Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The role of bioenergy in Britain, Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen

94

Published on

By Prof Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen …

By Prof Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen
Presented at 'UK Energy System in Transition: Technology, Infrastructure and Investment'; an event organised by the UK Energy Research Centre, ClimateXChange and the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation, on Tuesday 1 April 2014, 14.00-17.00, in Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Published in: Environment
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
94
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The role of bioenergy in Britain UK Energy System in Transition: Technology, Infrastructure and Investment, Edinburgh, 1st April 2014 *pete.smith@abdn.ac.uk Pete Smith1*, Andrew Lovett2, Jon Finch3, Dominic Moran4, Gail Taylor5, Eric Casella6, Simon Taylor7, Steven Firth7, Shifeng Wang1, Peter Alexander4, Chao Wang7, Astley Hastings1, Mat Tallis5, Gilla Sunnenberg2, Jon Hillier1, David Allinson7, Mohammed Quddus7, James Morison6 & Iwona Cisowska3
  • 2. Areas unsuitable for energy crops
  • 3. Areas unsuitable for energy crops
  • 4. Areas unsuitable for energy crops
  • 5. Biomass supply from energy crops Current conditions
  • 6. Biomass supply from energy crops Future conditions 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 12.5 13.0 2010 2020 2030 2050 MxgMg/ha High Medium Low
  • 7. Biomass supply from energy crops Highest yield Exclusion SRF Miscanthus SRC
  • 8. Biomass supply from energy crops Dry Matter Yield Mg ha-1 24
  • 9. 10% of UK land area accounts for approx. 90% of the heat demand from homes Non-heat energy demandHeat energy demand
  • 10. Change in non-heat energy demand – 2009-2050 Change in heat energy demand – 2009-2050
  • 11. Where is bioenergy economically viable to meet demand? Using an optimisation model to match supply and demand – where is it economic (from an energy price perspective) to meet demand with bioenergy?
  • 12. Where is bioenergy economically viable to meet demand? Projections out to 2050 – no consideration of farm scale economics Miscanthus SRC
  • 13. Where is it viable to grow energy crops? At a Miscanthus price of £60 odt-1 and an SRC price of £48 odt- 1, energy crops could supply around 50 Pj yr-1 (=1.6 Gw yr-1) in GB. Relatively small increases in price, the area (and thereby the potential energy supplied by biomass) increases dramatically.
  • 14. 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 35.0 40.0 45.0 Average % of Cropland used for Miscanthus or SRC in Future Climate Scenarios Lower Prices Variant Higher Prices Variant Environmental impacts of energy crops Considerable regional variation in energy crop planting compared to the national average rate
  • 15. 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 900,000 SRC Miscanthus Environmental impacts of energy crops Over time and with increased climate change the proportion of Miscanthus planting is likely to increase and SRC decline.
  • 16. Environmental impacts of energy crops Soil carbon change from planted area
  • 17. Greenhouse gas emissions from planted area Miscanthus SRC Environmental impacts of energy crops
  • 18. Environmental impacts of energy crops Projections out to 2050 Miscanthus SRC Miscanthus SRC
  • 19. Conclusions • Energy crops can help to meet energy demands, but feasibility depends of price paid for feedstock • The location of the nearest power plant is critical - more distributed power generation infrastructure is needed • Distribution will vary between regions and through time • Environmental impacts vary – soil carbon may increase or decrease, and GHG emissions from crop management varies among crops. • Special issue of Global Change Biology Bioenergy published in February 2014.

×