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Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
Getting Published: Tips & Resources
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Getting Published: Tips & Resources

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UQ Library, Scholarly Publishing and Digitisation Service (SPaDS) presentation for higher degree students on tips and resources available from the UQ Library and based on academic interviews, to help …

UQ Library, Scholarly Publishing and Digitisation Service (SPaDS) presentation for higher degree students on tips and resources available from the UQ Library and based on academic interviews, to help with getting published in journals.

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  • If 50,000,000 articles since 1665 – and half have never been cited we need to focus getting in right early on
  • Introductions
    Background – resources & web site
    We will be sharing the tips from UQ’s best authors throughout the session – we will continue to add to these resources
  • Image: Author died more than 70 years ago - public domain
  • Definition of thesis by types graduate school page
    Example of a PhD partly comprised of publications
    Link to find UQ, Australian & international theses
  • This diagram illustrates the publishing process from the perspective of a large international publishing company - Elsevier. From the 500,000+ article submissions they receive each year, the percentage of articles rejected (40%-90%) -- other major titles: NEJM 5% acceptance rates per year; and Nature receives 10,000 submissions a year, sending 4,000 out for peer review (rejecting the other 6,000 before review) they accept 7% of the 4,000. As an author, you are concerned with the submission and management, peer review and editing/preparation parts of this process.
  • The processes of research and writing rarely occur independently of each other. Frequently the writing becomes intertwined with the research and the two build upon each other. Targeting a specific journal for submission of your article can have implications for content and format as well as the writing and referencing conventions that you use.
  • If you are redeveloping a piece from an existing work, refining your ideas may be as simple as creating a draft outline for the article.
    If you are working on something new, these tips may help you refine your ideas enough to define the pool of potential journals:
    Talk it over. Share your ideas with colleagues (your supervisor, lecturers or other students). Working on your ideas with others can often help you to achieve clarity and may present new opportunities.
    Mind Map. Brainstorming your ideas visually can often present new opportunities and demonstrate how ideas are interconnected. Mind maps help you to associate ideas, think creatively, and make connections that you might not otherwise make.
    Identify the gap, anomaly or other reason for embarking on your research; construct a hypothesis and define the aim of the study.
     
    Write it. Force yourself to begin writing, for often the most difficult part of writing is actually commencing the process. Create a plan and place time slots in your diary for writing. Dedicate at least 15 minutes a day to writing your paper.
     
  • Embed YouTube video Tamara Davis – Good Research
    3 minutes
    <object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/UB0ebIM7WoA?version=3&hl=en_GB"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/UB0ebIM7WoA?version=3&hl=en_GB" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education published an article March 4, 2012 titled “‘Predatory’ Online Journals Lure Scholars Who Are Eager to Publish.” It describes the hidden danger of open access publications. Many new publishers and journals have been developed during the past 5-10 years to take advantage of scholars who want to publish their work in open access journals. Some of these “predatory” publishers have set up journals to earn money rather than advance scholarship.
    Is the publisher on the list of Predatory Publishers? Jeffrey Beall, Metadata Librarian at the University of Colorado at Denver,
  • Prof Lu using “Max Lu” rather than “Gaoqing Lu”, (though he sometimes uses “Gaoging Max Lu” and a number of other variants.) The key is to use the same name consistently, and/or sign up for a ResearcherID (OR ORCID when available).
  • There are resources available that will provide you with valuable information about journal titles so that you can make an informed decision about where you will submit your manuscript.
  • Professor Tom O'Regan, The University of Queensland School of English, Media Studies and Art History discusses his experiences of publishing in The Arts. Professor O'Regan highlights the importance of selecting the most suitable journal for submission of an article based on a journal's style, type of debate and method – rather than content.
  • Taken from Dr Alma Swan’s presentation available from Slide Share: http://www.slideshare.net/UQSPADS/dr-28028199
  • Ask what students are using
    http://chronicle.com/article/Hot-Type-Despite-Warnings/127050/ --
    Despite Warnings, Biomedical Scholars Cite Hundreds of Retracted Papers
    By Jennifer Howard
    Authors, you really ought to take a look at the journal articles you cite. Not only is it the responsible thing to do, it will save you the embarrassment of discovering after the fact that you have given a nod to a retracted or discredited paper.
  • Your manuscript may be returned to you multiple times for revisions.
  • Embed YouTube video Tamara Davis – Peer Review
    3 minutes
  • CensorshipRead the Nature1 editorial about the mammalian transmissibility of avian flu research that Editors at Nature and Science were told not to publish by the US National Science Advisory Board in 2011.
    “A paper that omits key results or methods disables subsequent research and peer review……Where there is a benefit to public health or science, publish! It has been enlightening to see how scientists in this secretive arena see the open scientific enterprise as their best recourse in times of potential trouble.” 1. Publishing risky research. (2012). Nature, 485(7396), 5-5.DOI:10.1038/485005a
  • Rejection. There may be any number of reasons why your article was rejected for publication. The piece may not fall within the journal’s guidelines or scope of interest and is considered unsuitable. For this reason it is crucial that you devote considerable time to choosing the journal initially.
    Rejection can be a very useful learning process, helping you to improve your work. For more on this, see: The A-Z of the Review and Editorial Process, Publish, Not Perish Module 4, page 20.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Getting published in journals: tips & resources Lisa Kruesi & Sharon Bunce, January 2014 Scholarly Publishing and Digitisation Service
    • 2. Learning Objectives 1. Process of scholarly publishing 2. Where to publish 3. Author responsibilities 4. Writing resources 5. Managing references 6. Peer Review 7. Promoting your paper 8. Journal of the future 9. Top tips summary
    • 3. http://www.library.uq.edu.au/research-support 3
    • 4. Core Functions •Register research findings, their timing & the person(s) responsible •Review and certify findings before they are published •Disseminate new knowledge World’s first scientific journal •Preserve a record of the findings for the long term
    • 5. Thesis by publication UQ Library eScholarship: research data http://www.library.uq.edu.au/blogs/sp/20 Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 6. The publishing process: a publisher’s perspective Image courtesy http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/intro.cws_home/glance_1 Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 7. Research or Writing what comes first? More details: Where to start Image courtesy of http://blogs.abc.net.au/allinthemind/2008/04
    • 8. Refining your ideas • Talk it over with colleagues • Mind mapping your ideas for an article can reveal new relationships • Identify the gap in the research and define your aims • Plan, make time, and WRITE! More details Where to Start Image courtesy of http://smartstorming-blog.com/tag/mind-mapping/ Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 9. UQ School of Mathematics & Physics Go Live To Dr Tamara Davis' - You Good Research http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UB0ebIM7WoA&list=PL00C07719206487B3&feature=mh_lolz Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 10. Where to publish? • Decide early (before drafting the paper). Look for a journal and then write the paper. Read the publishing guidelines on the journal’s website. Check publishing options. • Look for journals that have published in your discipline area • Consider journals that have published work you cite • Audience – who will read your article? • Prestige – does the journal appear on the ERA journal listings? • Predatory Publishers List • UQ list of journals (in process) • Access – will you publish in an open access journal? • Journal Impact Factors – refers to how often a journal’s content is cited by other authors, thereby giving an indication of the influence of a publication. Available from Journal Citation Reports. Other journal quality measures. • Likelihood of acceptance – top tier v’s less prestigious journals More details: Where to Publish Your Journal Article of presentation Month 2008 Name
    • 11. Find out about author responsibilities The Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research available at the Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council Website UQ Authorship policies 4.20.04 Explains the requirements for determining authorship on publications 4.20.06 Research Data Management 4.20.08 Open Access for UQ Research Outputs It is vitally important to record your name, your institution’s name and your funding authority’s name consistently in your publications Register: http://orcid.org/ Don’t end up on retraction watch More details Fact Author Responsibilities Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 12. Generally, the rule is to submit only to one journal at a time. More on this is available from: Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research, Section 4.7 Multiple submissions of research findings Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 13. Where to publish - resources • The 2012 ERA Journal Listings contains journals that are eligible for a university’s ERA 2012 submissions. To be updated 2014. Titles on this list are scholarly, peer reviewed journals that publish original research. Definition: ERA (Excellence in Research for Australia) is a Federal Government initiative that assesses the research quality within Australia's higher education institutions. ERA uses a combination of peer review and metrics indicators to evaluate research across eight discipline clusters.
    • 14. Where to publish – resources UQ Library Subject Guides provide links to relevant databases in specific subject areas.
    • 15. Where to publish - resources • UlrichsWeb provides detailed bibliographic information about over 300 000 journal titles.
    • 16. Where to publish - resources Journal Citation Reports can help you to identify high-impact journals Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 17. Where to publish – resources Journal Citation Reports
    • 18. Where to publish? • Scopus – Elsevier OR Open Sources • Google Scholar • SCImago Further information about these resources: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:309667
    • 19. Where to publish? Professor Tom O’Regan UQ School of Media English Studies and Art History http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PctsFyy0sbY&feature=relmfu Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 20. Open Access for more: www.library.uq.edu.au/open-access Immediate Free (to use) Free (of restrictions) Access to the peer-reviewed literature (and data) Not vanity publishing Not a ‘stick anything up on the Web’ approach Moving scholarly communication into the Web Age
    • 21. SEE: Open Access Presentations available: https://www.library.uq.edu.au/open-access Alma Swan http://www.slideshare.net/UQSPADS/dr-28028199
    • 22. Writing resources at UQ • Supervisors • Student Services • Writing Workshops • Writing Modules • Resources held in the Library More details: Writing resources & online modules Help with publishing if English is not your first language Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 23. Managing your references - HELP • Reference packages via UQ Library • Free reference managers available online include More details : How to Manage References
    • 24. Managing your references - HELP •UQ Library Research Support reference management webpage •UQ Library referencing styles guide •UQ Library phone service (07) 33656063 (Mon-Fri) and email
    • 25. From submission to publication Peer Review Process… The peer review process is a form of quality assurance…..during this process, experts in your field consider the merits of your work. They provide journal editors with an impartial decision about whether or not to publish, as well as how to improve an article already accepted for publication (Boden). Purpose • To help the editor decide whether to publish the paper. • To help the authors improve the paper, whether or not the journal accepts it. More details Peer review
    • 26. Peer Review
    • 27. Go Live To Dr Tamara Davis http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5g1H3-8R4Q Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 28. Editorial Process for Journals More details: Editorial Process Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 29. The final decision. Acceptance • Further revisions • Editor • Copy editor • Final proofreading Rejection Understand the reasons: • Content • Format • Author guidelines • Writing structure Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 30. Celebrate the publication of your paper! Image courtesy of www.wordle.com
    • 31. Promote Your Paper More details: Promoting your paper Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 32. Top Tips for Publishing • Explaining the motivation for why you’ve undertaken the research is just as important as explaining the results. • If you write a paper that is simple where concepts are explained and the motivation for your research is clear, people will understand your paper, use your results and you will get cited. • Don’t be discouraged by a referee’s reports • Write often, every day if possible, at least 15 mins
    • 33. Top Tips continued… • If you have good research and results, writing the papers will naturally follow on from that. • When deciding where to publish, consider the journal’s approach to the subject matter (of your research) and to the style of debate within the journal itself. • Journals can have up to a two year lead time. Consider publishing in a mix of venues so that you can ensure that your work is out in the public domain (rather than waiting to be published).
    • 34. References mentioned during the presentation: Laurance, WF, Useche, DC, Laurance, SG & Bradshaw, CJA 2013, 'Predicting publication success for biologists', BioScience, vol. 63, no. 10, pp. 817-823. doi:10.1525/bio.2013.63.10.9 Priem, J 2013, 'Scholarship: Beyond the paper', Nature, vol. 495, no. 7442, pp. 437440. doi:10.1038/495437a The article of the future is now live – seven scientific areas http://www.articleofthefuture.com/history
    • 35. More references… Belcher, W. (2009). Writing your Journal Article in 12 Weeks. Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA. Boden, S. “The Role and Nature of Peer Review.” The Library Research Exchange, University of Warwick, n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2012. Booth, W., Colomb, G., & Williams, J. (1995). The Craft of Research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Osman-Gani, A.M., Poell, R.F. (2011). International and Cross-Cultural Issues in Scholarly Publishing in The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing, Jossey-Bass, Hoboken. University of Colorado Libraries. (2006). Publish, not perish: The Art and Craft of Publishing in Scholarly Journals. Retrieved from http://www.publishnotperish.org/ Scholarly Publishing UQ Library Series (2012): YouTube videos http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL00C07719206487B3&feature=plcp With thanks and acknowledgement - Assoc Prof Tamara Davis and Prof Tom O’Regan, The University of Queensland Name of presentation Month 2008
    • 36. Thank you for attending l.kruesi@library.uq.edu.au

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