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Teaching that sticks! Christina slides
 

Teaching that sticks! Christina slides

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  • In Teaching that Sticks, the Heath Brothers describe how they reverse engineered sticky ideas to identify the features they have in commonThese elements form an acronym, SuccesThe Heath brothers believe (and so do we!) that if you follow this acronym, you will be able to make your presentations more sticky.We’ll go through this acronym in the next part of this workshop
  • Integration – Relate to the viewpoints of different stakeholders - cross-disciplinary teams
  • Dee Fink divides learning into these six components and posits that they are interrelated rather than sequential. The three on the right are similar to Bloom’s taxonomy. By human dimension Fink means skills like teamwork and communication. Caring has to do with motivation and valuing the subject matter. Learning to learn includes reflecting on learning and how to improve.
  • Human dimension – self-authorship – see yourself as a scientist – show human angle of science
  • Caring– Value– reflective writing – what was difficult about reading this? What “facts” were called into question?
  • In Teaching that Sticks, the Heath Brothers describe how they reverse engineered sticky ideas to identify the features they have in commonThese elements form an acronym, SuccesThe Heath brothers believe (and so do we!) that if you follow this acronym, you will be able to make your presentations more sticky.We’ll go through this acronym in the next part of this workshop
  • CC

Teaching that sticks! Christina slides Teaching that sticks! Christina slides Presentation Transcript

  • Teaching that Sticks! Six CorePrinciples for Creating memorable Presentations
  • CJ
  • aaabv Have them dig deep
  • Environment Situational Context Environmental Factors: Institutions, Disciplines, Cultures, Communities, Classrooms Outcomes Intended Learning Outcomes Instruction AssessmentLearning & Teaching Activities Feedback & Assessment Components/Tasks
  • “A credible idea makes people Emotional picturebelieve. An emotional idea makespeople care.” - Made to Stick
  • Most motivation theories describe twocomponents to student motivationActivities Some Studentthat are expectancy valued of success Motivation
  • Lab Safety Demonstration Have them dig deep
  • “The most basic way to make people care is toform an association between something theydon’t yet care about and something they docare about.” - Made to Stick
  • Model 1 – Emotion drives value EMOTION VALUE OUTCOME
  • Case studies allow students toexperience real world ambiguity From Mark Faviell Photos/flickr
  • Have them dig deep
  • But, how do I know what mystudents value? Ask them! UofM Image library
  • Questions that may help youreveal your students values• This course will be a success for me if…• The biggest challenge I see in this course is…
  • Show your emotion:why you love your topic UofM Image library
  • Model 2 – Emotion IS the outcome X Y EMOTION
  • V L.Dee Fink (2003)
  • Environment Situational Context Environmental Factors: Institutions, Disciplines, Cultures, Communities, Classrooms Outcomes Intended Learning Outcomes Instruction AssessmentLearning & Teaching Activities Feedback & Assessment Components/Tasks
  • See yourself as a scientist (self-authorship) National Library of Medicine
  • Reflective writing allows students tosee their own subjective reactions “How was this reading difficult for you?” Have them dig deep
  • “ …the really difficult part of teachingis not organizing and presenting thecontent…but rather in doingsomething that inspires students ...tohave some level of emotionalinvolvement with it.” - Robert Leamnson Learning as Biological Brain Change
  • In summary• Have them dig deep• Introducing emotion makes people care• Show your enthusiasm for your subject• Link to things students care about• Ask students what they care about• Make emotion your outcome
  • CJ
  • Review of our stories
  • Our brains are “wired” for storyJeromeBruner: JonathanNarrative Gottschall:Ways of LiteraryKnowing Darwinist rorotoko.com
  • Tell your story From latimesblogs.latimes.com
  • “…a lot of good might comefrom letting our ownenthusiasm show while weare teaching.”- Robert Leamnson From latimesblogs.latimes.com
  • “A story is powerful,because it provides the ‘“A story is powerful, because itcontext missing from provides the context missing fromabstract prose” - Made to Stick abstract prose” - Made to Stick tobybarnes on flickr
  • Use storytelling effectively in your teaching
  • Connect your story to yourge library learning outcome
  • Don’t memorize your story Newhavenindependent.org
  • Use in moderation
  • Refer back to yourstory kellybader.com
  • In summary• Our brains are wired for story• Tell your story• Connect story to outcomes• Don’t memorize• Use in moderation• Refer back to your story
  • Activity1. Remember your learning outcome that you wrote during Jane’s section?2. Choose a story (preferably one that evokes emotions) to help your students achieve that outcome.3. Jot down your story.4. During lunch tell share your story with the people sitting near you at your table.5. Reveal your learning outcome to your listeners. Ask them for feedback.
  • National Library of Medicine
  • Story Feedback1. Now that you’ve had a chance to listen to each others stories…2. How do you pull them all together?3. Synthesize an understanding you have about stories and teaching based on the stories you heard at your table
  • ReferencesAmbrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). What factors motivate students to learn? How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching (pp. 67 - 91). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons.Eshel, N. (2007). The science inside learning. Washington, D.C.: The American Association for the Advancement of Science.Fink, L. D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses (First ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Heath, C., & Heath, D. (2008). Made to stick: Why some ideas survive and others die. New York: Random House.Heath, C., & Heath, D. (2010). Teaching that sticks www.heathbrothers.comHofer, B. (2011). Motivation in the college classroom. In M. Svinicki, & W. J. McKeachie (Eds.), McKeachies teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (13th ed., pp. 140 - 150). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Leamnson, R. (2000). Learning as biological brain change. Change, 32(6), 34 - 40.Reynolds, G. (2012). Presentation Zen: Simple ideas on presentation design and delivery (2nd ed.). Berkeley, CA: New Riders Press.Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J. S. (2000). Expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 68-81.