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SOCW336 Lecture 1
 

SOCW336 Lecture 1

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    SOCW336 Lecture 1 SOCW336 Lecture 1 Presentation Transcript

    • Week One
      • Lecture
      • Introductions
      • Theory & Ethics
      • Foundations
      • Philosophy
      • Assignments
      • Self Assessment
      • Address questions
      • Case Study
      • Readings
      • Banks – chapter 1,2,3
      • Miller – chapter 1, 2
      • Additional/Grads
      • Nietzche
      • Mills
      • Kant
      • To each other
      • To your group
      • Monitors – Graduate Students
      • To the course
      • Action items:
      • Discussion in your group
      • What constitutes an “Ethical” problem or question?
      • What “is” vs What “ought”
      • Can we define “good” or “right” as an ethical definition?
      • Defining: Ethics – Values – Morals - Virtues
      • Write out what you believe ethics are .....
      • Where do they come from ....
      • What is the difference between ethical dilemma and a ethical problem?
      • Ethics in treatment : 5 th Century BC – Hippocrates
      • Medical Ethics termed: 1803 by Thomas Percival
      • 1849 First Code of Medical Ethics – 1903/1946 revised and updated .
      • Disturbing studies and unethical behaviour by Nazi & US “experiments”
      • Formalized rules of conduct growth bio –ethics
      • Rights to Autonomy = Right of self determination
      • 1950-70 leaps of scientific growth -
      • 1971: Bio- ethics discipline
      • Individual rights
      • Informed consent
      • New technology
      • Question of life and death
      • Genetic movements
      • Legal challenges
      • War/Conflict: Vietnam
      • Global community
      • Justify
      • OUTCOME /Action
      • Decision Framework
      • Logic
      • Argument
      • To explain & justify
      • Act of analysis
      • Critical reflection
      • Process of
      • Rational discussion of Process
      • Obligated
      • Ethical reason supports
      • Prohibited
      • Ethical reason against
      • Permitted
      • No ethical reason against it
      • It is the explanation and justification of how/what they are....
      • Study of moral behaviours
      • What is deemed acceptable / not ?
      • Changing / in flux
      • Living discipline
      • Autonomy – Make decisions for self “self-rule ”
      • Beneficence – To actively do good / beneficial
      • Non-maleficence – do no harm
      • Veracity – Always truthful, Honest, Straight-Forward
      • Confidentiality – to maintain even after death unless related to harm to self or others.
      • Justice – equal and equitable to all
      • Fidelity – Loyalty and commitment
      • Descriptive:
      • How people actually behave
      • Describes the facts
      • No judgement
      • Normative:
      • How people ought to act
      • Evaluative to the normal expectations
      • Value based
      • Meta-Ethics
      • Considers what extenuating circumstances are there to influence our ethics.
      • Morals
      • Virtues
      • Responsibilities
      • Rights
      • Choice
      • Interpretation
      • Natural Law (Nature, Religion)
      • Utilitarianism – Consequences (Act, Rule & Preference)
      • Categorical Imperative – Intention (logical rule & personal obligation)
      • Virtue Ethics
      • Situation Ethics
      • Principalism Ethics
      • Intuitionalism Ethics
      • Emotive Ethics
      • Naturalism and Metaphysical Ethics
      • Prescriptivism
      • Care Ethics
      • Ethics of Suffering
      • Personhood & Moral Worth
      • Feminist Ethics
      • Cultural Ethics
      • Associated with the work of John Stuart Mills (1806-1873) formation of: Consequentialism = Utilitarianism
      • Principle foundations:
      • Greatest amount of good
      • The good of the group vs the good of the single
      • Based on the analysis of the consequences of action and the level of pleasure it brings vs level of discomfort
      • Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804) question of intention focus.
      • Principles :
      • Concepts of humans have free will to act
      • Choice of actions based on agreed upon rules (Maxiums) developed by society as “right or wrong” “bad or good”
      • Elements of “duty” to act in a certain way
      • Logics & reason of moral and virtue
      • Moral law
      • Can not derive a “ought from an is”
      • Absolutism
      • Postmodern thought - John Dewey,
      • (Virtue, Caring, Feminist, Cultural)
      • Principles :
      • Equality & Justice & Power
      • Self esteem
      • Roles (ascribed and other)
      • Character based “virtuous behaviours” (honesty)
      • Individual traits
      • Care and attendance as a duty? Responsible person
      • Two way relationship
      • Collaboration
      • Holistic relationships
      • Absolute
      • Abortion is wrong under any circumstances
      • Abortion is always a woman’s choice
      • Death penalty is right and those that kill should be killed.
      • Relative
      • The age, ability, situation etc... Impacts the decision of Abortion
      • Perspectives of others should be considered...
      • Your / social worlds concept of “natural or normal”
      • I “value” life
      • Those you choose (Nietzsche)
      • Existentialism
      • Social Contract
      • Those taught to you via socialization
      • What aspire to be “ought's”
      • Individual characteristics that we deem “good”
      • Describe a virtuous person ...
      • Some Examples....
      • Honesty, Charitable, Unselfish, “play it forward concepts”, Sharing, Kind, Giving, Loving etc....
      • People we may identify as virtuous: Mother Theresa, Pope, John Kennedy, Ghandi,
      • Professional Codes of Conduct
      • Membership Association
      • Determined by court process
      • Society to which one is a member
      • Religion influences
      • Cultural influences
      • Theory & Ethics
      • Foundations
      • Philosophy
      • Differences between ethics, morality, values, virtues ...
      • The legal aspects of Ethics.