Japan Smart Living / Smart CitiesSue Kinoshita19 October 2012UNCLASSIFIED
The smart opportunity   Recovery efforts from the March 2011 disaster are encouraging Japan to    rethink its energy poli...
The smartcities  Tokyo...     Largest mega city in the world.     Rapidly aging population / declining birth rate.     ...
Other smart cities   • Yokohama City - Kanagawa Prefecture   • Yokohama City - Kanagawa Prefecture   • Kashiwa City - Chib...
Buildings & environment Key drivers      Strong regulatory body support and collaboration with developed nations.      N...
Energy   Issues          Japan moving away from nuclear          Strong EV industry          Mature energy infrastructu...
Transportation  Issues         Train congestion         Expensive parking         Aging society  Key drivers         C...
Other areas               Issues                     More frequent use of medical services                     Elderly p...
Recent successes         SmartGridGB / NEDO MOU-signing in March to facilitate greater          collaboration between the...
Upcoming opportunities to visit Japan  Smart Technology Trade Mission (January 2013)  Benefits      Network with Japan’s ...
Thanks for listening  Any questions?                         Feel free to contact me directly at:                         ...
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Japan smart living smart cities presentation by sue kinoshita director ukti japan

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UKTI Presentation given at the Practical Toolkit for Doing Business In South East Asia event at The Oval Kia, London on 18 October 2012.

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  • Sustainable energy supply in Japan has reached new urgency amid the ongoing recovery from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster. Japan is rethinking its energy policies, including potentially phasing out nuclear power, dramatically increasing renewables and, importantly, also investing substantially in smart grids/metering and sensor technologies to monitor and collect energy data. The Japanese Government released an interim report in 2011 from the Information Economy Committee of the Industrial Structure Council, noting that through the progress of digitisation and networking of various products and services, existing business fields and service categories have collapsed. In their place, a new competitive structure has emerged in which information technologies and existing industries are united. The Committee suggested the creation of a "Smart Convergence" strategy and proposed action plans for six priority areas and five cross-cutting issues. “ Smart Community” was identified as one of the six priority areas (the others being Smart Healthcare, Robots, Automobile Traffic System, Smart Agriculture, Contents and Creative Business) and one of the five cross-cutting policy challenges was “Global Business Development by International Alliances .
  • Tokyo Greater Tokyo is the largest mega city in the world. Population is 35 million in the Greater Tokyo area and 13 million in Tokyo Prefecture. Population is rapidly ageing in Tokyo due to longer life and smaller number of children. 65 years old or older accounted for 20% in 2009 and it will increase to 27% in 2020. The population is expected to reduce from around 2020. Tokyo Prefecture is the largest economy in Japan which accounts for about 15% of the national budget. The budget size is equivalent to Finland and larger than Czech Republic. Tokyo Prefecture spends about 20% of total expenditures for education and culture. Due to ageing society, expenditures for welfare and healthcare has been increasing. Other cities Osaka is 2 nd largest economy in Japan – and the Greater Osaka region is home to many of Japan’s leaders in ‘Smart ‘ technology . The only two functioning large scale smart grid demonstration sites at Mitsubishi Electric factories are nearby in Amagasaki (Hyogo Prefecture) and Wakayama Prefecture. Other cities such as Nagoya, Sapporo, Kyoto and Fukuoka all large cities sharing same challenges and present the same ‘smart’ opportunities as the capital.  Many of these cities have economies bigger than some other regional countries.
  • Yokohama City - Kanagawa Pref. (pop: 3.7m) Plan to conduct large scale energy management with 4,000 households in 3 areas covering commercial, residential and industrial buildings. Kashiwa City - Chiba pref / tokyo commuter town (pop: 405k) Efficient usage of unused energy starting 2014 Chemical-less town target to reduce chemical allergies Toyota City - Aichi Pref (pop: 420k) Aim to achieve over 60% self supply of energy requirements by installing solar power generation, fuel cells, heat pumps, storage batteries and next generation vehicles Kansai Science City - Kyoto Pref. Developed as a national project in 1987 for new creative development. Plan to achieve more efficient energy use and maximise usage of renewable energy by connecting homes, buildings and EVs for exchanging data with power grid system. Kitakyushu City Fukuoka Pref. (pop: 974k) Plan to conduct energy management that effectively use regional energy sources by producing energy from waste heat and hydrogen available at nearby factories.
  • Issues: The after effect of the March 2011 earthquake near Tokyo may not be as forceful as on other cities or provinces. Many reconstruction projects are not expected to take place immediately but... Key drivers Strong regulatory body support, constantly collaborating with other developed countries for exchange of knowledge. The reconstruction market after the March 2011 earthquake provides an appropriate timing of introducing building-related technologies. * Green Roof Systems - to tackle urban heat island effect
  • ENERGY Issues Need to look for alternate safer sources of energy in wake of nuclear disaster Prepare the grid to enable integration of cutting edge technologies such as electric vehicles. Key drivers Mature energy infrastructure which is well positioned for integration of advanced technologies and modernisation. Opportunities Smart energy management grid development, demand-side management, smart storage, etc where the UK’s power engineering sector might have something to offer.  *NOTE Current demonstration projects in Japan have been on a relatively small scale, hence interest in finding UK cities for larger-scale initiatives
  • Issues Train congestion improving but, still more congested then other major global cities such as London or New York. High costs for car ownership due to expensive parking. Aging society. Key drivers Car sharing which provides car usage without owing cars Intelligent Transport System (ITS) which makes transportation more seamless and less stressful. Opportunities IEV (electric vehicles) Car Sharing provides environmentally friendly mobility solution Smart Way (ITS Spot Services) unifies car navigation and Electric Toll Collection (ETC)
  • HEALTH Issues Heavy usage of medical services and rising demand on long-term medical care. Japanese people more frequently use medical services compared to other countries. The number of elderly people who need long-term care is rapidly increasing, particularly for people aged 75 years old and older. Key drivers Healthcare smart solutions is made available through its best healthcare infrastructure in the world with extensive innovations in engineering and ICT. With the backing of academia and industry heavyweights it aims to present a smart city model leveraging on robotics and telemedicine. Opportunities Healthcare Consumer-Based Robotics Telehomecare – Extension of Telemedicine Applications DIGITAL MEDIA Issues Tokyo has an extremely sophisticated communications market, but the sector is dominated by local companies who are relatively hesitant to contract foreign companies. Key drivers Japan has the highest mobile broadband penetration rate in the world next to South Korea, and nearly all homes have high-speed broadband access. The presence of major manufacturers such as NEC, Toshiba and Fujitsu facilitate the development of smart solutions in the country. Opportunities 4G Network Deployment Cloud Computing EDUCATION Issues It is critical to educate students to be successful globally. Number of students has been decreasing due to reducing child population. Competition among universities to get students is increasing. Key drivers Universities and special schools which have unique curricula and features. Distance learning or virtual universities which do not restrict students geographically. Opportunities Open University of Japan provides distance learning Eco School promotes environmentally friendly school facilities
  • SmartGrid GB and NEDO MOU SGGB signed an MoU with the Japan Smart Community Alliance with the aim of facilitating greater collaboration between the UK and Japan in smart grid development. The signing ceremony was attended by the Chairman of NEDO (the Japanese equivalent of the Technology Strategy Board) and was marked by a video speech from UK Energy Minister, Charles Hendry MP. The Minister’s speech offered a wholehearted endorsement of SGGB and the government’s support for our work. E-HEALTH A British healthcare software developer commissioned the Embassy to identify potential Japanese distributors. Its healthcare software products enable the smooth exchange of patients’ medical imaging data. A suitable distributor was found and in August 2011 the software went live at the Osaka University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals.
  • Japan smart living smart cities presentation by sue kinoshita director ukti japan

    1. 1. Japan Smart Living / Smart CitiesSue Kinoshita19 October 2012UNCLASSIFIED
    2. 2. The smart opportunity  Recovery efforts from the March 2011 disaster are encouraging Japan to rethink its energy policies.  Additional pressure as aging and shrinking population puts mounting pressure on welfare / healthcare spending & systems.  With digitisation and networking replacing existing business fields / service categories with a new competitive structure, the Japanese government’s "Smart Convergence" strategy highlights international alliances covering six priority areas: Smart Smart Smart Creative Community Healthcare Industry Smart Smart Smart Automobile Traffic Systems Agriculture RobotsUNCLASSIFIED
    3. 3. The smartcities Tokyo...  Largest mega city in the world.  Rapidly aging population / declining birth rate.  Largest economy in Japan (15% of national budget)  20% of total expenditure on education and culture, increasing expenditure on welfare and healthcare. ...and beyond  Osaka 2nd largest economy in Japan.  Greater Osaka region home to many of Japan’s smart tech leaders.  Other large cities such as Nagoya, Sapporo, Kyoto and Fukuoka share similar challenges and opportunities.UNCLASSIFIED
    4. 4. Other smart cities • Yokohama City - Kanagawa Prefecture • Yokohama City - Kanagawa Prefecture • Kashiwa City - Chiba Prefecture • Kashiwa City - Chiba Prefecture • Toyota City - Aichi Prefecture • Toyota City - Aichi Prefecture • Kansai Science City - Kyoto Prefecture • Kansai Science City - Kyoto Prefecture • Kitakyushu City Fukuoka Prefecture • Kitakyushu City -- Fukuoka PrefectureUNCLASSIFIED
    5. 5. Buildings & environment Key drivers  Strong regulatory body support and collaboration with developed nations.  Need for building-related technologies to aid post-March 2011 reconstruction. Specific opportunities include  Energy Management Systems (EMS)  Green Roof Systems HEMS - Home Energy Management System BEMS - Building Energy Management System CEMS - Cluster/Community Energy Management System HEMS & BEMS illustration. Source: Pacific Gas & Electric CompanyUNCLASSIFIED
    6. 6. Energy Issues  Japan moving away from nuclear  Strong EV industry  Mature energy infrastructure  Monolithic power providers  Plans to reform supply chain Opportunities  Smart energy management  Grid development  Demand-side management  Smart storage  Tie-ups with Japanese companies for UK demonstration projects Photo: SmartGrid GB and NEDO MOU signingUNCLASSIFIED
    7. 7. Transportation Issues  Train congestion  Expensive parking  Aging society Key drivers  Car sharing  Intelligent Transport System (ITS) Photo: Nissan Leaf, British Embassy Tokyo Opportunities  IEV (electric vehicles) car sharing  Unified car navigation and Electric Toll Collection (ETC)UNCLASSIFIED
    8. 8. Other areas Issues  More frequent use of medical services  Elderly population in need of long-term care Opportunities  Healthcare Consumer-Based Robotics HEALTH  Telehomecare Issues  Dominated by local companies Opportunities  4G Network Deployment  Cloud Computing DIGITAL MEDIA Issues  Need for “globally literate” workforce  Declining child population Opportunities EDUCATION  Distance learning  Environmentally-friendly school facilitiesUNCLASSIFIED
    9. 9. Recent successes  SmartGridGB / NEDO MOU-signing in March to facilitate greater collaboration between the UK and Japan in smart grid development.  A British healthcare software developer was chosen by Osaka University Hospital to deliver an e-health product that would enable the smooth exchange of patients’ medical imaging data.  As Japan’s conventional value chain structure changes, there has been growing interest in UK’s expertise in deregulation. Japanese organisations have already identified a major UK city as a large-scale demonstration project.UNCLASSIFIED
    10. 10. Upcoming opportunities to visit Japan Smart Technology Trade Mission (January 2013) Benefits  Network with Japan’s leading companies in electronics, communications, software, system integration and energy, as well as consultancies involved in smart technology and smart grid businesses.  Presentation opportunity at seminars in Tokyo and Osaka (TBC).  Pre-mission readiness consultation with Technology officers in Japan.  Pre-mission publicity in Japan (>1500 mailshots).  Simultaneous interpretation provided at seminars.  Publicity via mission brochure.  Identification of business opportunities in Japan.  Tour of ENEX and Smart Energy 2013, with interpreters provided.UNCLASSIFIED
    11. 11. Thanks for listening Any questions? Feel free to contact me directly at: sue.kinoshita@fco.gov.uk Alternatively, please email Gary Middlemas Head Marketing team at: exporttojapan@fco.gov.ukUNCLASSIFIED
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