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Active Learning: Matching Activities to Outcomes

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Slides supporting workshop presented at the Institute on the Environment's 2012 Sustainability Across the Curriculum Workshop on 8 June 2012.

Slides supporting workshop presented at the Institute on the Environment's 2012 Sustainability Across the Curriculum Workshop on 8 June 2012.

Published in Education
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  • Plus – more engaging, deeper learning, fits with different learning styles, fosters students getting to know each otherMinus – doesn’t fit with all learning styles, not everyone does the same amount of work, some students dominate, it’s hard to cover all the material
  • Learning occurs best when courses are designed to keep these components in alignment. For example if an outcome is for students to be critical thinkers, you don’t want activities to be primarily listening to lectures. Similarly for assessment, multiple choice questions of recall would not fit with this goal. Situational context also influences your teaching activities. A three hour class requires a different approach than a fifty minute one.
  • Learning occurs best when courses are designed to keep these components in alignment. For example if an outcome is for students to be critical thinkers, you don’t want activities to be primarily listening to lectures. Similarly for assessment, multiple choice questions of recall would not fit with this goal. Situational context also influences your teaching activities. A three hour class requires a different approach than a fifty minute one.
  • Dee Fink divides learning into these six components and posits that they are interrelated rather than sequential. The three on the right are similar to Bloom’s taxonomy. By human dimension Fink means skills like teamwork and communication. Caring has to do with motivation and valuing the subject matter. Learning to learn includes reflecting on learning and how to improve.
  • Comments are new to students but are representative of the theories or writers being studied. Can be a catalyst for a small group discussion or done individually
  • Groups larger than four can make it difficult for each member to have a unique function and therefore a need to contribute. Assigning roles helps.
  • From FInk
  • Instructors set the norms for active participation on Day 1. If students are going to talk in class, they need to do so the first day! An icebreaker that begins with 1:1 conversations is a good way to start. Your own personal style can determine whether to use one that’s related to the course content or just a get-to-know you question. A concrete task (line up in order of…….) insures all participate.Line up: in order of years of experience in alphabetically by Walking votes: true or false related to fieldTwo minute mixers:n
  • Groups larger than four can make it difficult for each member to have a unique function and therefore a need to contribute. Assigning roles helps. Another option is to assign the roles based on different perspectives – for example in an ethics class, one person represents the doctor’s point of view, another the patient, another the spouse etc.
  • Punctuate a PowerPoint lecture with a blank slide to get students attention and provide a quiet moment to reflect on learning. It’s also a good reminder to the instructor to stop for questions.
  • Those in goal are the U of MN’s student learning outcomes. White font indicates Fink’s definitions.
  • Use tests to increase learning as well as measure it. Ask students what they think they have learned from the exam, how well they studied and what changes they might make. Another question is for them to reflect on the future usefulness of the exam.

Transcript

  • 1. Christina Petersen Jane O’Brien Center for Teaching and Learning pete6647@umn.eduBC obrie093@umn.edu
  • 2.  Introduce integrated aligned course design approach  Add to your repertoire of teaching techniques  Identify implementation guidelinesCJ
  • 3. Benefits ChallengesJJ
  • 4.  Skip missing/matching; focus on mattersJC
  • 5. S i t u a t i o n a l C o n t e x t Learning Outcomes Teaching & Learning Activities AssessmentCC L.Dee Fink (2003)
  • 6. S i t u a t i o n a l C o n t e x t Learning Outcomes Teaching & Learning Activities AssessmentCC L.Dee Fink (2003)
  • 7. V L.Dee Fink (2003)CC
  • 8. CJ
  • 9. What’s matching? missing? What does it mean? Why does it matter?JJ
  • 10. A B It doesn’t Matter C DJC (Mazur, 2002)
  • 11. CJ
  • 12.   Nothing is divine but what is Aristotle agreeable to reason Immanuel Kant  We are what we repeatedly do  The liberty of the individual John Stuart Mill must be limited; he must not make himself a nuisance to other people JC
  • 13. Facilitator Divergent Thinker Note taker SummarizerCJ
  • 14. JJ
  • 15. Which statement is correct about students in Spring 2011? a. 73% Often or very often had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own b. 57% Participated in community service as part of a regular course c. 66% Often or very often put together ideas or concepts from different courses when completing assignments or during class discussions Sourcehttps://www.oir.umn.edu/surveys/nsse/public/nsse_engagementJC
  • 16. CC
  • 17. Monitor & reconsider Identify own biasRealize there’s nosingle correct answer Susan Wolcott: http://www.units.muohio.edu/led/Workshops/CC Wolcott%20Wksp%20handouts.pdf
  • 18.  Learns about oneself and othersCJ
  • 19.  Connect icebreaker to course content Give students a task to accomplishJC
  • 20. CC
  • 21. CJ
  • 22. Below level of awarenessJC
  • 23. CJ
  • 24. JC
  • 25. •How was this exam like I expected? How was this exam different?•What parts did I feel well prepared for?•What parts did I not feel well prepared for?•Was there a pattern to any mistakes I made?•What should I do differently next time?CC
  • 26. 1. Connect the activity to your learning outcomes2. Tell students why you are doing this3. Give clear and succinct directions4. Give students a chance to prepare5. Insure individual as well as group accountability CC
  • 27.  Tips on grading group work http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/teams Grading Rubrics (Park University) http://www.park.edu/cetl/quicktips/rubrics.html Active Learning Techniques (Indiana State University www.indiana.edu/~icy/document/active_learnin g_techniques.pdf Immediate Feedback Forms http://www.epsteineducation.com/home/ CC
  • 28.  Fink, L. Dee. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Mazur, Eric. (1997). Peer instruction a user’s manual. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Michaelsen, L., et al. (Eds.)(2004). Team-based learning: A transformative use of small groups in college teaching. CJ
  • 29. 3 2 1 new ways question things you you you can have Learned apply thisMJ
  • 30. Sample Rubrics (Winona State University):http://course1.winona.edu/shatfield/air/rubrics.htmActive Learning in Large Classes:http://www.uoguelph.ca/cera/Curriculum/White%20Paper/large%20classes.html