Being student medical educators (oslo 2013)
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Being student medical educators (oslo 2013)

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We were invited to the University of Oslo to present our experiences and help them to integrate peer-led education into the formal curriculum.

We were invited to the University of Oslo to present our experiences and help them to integrate peer-led education into the formal curriculum.

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  • 1. Reflections on Student-led Medical Education Patrik Bachtiger Sindhu B Naidu Tanmay Kanitkar Owain Donnelly Vruti Dattani
  • 2. It wouldn’t be a talk on Education without some objectives… At the end of this lecture, you will: • Understand the concept of student-led teaching • Outline how to set up and teach a workshop, lecture or OSCE • List some reasons why YOU should get involved • Our experiences • BREAK (we’ve been told there might be food?!) • Quick demonstration
  • 3. Where have we come from? • UCL Medical School • Founded 1834 • Campus in Central London’s Bloomsbury • 6-year course, 330 students per year • Continually developing curriculum
  • 4. What is student-led Medical Education? • Medical students sharing knowledge and skills amongst themselves. • Usually restricted to social groups or passed down from seniors • Rarely beyond the scale of small groups
  • 5. UCLU Medical Society TREASURER Vice President PRESIDENT SECRETARY Vice President Academics Section Chairs and SubCommittees Enterprise and Critical care & Anaesthetics Debating Global Medicine General Medicine Medical Leadership & Management O&G Oncology Orthopaedics Paediatrics Psychiatry Radiology Research SportsMedicine Neurology Innovation Research Chair of Education
  • 6. Cooperation not competition • Student-led teaching not suitable for running an entire curriculum • Works best alongside formal teaching, with support from senior staff
  • 7. The blind leading the blind? Evidence for peer-led teaching Article Country Some keys points A systematic review of peer teaching and learning in clinical education Australia and 4 other countries • Students have many benefits from teaching and learning, such as cognitive improvement Birmingham, UK • Students enjoy peer teaching and think that their peers are good teachers • 99% of students prefer peers to clinicians • Student teachers develop useful and transferable skills St George’s, West Indies • Students’ knowledge improve after peer tutoring • 100% of peer tutors would recommend this experience to their colleagues USA • Students have more “cognitive congruence”: they can tailor their explanations better • Students are more approachable teachers Denmark • A RCT comparing students and associate professors found that students teaching skills were comparable to or exceeding that of the professors Germany • Student tutors performed better at exams • Students need only a small amount of training to be as good as learned doctors in teaching Netherlands, USA • There are many good reasons, and a lot of evidence from literature and from practice, to incorporate peer teaching into the curriculum - Secomb, 2008 Peer-led training and assessment in basic life support for healthcare students: synthesis of literature review and fifteen years practical experience. - Harvey et al., 2012 A peer-led supplemental tutorial project for medical physiology: implementation in a large class - Kibble, 2009 Understanding the experience of being taught by peers: the value of social and cognitive congruence. - Lockspeiser et al., 2008. Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills. - Tolsgaard et al., 2007 Evaluation of the peer teaching program at the University children´s hospital Essen – a single center experience. - Büscher et al., 2013. Peer teaching in medical education: twelve reasons to move from theory to practice. - Cate & Durning, 2007.
  • 8. Some themes from the literature 1. Degree of qualification doesn’t correlate to quality as a teacher 2. Students often prefer to be taught by their peers 3. Academic improvement of both parties 4. Cognitive congruence
  • 9. Our contributions so far • • • IAMSE 2013, St Andrews, Scotland AMEE 2013, Prague, Czech Republic FRAMPEIK 2013, Oslo, Norway 
  • 10. The contribution you could make • Great opportunity to further strengthen evidence-base • Students positively welcomed at conferences • Potential advantages in later careers
  • 11. EVERYTHING CLEAR SO FAR?
  • 12. 2012-13 Timetable WIWIHK Part 2 KEY WIWIHK Part 1 Lecture Clinical Data Interpretation EXAMS! Y1+2 OSCE OSCE Workshop MOSCE Workshop OSCE Sept 2012 Jan 2013 Case-based lecture series June/ July 2013
  • 13. Lecture WIWIHK Part 1 Sept 2012 EXAMS! WIWIHK Part 2 Jan 2013 Case-based lecture series June/ July 2013 • 2 tutors • 100-150 students • Usually 1-2 hours • Venue: Lecture theatre
  • 14. FOUR EXAMPLE TITLE SLIDES
  • 15. Workshop - Chest x-rays - Full blood count - Liver function, and urea & electrolytes - ECGs - Histories -Explaining procedures -Ethics & law -Epidemiology Clinical Data Interpretation Sept 2012 EXAMS! OSCE Workshop Jan 2013 • 2 tutors • 20-30 students • Usually 30-45 mins • Venue: Classroom/seminar room June/ July 2013
  • 16. OSCE practice Y1+2 OSCE YEAR 1+2 Sept 2012 Jan 2013 EXAMS! June/ July 2013 YEAR 4 MOSCE • 2 tutors per station • 4 students per station • Venue: Clinical skills lab EXAMS!
  • 17. ANY QUESTIONS???
  • 18. The Journey… Niche in curriculum identified... Event Planning Recruitment of Tutors Room Bookings PUBLICITY !
  • 19. Nearly there… T – 3 weeks: • Content vetted by medical school T – 2 weeks: 3 weeks prior: Event ready… T – 1 week: • Final adjustments • Adjustments • Final copy send to Committee • Supplementary materials • PRACTICE Date of Event: Successful delivery!
  • 20. The Journey… Niche in curriculum identified... Event Planning Recruitment of Tutors Room Bookings PUBLICITY ! Lecturebased Classroombased GREAT SUCCESS OSCE
  • 21. It can feel like this sometimes…. ….But that’s not to say it isn’t totally worth it!!!
  • 22. A team-based approach  None of our events were delivered by a single teacher  Good variation of stimulus for students  In preparing we would learn from each other
  • 23. Insert picture of success
  • 24. How do we know what we did was actually any good?
  • 25. Quality of teaching “Lecturers are extremely knowledgeable and have given good time to improving examination technique. They encourage student participation and can answer questions confidently.” “Case studies were brilliant and lecture taught in a useful and logical manner.” “Clear objectives, good focus on what students need to know for exams.”
  • 26. Student improvement “Good summary of what we should know.” “Very friendly students, made me feel comfortable to ask questions.”
  • 27. Student improvement “Good summary of what we should know.” “Very friendly students, made me feel comfortable to ask questions.”
  • 28. End of year survey “I don't know what I would do without the Medsoc education teaching! Really highlights what we need to know + what is most important both for exams and patient safety. Thank you!!”
  • 29. End of year survey “Medsoc has been far superior in all aspects of teaching. It is more concise and better focused and relevant than anything the med school provides on Moodle.” “Probably the most useful guidance with the curriculum came from Medsoc.”
  • 30. Benefits for you! Consolidate knowledge Useful for exams Develop teaching skills Build confidence Research Résumé/CV Fun!
  • 31. VIL DU BLI STUDENTFORELESER? • Enthusiasm • Knowledge • Dedication • Confidence • Know your limits • Preparation and practice
  • 32. It wouldn’t be a talk on Education without some objectives… At the end of this lecture, you will: • Understand the concept of student-led teaching • Outline how to set up and teach a workshop, lecture or OSCE • List some reasons why YOU should get involved • Our experiences • BREAK (we’ve been told there might be food?!) • Quick demonstration