Paul hockenos energiewende keynote zagreb

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Paul hockenos energiewende keynote zagreb

  1. 1. Germany‘s Renewable Energy Revolution Paul Hockenos www.phockenos.com BLOG: Going Renewable
  2. 2. The Energiewende
  3. 3. Rationale for the Energiewende • Climate protection • Nuclear power is unsafe • Cut expensive imports, boost domestic revenue (value added) • Increase energy security
  4. 4. Goals of the Energiewende • Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2020, 55% by 2030, and 80-95% by 2050 (compared with 1990). • By 2020, the share of renewables in final energy consumption is to reach 18%, and then gradually increase further to 30% by 2030 and 60% by 2050. Germany wants an 45% share in electricity production by 2025 and 80% by 2050. • Energy efficiency: Reduction of primary energy consumption by 20% by 2020 and 50% by 2050 compared with 2008. • Double the building renovation rate from 1% to 2%. • Cut energy consumption in the transport sector by around 10% by 2020 and around 40% by 2050. Germany wants to have six million electric vehicles on the roads by 2030.
  5. 5. The Anti-Nuclear Power Movement
  6. 6. Chernobyl disaster spring 1986
  7. 7. The Red-Green Coalition
  8. 8. Germany’s Electricity Mix
  9. 9. Development of RE in Germany‘s Energy Supply 1998-2012 Source: BMU; latest update: 3/13
  10. 10. Electricity Production from Renewable Energies
  11. 11. Decentralized Energy Supply
  12. 12. Renewable Energy Ownership
  13. 13. Germany’s Energy Co-ops
  14. 14. Jobs in Renewable Energy
  15. 15. Renewables and the German Economy
  16. 16. Growing Economy, Declining Emissions
  17. 17. Renewables and the German Economy
  18. 18. Issues and Shortcomings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Reserve capacity and the missing money Much slower progress in heat, fuel, transportation, efficiency Grid expansion slow Coal too prominent, EU ETS broken Merkel herself very indecisive Winners and losers Fossil fuels lobby fighting back Costs to consumers have risen Destabilzing Polish and Czech power grids EU-level contradictions
  19. 19. German citizens want the Energiewende

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