as part of their Hurricane Irene coverage. Pieces on the image ran on several national networks extending the reach of the coverage into the tens of millions.
    • This image, originally posted to a Facebook Page with just over 5,800 “likes” grew into a national news story reaching millions of people in the space of 24 hours. This demonstrates that even the simplest of posts can turn viral in a matter of moments.
  • Social Media Roundup
    Contact information
    Have questions? Please feel free to reach out to us at the Online and Social Media Division
    Email:
    Ocpa.osmd@us.army.mil
    To review and download past editions of the Social Media Roundup, visit our Slideshare site at: http://www.slideshare.net/usarmysocialmedia. If you do not have access to Slideshare, they can also be found on AKO at: https://www.us.army.mil/suite/page/505262.All Social Media Roundups are authorized to be distributed to a broader audience.
    9/7/201
    OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
    PENTAGON
    6