Designing User Experience

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This was presented as part of User Experience Coaching program conducted, for a product development firm in India. Who wished to initiate and implement, UCD for their Agile Development Framework.

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Designing User Experience

  1. 1. May 2008Design is Science and ArtBuilding a Vision for User-Centered DesignSandeep Rathod, User Experience Architect.This presentation is an introduction to User-Centered Designprocess and understanding the scientific principles applied to it.We will learn about:  User Centered Design  Design Fundamentals  Technical Considerations  Design in Practice
  2. 2. May 2008Quick IntroductionSandeep Rathod, User Experience ArchitectMumbai, Bangalore | India.Sandeep has over 9 yrs of experience in applyingUser Experience(UX/UE) principles and UserCentered UI development process forenterprise, SAAS and eCommerce softwareproducts, for internet browser, touch pads, anddesktops.He has directed and lead the efforts for UserExperience initiatives to develop UX/UE centricprocess to be incorporated to SAP, and CustomDevelopment frameworks, including UsabilityTesting, UI Design and Standardization, IterativeRapid Prototype Development, Visualizations. Whilehave successfully lead and managed team of user
  3. 3. May 2008User Centered Design
  4. 4. User-Centered Design (UCD) is Science and Arts• Science: Includes levels of objectivity • Art: Includes levels of subjectivity • Applies research findings from • Aesthetics behavioral and computer science • Users feelings and emotions • Leverages observation and testing methodologies • Incorporates data gathering and analysis techniques
  5. 5. A Scientific Principles Applied to UCD Cognitive ProcessingVIMM System: Visual Intellect Memory Motor Let me• Visual - Optimize visual comprehension click here• Intellect - Simplify decision making• Memory - Minimize memory load• Motor - Minimize movement time Visual Design Motor Response
  6. 6. A Scientific Principles Applied to UCD VIMM: Natural Response Mappings in product design
  7. 7. A Scientific Principles Applied to UCD VIMM: Natural Response Mappings in product design
  8. 8. Defining User Centered Design • The active involvement of users • Clear understanding of user and task requirements • Allocation of function between users and technology • Iteration of design solutionsInternationalOrganization for • Multi-Disciplinary DesignStandardization
  9. 9. Characteristics of Usable InterfacesUsable interfaces are: • Easy to learn and remember • Consistent • Intuitive, self-evidence – encourage and reward experimentation • Efficient – workload reduction • Prevents errors, anticipate and forgives mistakes • Provides appropriate feedback • Are satisfying and fun to use
  10. 10. Benefits of Usable Interface Design• Reduced User skills• Reduced training• Increased user / job satisfaction• Increased product recognition and loyalty• Increased cost savings and profitability
  11. 11. What happens if UCD occurs late in the design process? • The freedom to design is high in the beginning, when we know the least • Getting smart early allows us to incorporate good ideas before the interface is frozen
  12. 12. Late UCD – More Hidden Costs Increased Downstream Costs Training & Help Desk Product Revision Implementation Detailed Design UI Structure User/task Analysis Run through these steps Investment in resources
  13. 13. Early UCD – Fewer Hidden Costs Reduced Downstream Costs Training & Help Desk Product Revision Implementation Detailed Design UI Structure Proactive User Centered User/task Analysis Analysis Investment in resources
  14. 14. Summary - User Centered Design • VIMM – a scientific principle applied to UCD • Natural Response Mapping • Definition of UCD • Characteristic of Usable Interfaces • Benefits of Usable Designs
  15. 15. May 2008Design Fundamentals
  16. 16. Design Fundamentals • Navigation • Presentation • Content • Interaction
  17. 17. Design Fundamentals - Navigation • Usable navigation tells users where they are • Usable navigation shows users where they can go • Usable navigation shows users how to get back • Usable navigation provides users with alternatives • Usable navigation is obvious • Usable navigation matches users mental models
  18. 18. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical • Persistent • Sequential • Contextual • Search • Mixed-Model Navigation
  19. 19. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Hierarchical or Drill-down navigation is appropriate when individual tasks must be completed or terminated • Persistent before other can begin • Sequential • Contextual • Single-level menus • Search • Multi-level menus • Mixed-Model • “Down and back”, modal access
  20. 20. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Persistent navigation is appropriate when the user tends to jump between related tasks within the same • Persistent workflow • Sequential • Contextual • Global Navigation • Search • Button Bars & Tabs • Mixed-Model • List Menu (Tree View, Rollover cascading) • Random, non-modal access
  21. 21. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Sequential navigation models are used to provide structure to procedural or step-by-step tasks. • Persistent • Sequential • Explicit navigation path • Contextual • Wizards • Search • Either modal or non-modal • Mixed-Model
  22. 22. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Contextual navigation provides direct access to related • Persistent content from application pages within the hierarchy • Sequential • Contextual • Search • Mixed-Model
  23. 23. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Search models provides direct access to a results set • Persistent based on criteria entered. • Sequential This is the most efficient form of navigation for “known item” scenarios • Contextual • Simple Search • Search • Faceted Search • Mixed-Model • Advanced Search
  24. 24. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Navigation Models • Hierarchical Often, navigation models must be combined to fully • Persistent meet users expectations • Sequential • How many navigation models should be used? • Contextual • How many items? • Search • Change over time? • Mixed-Model • Move between frequently? • Done to completion? • Sequence?
  25. 25. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Approach For Application Design • For Application Task Flows Drive Navigation Flow • Expose Main Section and Task Initiation Points
  26. 26. Design Fundamentals –Navigation: Approach For Application Design • Multiple window Navigation • Use to • Perform a secondary task • Provides more detailed information • Provides access to tool or function • Offer contextual help • Guidelines • Make no more than 70% size of main window and skew to right • Allow only one task at a time • Includes an obvious “Close” button • Caveats • User may loose track of “main” window if too many windows are opened • Be aware of the pop-up blockers
  27. 27. Design Fundamentals - Presentation • Factors contribute to effective presentation design are • Visual-Cognitive Factors • Layout • Color • Graphics • Text
  28. 28. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Visual-Cognitive Processing • Eye movement is the basis of visual processing Human eyes movement is comprised of combinations of: • Fixations – Periods when the eyes stop or hesitate to focus or gaze upon a visual object (e.g.: Full Caps, Indents) • Saccades – Periods when the eyes rapidly scan within the vertical or horizontal planes of the visual field (e.g.: small characters, reading entire line and jumping on to new para)
  29. 29. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Visual-Cognitive Processing • Some of the learnings from the eye tracking research • Most users will scan instead of read • Page flows and text should be designed with culturally appropriate reading patterns in mind • Users visual attention is significantly influenced by visually grouped information • Users look for different design element and patterns in consistent locations • Search • Navigation • Tool bars • Action Buttons
  30. 30. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Visual-Cognitive Processing • Scientific research indicates that the eyes tend to move from: Large to small Size Irregular to regular Shape Dark to light Shade Saturated to unsaturated Color
  31. 31. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Visual-Cognitive Processing • Gestalt Principles Help in control visual context: Size Shape Shade Color Similarity Icons, Buttons, Tabs Proximity Placement of relative areas Common area Containers, easily perceivable groupings Hierarchical navigation choices Connectedness should be applied by designers to reduce visual-cognitive ambiguity
  32. 32. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Visual-Cognitive Processing • Gestalt Principles Help in control visual context: should be applied by designers to reduce visual-cognitive ambiguity
  33. 33. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Layout• Visual Processing is Hierarchical• Visual Design Elements: Points, Lines and Planes, Divided Planes• Grid System: grid system serve as the organizational containers for the overall design• Layout Conventions & Trade-offs: •Display resolution •Alignment points •Data Dense Designs •White space
  34. 34. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Color• Colors are used to communicate branding, primary and secondary navigation, active display controls and detailed information• White light is refracted through a prism to produce the visible color spectrum• Color is used effectively to indicate highlighting or selection• The Brain naturally uses color as a cue to discriminate and group objects• Colors shows relationships within different areas of an application
  35. 35. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: GraphicsGraphic images are• Perceived faster than text• Easily recognizable and remembered• Efficient communication design elementsWell-designed & implemented graphics:• Facilitates user decision making• Communicate function• Present aesthetics and “look and feel”
  36. 36. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Graphics TypesLayout GraphicsNavigation & Controls GraphicsIcons Familiarity & Consistency, Context, Communication of ActionData GraphicsMarketing & E-Commerce
  37. 37. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: TextFont SizeFont StyleFont SpacingFont TreatmentsFont FamiliesLegibilityText AlignmentLine Length
  38. 38. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Text – Font Treatments• Font treatments are most effective • Most Subtle • Only capture attention when necessary • Dimmed text • Italics • Use the „quietest‟ methods first • Underlining • Boldface • Larger Font • Surrounding with white space • Box or borders • Different color • Graphic • Sound • Blinking • Animation • Video • Strongest
  39. 39. Design Fundamentals –Presentation: Text – Font Treatments• Underlining • Reserve the use of underlining to designate hyperlinks• Italics • Avoid using italics in long text blocks• ALL CAPS • Avoid using all caps for running text reading performance degrades 14-20%
  40. 40. Design Fundamentals - Content Printed Document Online Document • Static documents limit movement • Tendency to point, Click • Fixed two-dimension space • Multi-dimensional Space • Strong sense of contextual place • Less sense of place • More content at a glance • Screen considerably smaller • More freedom for layout • Frequent scrolling • Graphics often on separate pages • Graphics can distract user‟s gaze • Resolution set per print standards • Low-resolution – 75 dpi for - typically 600 dpi windows and 96 for MAC • Smaller fonts still readable • Sub-optimal for reading • Much faster than page loads • Page size constrain design • Can use elaborate fonts & Graphics • 5+ seconds page load times cause frustration • No Interaction necessary
  41. 41. Design Fundamentals – Common Content PitfallsObjective writing can be achieved by avoiding common pitfalls to writing: • Triteness • Most readers will quickly lose interest • Avoid using clichés, inappropriate humor, or other distractions • Ambiguity • Readers should always have a clear understanding of what and why a passage of text was written • Overstatement • Overstatement of facts or products features hurts credibility – even if everything else is reasonable • Emotion-laden content • Avoid religious, ethnic, or culturally sensitive content.
  42. 42. Design Fundamentals –Content: PETAny web application or ecommerce web application seek to communicate, motivate andengender their users through persuasion, emotional appeals, and the establishment oftrust. • Persuasion – The ability of a web apps to influence users to make decisions or take action. • Emotion – The ability of a web apps to encourage positive feelings, relationships, and connections between users, communities, and organizations. • Trust – The ability of a web apps to establish user‟s confidence by reinforcing credibility, legitimacy, sincerity, security and good intent.
  43. 43. Design Fundamentals - Interaction Interaction is the point where a visual design is processed (cognition) and human action (motor response) is initiated. • Visual Design • Cognitive Processing Cognitive Processing I think I should click • Motor Response this button… Visual Design Motor Response
  44. 44. Design Fundamentals - Interaction • Effective Visual hinting shows available options, the currently selected state. • Effective Visual Design shows the current interaction “state” (what functions are active) • Pointing devices and keyboards provides users with simple and complex modes of interaction
  45. 45. Design Fundamentals - Interaction • Other Factors that Impact Interaction • Screen flow and sequencing • Appropriate User Interface controls • Meaningful & useful Error and feedback messaging • Delayed response times • Users expectations
  46. 46. Design Fundamentals – Interaction – UI Controls Base the selection of appropriate UI Controls on the task the user is performing, and the most appropriate mechanism to support the action. Data Entry Navigation & Action Selection Text entry field Hypertext link Option (radio) Button Standard Command button Check Box Masked / Protected Standard List Box Multi-line edit Default Simple Combo Box Accelerator keys Drop-Down Standard Pressed in – Sticky Multi-Select Auto-Complete Toolbar Multi- Select w/ check box Spin button Drop-Down menu Multi- Column Editable grid/table Notebook tab Tree View Standard Hierarchical List Sortable by headers Sliders Deferred create Accumulator Complex list or table
  47. 47. Design Fundamentals – Interaction – Error Handling Error Prevention Aided Data Entry, Preview & Confirmation Error Detection Field-level detection & Form-level detection Feedback Embedded error messages, Pop-up error messages, User wait time expectations Error Correction Embedded error messages, Pop-up error messages
  48. 48. Design Fundamentals – Interaction – Error HandlingFeedback: System Response Time Task Example Response Time Continuous, creative task, • Monitoring a process Les than 2 seconds concentration required • Creating an object Local closure exists, task • Searching for a record in 2 to 4 seconds continuous the database Task Closure, work • Request for a report 4 to 15 seconds continuous • Submitting a complex transaction Major task closure, leave • Copy or archiving a large 15 seconds or longer task and return later file
  49. 49. Design Fundamentals – Interaction – Error HandlingFeedback: Managing User Wait Time Expectations Response Time Filling Expectation 2 to 4 seconds • Show an animated hourglass 4 to 15 seconds • Show a progress indicator • Mention users that the task may take several seconds for response Longer than 15 seconds • Show a “Processing..” or “in progress…” indicator
  50. 50. May 2008Technical Considerations
  51. 51. Technological Considerations • Designing for the user experience evolved over time • Early technologies emphasized features and functions • Competition inspired user-centered design • UCD evolved into user experience design • User Experience Design: • More fully draws user into the interaction • Is enabled through the use of new web technologies • Can be more strongly convey underlying brand attributes • Seeks to evoke a more affective (emotional) responses • Considers all channels of interaction with the users and customers • Facilitates more social interaction among peer groups
  52. 52. Technological Considerations – Web 2.0 Web 2.0 is a 2nd generation internet technology whose aim is to facilitate creativity and collaboration among peers. • The essence of Web 2.0 is building applications around the unique feature of the internet • Web 2.0 does not refer to an updated in a technical specification per se, but to changes in the way software developers and end-users uses web.
  53. 53. Technological Considerations – Web 2.0 Web 2.0 includes the following features & techniques: • Simple and catering to focused tasks • Rich internet interactions, often AJAX-based & distinct look and feel • Folksonomies – user-generated taxonomies in the form of tags/tagclouds • Wiki (forum) software and tools – to support user-generated content • CSS to separate presentation from content • Syndication and aggregation of data in RSS feeds • Mashups – merging content from different sources • Weblog publishing tools
  54. 54. Technological Considerations – Web 2.0 Insert some Learning for Web 2.0
  55. 55. Technological Considerations – Evolving User Patterns • User-generated Content • User-generated Design • Social Search • Folksonomies • Blogs • Mashups • Syndicated Content (RSS)
  56. 56. May 2008Design in Practice
  57. 57. Design in Practice – Application Design • Application users must perform tasks efficiently • Applications must surface the most critical tasks • Application tasks are usually performed to completion • Application deliver parcels of functionality to users • Application often involves role-based design • Application Design leverage familiar templates & Elements
  58. 58. Design in Practice – Application Design – CommonTemplates • Dashboard • Account • Task Panel with Central Object • Classic Menu • Notebook Tabs • Wizard • Data Display and Manipulation • Data Exploration • Database Maintenance
  59. 59. Design in Practice – Application Design– Choosing the right application templates • Gather an inventory of existing screens • Create a screen type hierarchy • Map selected templates to new screens • Build the initial prototype
  60. 60. Design in Practice – Application Design– Common Application Design Elements • Navigation bars • Menus (Drop-down, shortcuts & cascading) • Toolbars • Toolbar Elements • Toolboxes • Panels & Panes • Status bars • Tables (Sortable columns & rows)
  61. 61. Design in Practice – Application Design– Flow of Information in design process Focus Group User Insight End user Interview User Goals UI Insight Expert Review Design Goals Stack Holder Business Goals
  62. 62. Design in Practice – Web Design Information Architecture should: • Match the user‟s mental model • Invite entry and deep browsing • Emphasize key tasks and content so that users have a clear starting point. • Keep the number of core tasks small • Personalization allows users to tailor aspects of the interface to their personal preferences • Common default settings or profiles • Change page layout • Select different color scheme • Adjust the Font size
  63. 63. Design in Practice – Web Design Familiar Web Application Templates & Elements are used to: • Accelerate the design process • Reduce user ambiguity • Provide consistency • Serve as the foundation of web design standards and guidelines
  64. 64. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates • High Volume Container • Intranet Portal • Basic Menu • Button Menu • Hypertext Menu • Annotated Menu • Document Template • Search • Rich Index • Table of Contents • Simple Form • Advanced Form
  65. 65. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates High Volume Container • When users are presented with a large amount of content • May want to move randomly through the content • When using this home page, ensure that all information is hierarchically organized and fits into a two-level structure
  66. 66. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Intranet Portal • When users want an integrated interface with a consistent layout for daily tasks and frequently used applications • Want to view the summary of regularly performed tasks • Want to monitor job information • Want a hub to access various organization related resources • Intranet Portals uses the full capabilities of the technical portal architecture, such as personalization, customization and collaboration.
  67. 67. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Intranet Portal • When users want an integrated interface with a consistent layout for daily tasks and frequently used applications • Want to view the summary of regularly performed tasks • Want to monitor job information • Want a hub to access various organization related resources • Intranet Portals uses the full capabilities of the technical portal architecture, such as personalization, customization and collaboration.
  68. 68. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Basic Menu – Button Menu • When users need to navigate from the opening page of an application to a workspace or task • Do not have to move back and forth between functions on the menu • Select from a few categories or menu items (24 Items Max)
  69. 69. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Basic Menu – Hypertext Menu • When users need numerous menu choices that benefit from a compact display • Do not have to move back and forth between functions on the menu • Need to navigate from the opening page of an application to a workspace or task
  70. 70. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Basic Menu – Annotated Menu • When users need menu choices with a brief description of the content or task provided by each menu • Do not have to move back and forth between functions on the menu • Need to navigate from the opening page of an application to a workspace or task
  71. 71. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Document Template When displaying page(s) of information that • Contain text, pictures or multimedia • Offer hypertext links to other pages as shortcuts • Typically, a document page is displayed after selecting a hypertext link which could appear in any type of page
  72. 72. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Search • When users need to search within a large collection of information or links to narrow down choices • Are looking for a specific item by a specific word or search criteria • Provide persistent search in a prominent location • Provide a simple search with a link to a more advanced search Some Research Findings • Younger adults used more key words searches than older adults • Younger adults were more efficient in their searches • Younger adults used advanced search significantly more than older adults • Older adults used direct navigation system (Category Search) over key word search strategies
  73. 73. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Search - Dynamic Menu, Rich Index • When users need to view items from a database table based on search criteria • When providing access to a large body of information • The crux of the task is to find the right piece of information • Menu choices may not display all the required items
  74. 74. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Table of Content • When displaying reference material, text, data or other relatively static information • The item displayed is one of many in a collection • TOC provides a menu available for constant viewing and selection to maintain user orientation while navigating across a wide range of pages
  75. 75. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Simple Form • When users must view, change or occasionally enter data • Need to check and update online records • Occasionally enter “heads-down” information, such as a membership app • To enhance user proficiency and speed, keep Simple Form pages used by the same users consistent across applications
  76. 76. Design in Practice – Web Design - Templates Advanced Form • When users are likely to need to move randomly between pages of a long form • Need to enter data heads-down or when the order or data entry is determined by a paper form
  77. 77. Design in Practice – Web Design - Elements • Login Elements • Search • Content Elements • Breadcrumb Trail • Contextual Navigation
  78. 78. Design in Practice – Accessibility • An estimated 20% of the general population have some form of disability. WebAIM (http://www.webaim.org)
  79. 79. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Disabled Users • Vision • Hearing • Motor • Cognitive
  80. 80. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Disabled Users Vision • Legal blindness • Low vision • Color Blindness Accessibility Barriers • Monitor • Mouse
  81. 81. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Disabled Users Auditory Disability • Profound hearing loss • Conductive hearing loss • Neural hearing loss • Speech and hearing Accessibility Barriers • Audio • Video & Multimedia
  82. 82. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Disabled Users Motor • Spinal chord injuries • Loss or damage limbs • Diseases and congenital conditions • Cerebral palsy • Muscular Dystrophy • Multiple sclerosis • Parkinson‟s disease Accessibility Barriers • Mouse • Keyboards
  83. 83. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Disabled Users Cognitive Disabilities The concept of cognitive disabilities is broad and not well-defined has greater difficulty with one or more types of mental tasks than the average person • Clinical diagnosis • Autism • Down syndrome • Traumatic brain injury • Attention Deficit Disorder • Dyslexia • Functional disabilities • Focus on resulting abilities • Memory • Problem-solving • Attention • Reading, verbal comprehension • Visual comprehension
  84. 84. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Assistive Technology Cognitive Disabilities There are no explicit assistive technologies for those with cognitive disabilities. Web content can be made accessible to those with cognitive disabilities by: • Breaking complex processes into smaller steps (wizards) • Providing supplemental media (illustration, videos) • Building highly structured pages (Headings, Bulleted lists, numbered lists, definition lists) • Using short, simple and unambiguous phrases
  85. 85. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Laws American With Disabilities Act (1990) The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities and requires that places of public accommodation and the services they provide be accessible.
  86. 86. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Laws US Rehabilitation Act (1973) Federal government agencies are required to purchase electronic and information technology (E&IT) goods and services that are fully accessible to those with disabilities.
  87. 87. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Laws International Laws Many countries have established disability anti-discrimination laws. Australia Disability Discrimination Act (1992) Canada Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2002) United Kingdom Disability Discrimination Act (1995)
  88. 88. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Section 508 Guidelines Accessibility standards developed by the US Department of Justice Standards apply to Federal agency Web sites and government contractors Two major sections that apply to HTML – 16 pass/Fail standards Scripts, Plug-ins & Java – 12 written standards
  89. 89. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Best Practice Navigation Presentation Content Interaction
  90. 90. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Best Practice Navigation Label links using keywords that describe the underling content Avoid Redirect Pull-down menus Provide methods to Bypass Navigation links
  91. 91. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Best Practice Presentation Ensure sufficient Visual Contrast – color should provide enough contrast between letters and background – you need a 90% contrast difference between foreground and background in order to read test clearly • All information that uses color to convey a meaning must be available without color • Be sure each label is explicitly associated with the appropriate field • Avoid placing explanatory or instructional text in text edit fields • Use relative instead of Fixed font sizes (em instead of pixel) • As last resort, provide text-only pages with equivalent information and functionality of pages that are not accessible
  92. 92. Design in Practice – Accessibility – Best Practice Content Provide a text equivalent for every non-text element including images, graphical representations of text, image map regions, animations, graphical buttons. Interaction • Ensure that functions using scripts and applets are input device-independent • Following techniques cause problems for people with cognitive disabilities • Blinking • Flickering • Moving content • Automatic page refresh • Auto Redirect • Motor impaired users may struggle with cascading menu rollover targets
  93. 93. What we’ve learned  Use Centred Design Scientific Principle  Characteristic of Usable Interface  Design Fundamentals -Navigation Models -Factors Contributing Effective Presentation -Content -Interaction with UI Controls & Error Handling  Technical Considerations -Web 2.0 -Evolving User Patterns  Design in Practice -Application Design - Common Templates & Elements -Choosing the right application templates -Flow of Information Design Process -Web Design & Accessibility
  94. 94. Thank you!Sandeep Rathod.User Experience ArchitectMumbai | Bangalore | IndiaEmail: sandeeprathod@hotmail.comCell:+91 9916690976 | +91 9920777058Linkedin: http://in.linkedin.com/in/inklingsutra

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