Innovating for Information Literacy Andrew Walsh University of Huddersfield Academic Librarian National Teaching Fellow @a...
Who am I?  A little about me… Chartered (MCLIP) 2007 Innovation Award (UC&R) 2009 LIRG Research Award 2009 National Teachi...
Why innovate?
<ul><li>“… it has been noted by many that library inductions (and orientation) and library instruction have elicited more ...
Why innovate?  Staff and Students are changing
Why innovate?  Information Resources are changing
Correlation between e-resource use, book borrowing and student attainment.  But none between library visits and student at...
Why innovate?  For the fun of it! <ul><li>Click to edit Master text styles </li></ul><ul><li>Second level </li></ul><ul><u...
 
Active Learning Warm ups Go to your post Uses To check knowledge and get people moving around, active and alert. Good at t...
Mobile Technologies
Mobile Information Literacy <ul><li>How do you think information seeking and use changes with mobile devices? </li></ul><u...
Four areas where mobile IL varies – Where? <ul><li>“ Someone sends me a link at work ….  You just BANG, instapaper it … wh...
Four areas where mobile IL varies – What? <ul><li>“ I did install a trainline.com app … when I was coming back from a gig ...
Four areas where mobile IL varies – How? <ul><li>“ Where I’ve a preferred provider for any time of information … my first ...
Four areas where mobile IL varies – Time spent? <ul><li>“ I just love the thought of not being tethered to go and fire up ...
Four areas where mobile IL varies “ It’s interesting that having something like this (iPhone) will allow you to kind of de...
Aspects of mobile IL  (from my own research) Searching for information is Quick & Easy Information needs are contextual Se...
So what does this mean? <ul><li>Do we need to: </li></ul><ul><li>think about what search tools our users want via mobile? ...
 
 
Lemontree
Promotion
Future developments
 
 
Material from this talk at: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/12301   More stuff from me at: http://bit.ly/staffpageAW   I’m at  [e...
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Andrew walsh: Innovating for Information Literacy

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Presentation given at the Going it alone: innovations in information literacy conference. 13th Jan 2012

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  • This is our excuse for doing everything at the moment 
  • Librarians are often at the forefront of new technologies – it’s fun! It helps make work exciting…
  • Podcasting / vodcasting Text messaging – series of text messages, text walls, polls. App / mobile search QR codes – mainly now in handouts? Thinking about how other things we do show in VR apps – location aware stuff. So, played with lots of bits and pieces…. Do something live? iPod touch? Podcast? More active mobile phones in the UK than there are adults... 350+ million active users currently access Facebook through their mobile devices Twitter has 100 million active users (Sept 11)
  • Where it is manifested. Traditionally searching for information, evaluating it, and using that information may have been expected to happen in a limited range of contexts. Searching for information may happen in a library, from a fixed workspace, possibly at a fixed mutli-purpose computer with a large screen. Mobile search can happen anywhere from a range of devices with massive variation in functionality. Besides the original mobile search tool, the book, mobile search can happen from practically any mobile device that includes the ability to connect to the internet. People now search for information from mobile phones, PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), handheld games devices, eBook readers, Slates (touchscreen portable computers), netbooks, laptops, and more. This can happen anywhere with a mobile phone or wireless internet signal. Search no longer happens in fixed, controlled environments, but in random, messy, uncontrolled ones from crowded public transport on the way to work, to the loneliness of Mount Everest (Wood, 2009). Church and Smyth (2009) in a diary study of mobile information needs, found that over 67% of information needs in their participants were generated when the user was mobile. The quantity and penetration of mobile internet capable devices mean that these people can increasingly attempt to meet these needs when they occur. Indeed, Hemoinen (2009) found that amongst already active mobile internet users, virtually all of these “on the move” type of information needs were addressed through mobile devices as they occurred (145 out of 147 information needs), with the only failure to address a need occurring due to a mobile phone battery running out.
  • What searches are carried out . Mobile information needs are dominated by the desire for quick, often context specific information particularly regarding local services, travel and trivia (Church &amp; Smyth, 2009 and Heimonen 2009). Whereas with searching and using information in a fixed, traditional location we may search for anything and everything, this isn’t the case for mobile use. The searches we carry out on a mobile device are much more likely to be an additional activity rather than the sole focus of our attention, and therefore influenced by the primary activity we are also engaged in, that is the context in which we find ourselves (Hinze et al., 2010). The information we seek on the move is about facts and small elements of information. We look for the time of the next train, the way to the station, perhaps the closest place to eat while we are waiting, not for discussions on train reliability, the reasons why a train station is located there, or the place of take away cuisine in our cultural heritage. There is likely to be limited evaluation of the information we find, and little opportunity to take detailed information away and derive new knowledge from it. Detailed information is to be avoided as hard to read on the small screens we may be using, or to time consuming to look at in this context.
  •     How we search. Searching for information online from a desktop computer allows access to a wide range of established tools and information sources. It is normal to start searching for information with a generic search engine, which may then lead onto more specialist sites or search tools. It could be characterised by the breadth of sources and tools available and used. Mobile search, however, is heavily influenced by the natural constraints of using a device with a small screen, a small or virtual keyboard and may be characterised by narrowness of sources used. Nearly 40% of mobile users go direct to a known URL within less than 10% starting with a search engine (Fusco, 2010). Kamvar et al. (2009, p.804), also believe that mobile users search for more context or location specific information than fixed users, but “may look for this information within an application that can provide a richer experience than what a browser can provide” . Rather than search the open web, smartphone users are tending towards the installation and use of specialist apps, rather like using a small and somewhat random selection of dubious quality reference books rather than a well stocked library. Social networks / twitter instead of “search”?
  • Time spent on searching. Kamvar et al. (2009, p.805), found less time spent refining searches on mobile phones, including iPhones, with 1.94 queries per search session on a desktop, 1.82 from an iPhone and 1.70 from other mobiles. In Hemoinen’s (2009) study, it was found that 35% of information needs occurred in the home. Even though a fixed computer (or laptop) may have been available, the speed, proximity and convenience of using a mobile device trumped the more powerful device. People turn to their mobile devices for quick and dirty searches for information. They want to know something, and they want to know it now! I carried out focus groups a little while ago and when we talked about being able to search our electronic resources on the move the students were excited by the idea of searching for a book or journal article during a lecture, so they could decide if it was worth them reading the article later, or so they could beat their peers to the book in the physical library. Instant gratification!
  • So these are all areas where (small amounts of) existing research is flagging up differences and where people have interesting things to say about how the search for, use, evaluate information…. And when you interview people about these areas they do use terminology that directly translates to our general definitions!
  • From own interviews – explain key headings… I asked people who were confident smartphone users questions about how they search for information nowadays.
  • Add in question by pollanywhere?
  • So, wondered how to turn those people who visit the library but don’t use many of our resources, into more active users. How could we persuade them to use our electronic resources, or take out more books (for example), so engage in the activities we know are linked to academic acheivement. (timings need to be sorted…)
  • Note about mobile as I’m in the “mobile” strand – talk about the game running whether or not you’ve logged in – truly mobile, rather than an app ;-) irst picture as a mobile phone user, then into acheivements Overview of general game dynamics. Badges / achievements. Leaderboards. Hot/cold card. Levelling up. Pushing key achievements to Facebook (so social…). Friends (limited numbers) – extra points for checking in with friends…
  • Fill in a bit of stuff here about found objects? Plus social media....
  • Sketch out a few bits and pieces that it’d be nice to have? Particularly on promotion? integrating with the reading list software  differentiating between the types of points you&apos;ll be getting for accessing various online resources adding a few more achievements refining the interface so it works even better with lovely mobile browsers we&apos;ll be scattering special stickers and codes amongst the popular and less popular books, amongst the shelves, in hiding places with unique one time codes on them  
  • Andrew walsh: Innovating for Information Literacy

    1. 1. Innovating for Information Literacy Andrew Walsh University of Huddersfield Academic Librarian National Teaching Fellow @andywalsh999 Going it alone: innovations in information literacy. UEL, Jan 2012.
    2. 2. Who am I? A little about me… Chartered (MCLIP) 2007 Innovation Award (UC&R) 2009 LIRG Research Award 2009 National Teaching Fellowship 2011 Lots of articles, book chapters and two books on information literacy, mobile learning, active learning and more…
    3. 3. Why innovate?
    4. 4. <ul><li>“… it has been noted by many that library inductions (and orientation) and library instruction have elicited more than a few yawns from users…” </li></ul><ul><li>Walsh & Inala (2010) Active Learning Techniques for Librarians: Practical Examples. </li></ul>Why innovate? They think we’re boring
    5. 5. Why innovate? Staff and Students are changing
    6. 6. Why innovate? Information Resources are changing
    7. 7. Correlation between e-resource use, book borrowing and student attainment. But none between library visits and student attainment… Why innovate? Library usage makes a difference
    8. 8. Why innovate? For the fun of it! <ul><li>Click to edit Master text styles </li></ul><ul><li>Second level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Third level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fourth level </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fifth level </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>http://www.flickr.com/photos/7933170@N03/2631820657/ - by photographer padawan *(xava du).
    9. 10. Active Learning Warm ups Go to your post Uses To check knowledge and get people moving around, active and alert. Good at the start of a session or to wake people up further in. Materials required Pre-prepared signs – as large as possible. Notes Try to make sure you get a fair mix between the preferences or the discussion bit of this won’t work. Games Library Bingo Uses Any point where you may want to run through a list of items. Examples: inductions or sources of information. Materials required A small piece of coloured card (A5 or A6) for each member of the class. Notes Brightly coloured card works well. A small prize is nice for the winners. Games TV Games – Who wants to be a millionaire? Uses Get more active learning into the session. Encourage competition between members of the class. Materials required Quizdom (or similar) handsets. Notes Good to use at the middle or end of a session to see what has sunk in. Warn students early on that there will be a ‘test’ or quiz’
    10. 11. Mobile Technologies
    11. 12. Mobile Information Literacy <ul><li>How do you think information seeking and use changes with mobile devices? </li></ul><ul><li>How do people act differently when they can access the ‘net wherever they are? </li></ul>
    12. 13. Four areas where mobile IL varies – Where? <ul><li>“ Someone sends me a link at work …. You just BANG, instapaper it … when I’m on a bus journey or something I can just call up instapaper on my phone…” </li></ul>
    13. 14. Four areas where mobile IL varies – What? <ul><li>“ I did install a trainline.com app … when I was coming back from a gig in Manchester we got off one stop too far down the line so I was trying to find the train times to come back…” </li></ul>
    14. 15. Four areas where mobile IL varies – How? <ul><li>“ Where I’ve a preferred provider for any time of information … my first port of call would normally be their website … (or) … an app if it was a website I would always go for that sort of information…” </li></ul>
    15. 16. Four areas where mobile IL varies – Time spent? <ul><li>“ I just love the thought of not being tethered to go and fire up the old laptop or desktop machine…” </li></ul>“ old laptop” from http://www.flickr.com/photos/running_like_an_antelope/2307016308/
    16. 17. Four areas where mobile IL varies “ It’s interesting that having something like this (iPhone) will allow you to kind of delegate remembering facts and free you up for kind of critical thinking…” “ Fixed” IL “ Mobile” IL Where? Largely in “set” places. At a desktop computer (with little variation in software); at a fixed workplace; within a library. Anywhere; any mobile device (phone, games device, eBook reader – massive variation in device). What? Anything? Normally quick information, often context or location specific?. How? Range of established tools to access and manage wide range of information sources. Standard search engines. Often narrow Apps and individual specialist sites rather than open web. Time spent? Varies. Often slow, long access. People spending long periods searching for, organising and extracting information, especially for academic use. Quick / Fast only. Shorter searches. Little pondering and extracting information. Favour short chunks of info. “Convenience” of device.
    17. 18. Aspects of mobile IL (from my own research) Searching for information is Quick & Easy Information needs are contextual Searching can be social Our memory can be outsourced Mobile internet acting as a bridge between devices Information is constantly pushed to us
    18. 19. So what does this mean? <ul><li>Do we need to: </li></ul><ul><li>think about what search tools our users want via mobile? </li></ul><ul><li>learn new tools to move information between devices? </li></ul><ul><li>Learn how to extract information online and organise it via mobiles? </li></ul>
    19. 22. Lemontree
    20. 23. Promotion
    21. 24. Future developments
    22. 27. Material from this talk at: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/12301 More stuff from me at: http://bit.ly/staffpageAW I’m at [email_address] or @andywalsh999 on Twitter Thanks for listening…

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