1330 mon alsh1 mc nab jenkins
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  • At a time of declining library budgets the use of all e-content must be maximised. Mobile interfaces and apps have the potential to provide access to subscription e-content on-the go, in addition to providing improved accessibility. However, this is not a seamless process and publishers, librarians and end users face different barriers and challenges. The presenters look forward to sharing their experiences with those of other librarians and with publishers.RJ and AM – background in HE libraries but both have backgrounds working with JISC Collections on content negotiation.
  • At a time of declining library budgets the use of all e-content must be maximised. Mobile interfaces and apps have the potential to provide access to subscription e-content on-the go, in addition to providing improved accessibility. However, this is not a seamless process and publishers, librarians and end users face different barriers and challenges. The presenters look forward to sharing their experiences with those of other librarians and with publishers.
  • The NMC Horizon Project is a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years around the globe. The six technologies featured in the NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition are placed along three adoption horizons that indicate likely timeframes for their entrance into mainstream use for teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. The near-term horizon assumes the likelihood of entry into the mainstream for higher education institutions within the next twelve months. Mobile apps are the fastest growing dimension of the mobile space in higher education right now, with impacts on virtually every aspect of informal life, and increasingly, every discipline in the university. Always-connected Internet devices using 3G 6 NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Editionand similar cellular networks, imbedded sensors, cameras, and GPS have proved to be a feature set with hundreds of thousands of applications. Appsthat take advantage of recent developments in these tools, along with advances in electronic publishing and the convergence of search technology andlocation awareness, made this category of software enormously interesting in a higher education context. Higher education institutions are now designing apps tailored to educational and research needs across the curriculum.Tablet computing presents new opportunities to enhance learning experiences in ways simply not possible with other devices. High-resolution screens allow users of tablets, such as the iPad, to easily share content with each other and pore over images and videos on the screen. As people tend to use tablets to supplement and not replace smartphones, they are viewed as less disruptive tools (no phone ringing and no incoming text messages), which makes them ideal tools for learning opportunities. Because tablets are able to tap into all the advantages that mobile apps bring to smaller devices, but in a larger format, higher education institutions are seeing them not just as an affordable solution for one-to-one learning, but also as a feature-rich tool for field and lab work, often times replacing far more expensive and cumbersome devices and equipment.Gartner and Cisco stats from:The Future of Apps and Web by Janna Anderson & Lee Rainie [Pew Internet, Mar 23 2012]An estimated 10 billion mobile Internet devices by 2016 (with world pop of est 7.3 billion that is 1.4 devices per person on the planet) [Cisco] Why engage with the handheld delivery of e-content? mobile access to the Internet is a common part of the student experience at a time of declining library budgets the use of all e-resources must be maximisedmobile interfaces offer great accessibility for Visually Impaired Persons as well as others with Specific Learning Differences.
  • [Loughborough applicants are probably above average in terms of affluence and gadget ownership]
  • Different types of e-content – accessed on different devices. Leisure, professional and academic e-booksJournal bundles from publishers (egSciVerse from Elsevier or PsycArticles)A & I services – subject-specific or multi-disciplinary (may incorporate publisher-specific full-text eg Emerald and IEEE Xplore)Full-text databases – from single publisher (egPsycArticles) or many (eg EBSCO “...Source Complete” range)Also created content: repositories – mainly text but increasingly multimediaAugmented reality and augmented events (conferences and exhibitions)Tools to deliver and manipulate e-content:Discovery Systems (the Google search box)Reference Management SoftwareBut are they integrated?Should publishers / aggregators aim for mobile websites or apps?Futurist John Smart, founder of the Acceleration Studies Foundation, looks beyond 2020 and sees apps as merely a passing phase in Internet evolution. “Apps are a great intermediate play, a way to scale up functionality of a primitive Web,” he said, “but over time they get outcompeted for all but the most complex platforms by simpler and more standardized alternatives. What will get complex will be the ‘artificial immune systems’ on local machines. What will get increasingly transparent and standardized will be the limited number of open Web platforms and protocols that all the leading desktop and mobile hardware and their immune systems will agree to use. The rest of the apps and their code will reside in the long tail of vertical and niche uses.” [The Future of Apps and Web - Pew Internet, March 2012]
  • Three key stakeholders with different relationships:Many users (apart from switched-on researchers) can be publisher-blind (they just want the content)Librarians may see themselves fitting naturally in the middle and truly believe they understand the user context more completelyPublishers wish relationships with both librarians and users; increased personalisation and mobile options mean that user relationships are far easier to establish than before
  • Choosing to focus on apps from single (society) publishersOn campus:Access to full-textCan ‘Save Locally’ to view later (off campus or wherever)Off campus:You are presented with a login screen if you try to access full-textYou can login with your AIP username and password, if you are a member of AIP
  • On campus:Access to full-textOff campus:You are presented with a login screen if you try to access full-textYou can login with your ACS username and password, if you are a member of ACSYou can purchase/rent the content ($35 for 48 hours)There is a Login Via Your Home Institution option (but Loughborough isn’t in the list, presumably because we don’t yet have Shibboleth or SAML-compliant FAM)FAQs say that you can access full-text via your institution’s VPN, but I haven’t managed to get this to work
  • They may suit senior academics who · have a small number of preferred journals · know who publishes those journals· are willing to browse through tables of contents· are happy to download particular papers for reading on the go These mobile apps offer a similar experience to print journals! (downloading being similar to photocopying articles to read on the train)This does not suit early career researchers and undergraduates who· are more likely to have smartphones· expect to be able to read content on the go· need to be able to do a subject search to find articles· do not know what the best journals are· do not know who publishes what· are less likely to plan ahead
  • Three key stakeholders with different relationships:Many users (apart from switched-on researchers) can be publisher-blind (they just want the content)Librarians may see themselves fitting naturally in the middle and truly believe they understand the user context more completelyPublishers wish relationships with both librarians and users; increased personalisation and mobile options mean that user relationships are far easier to establish than before
  • Conclusions: Identify key themes which haveemergedWill collate comments and make them available on the UKSG conference site alongside our slides (probably after Easter!)The UKSG conference is an event which leads to many meaningful discussions - today in this workshop we have had useful conversations and hopefully learned from each other. Publishers and librarians are partners in making content available to end-users. The better we understand each other – and our respective strengths and limitations – the better we will truly mobilise and maximise the use of our e-content.At a time of declining library budgets the use of all e-content must be maximised. Mobile interfaces and apps have the potential to provide access to subscription e-content on-the go, in addition to providing improved accessibility. However, this is not a seamless process and publishers, librarians and end users face different barriers and challenges. The presenters look forward to sharing their experiences with those of other librarians and with publishers.

1330 mon alsh1 mc nab jenkins 1330 mon alsh1 mc nab jenkins Presentation Transcript

  • UKSG 35th Annual ConferenceMobilising your e-content for maximum impact Ruth Jenkins & Alison McNab @rjlib @AlisonMcNab Session hashtag: #MobiContent
  • Outline Aims Context Examples Barriers and challenges Conclusions
  • ContextDeclining budgetsDemonstrating valueMaximising subscription e-contentAccessibility
  • Why mobile matters There are 5.3 billion global mobile subscribers: 77% of world’s population [International Telecommunications Union] An estimated 1 billion smartphones will be sold in 2014 [Gartner Group] An estimated 10 billion mobile Internet devices by 2016 (with world pop of est 7.3 billion) [Cisco] Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition  Time-to-Adoption Horizon: One Year or Less: - Mobile Apps / Tablet Computing
  • Loughborough UG applicantsMarket research survey carried out in 2011, foundthat:• 98.5% of the sample of potential applicants had mobile phones• About 46 % of these mobile phones were smartphones: • 12% Android • 17% iPhone • 17% iPhone
  • Mobilising e-content Mobile websites or apps? full-text A& Ie-books journals databases services
  • Barriers and challengesPublishers Librarians Users
  • American Institute of Physics
  • American Chemical Society
  • Publisher apps are great but… Users have to know who publishes the journals they read & download the right app They are often designed for browsing Need to link with resource discovery (e.g. Primo, Summon) & reference management (EndNote, RefWorks) software May not be available for all platforms Off-campus access is limited (so not a truly mobile service!)
  • Primo mobile There is a cut-down version of Primo designed for use on mobile phones But it only contains the Library Catalogue, not the full ‘Library Catalogue Plus’ (so the resource discovery element based on Metalib/SFX is missing) So people have to use the full web interface to access the full range of content
  • Barriers and challengesPublishers Librarians Users
  • Over to you What are the challenges to mobilising your e-content? What are the barriers? Write comments on post-it notes Please identify whether you are a publisher or a librarian
  • UKSG 35th Annual Conference Thank you!Ruth Jenkins Alison McNabLoughborough University De Montfort UniversityR.Jenkins@lboro.ac.uk AMcNab@dmu.ac.uk #MobiContent