0
By:
V. Dian Ratna P.
Sanata Dharma University
Menu.
..
Start
• Introduction
• Literature Review
• Methodology
Main
• Analysis and Discussion
Final
• Conclusion
• Refere...
Introduction
 Different address terms depends on the social class, age,
sex, etc.
 A teacher can be called Sir or Mr. Sm...
Research Questions
1. What are the address terms used in The King’s
Speech movie?
2. How are the address terms used in The...
Literature Review
 Address terms: Title, First Name (FN), Last Name
(LN), Nickname, Combination or nothing at all
 The c...
Cont.
 Process (based on social factors):
* symmetrical: John to Fred
(inequality and unfamiliarity)
* asymmetrical: Mr. ...
Method
 Content or document analysis:
film analysis  The King’s Speech by Tom
Hooper
 Steps:
1. Determining the objecti...
Analysis and Discussion
 Formal address terms for the King:
* Your Royal Highness (people to the King)
* his Majesty (Kin...
Cont.
 Doctor
e.g. “Thank you so much, Doctor, it’s been most
interesting” (Elizabeth to the 1st doctor)
least intimate:...
Cont.: Surprise ^_^
 Lionel calls the King: Bertie to be less formal
 Wardhaugh (2010: 288), it shows:
“those at the bot...
Cont.: Process
Asymmetrical
Doctor to Mr.
Johnson (vice versa)
Symmetrical
Bertie to Lionel
(to reduce
differences)
Cont.
 Symmetrical: within family (intimate relationship)
e.g. Elizabeth or David and Bertie
“David : Hello, Bertie.
Bert...
Conclusion
 Status differences are highly regarded in The King’s
Speech
 Title alone and TLN are used when two people ha...
References
 Fraenkel, J.R and Wallen, N.E.. (2008). How to Resign
and Evaluate Research in Education (7th ed.). Boston:
M...
That’s all ...
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Addressing Terms in The King’s Speech Movie

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Transcript of "Addressing Terms in The King’s Speech Movie"

  1. 1. By: V. Dian Ratna P. Sanata Dharma University
  2. 2. Menu. .. Start • Introduction • Literature Review • Methodology Main • Analysis and Discussion Final • Conclusion • References
  3. 3. Introduction  Different address terms depends on the social class, age, sex, etc.  A teacher can be called Sir or Mr. Smith by his students at school. However, he might also be called Dear by his wife or John by his brother at home.  The King’s Speech movie by Tom Hooper
  4. 4. Research Questions 1. What are the address terms used in The King’s Speech movie? 2. How are the address terms used in The King’s Speech movie?
  5. 5. Literature Review  Address terms: Title, First Name (FN), Last Name (LN), Nickname, Combination or nothing at all  The choice of name used for addressing others depends both on the knowledge of exactly who that other is and the circumstances of the conversation. (Wardhaugh, 2010: 282)
  6. 6. Cont.  Process (based on social factors): * symmetrical: John to Fred (inequality and unfamiliarity) * asymmetrical: Mr. Jones to Elizabeth (equality and familiarity)  Sir or Madam are generalized variants of the Title category  Jack, Buddy or Mate are generic first name (FN)  Title alone: least intimate  Nickname or pet name: greater intimacy  Positive and negative politeness (Holmes, 2001: 268)
  7. 7. Method  Content or document analysis: film analysis  The King’s Speech by Tom Hooper  Steps: 1. Determining the objectives 2. Specifying the unit of analysis 3. Watching the movie 4. Locating the relevant data (taking samples) 5. Analyzing the data
  8. 8. Analysis and Discussion  Formal address terms for the King: * Your Royal Highness (people to the King) * his Majesty (King George VI to his father) * Your Highness (Sir Blandine-Bentham to the King)  Formal addresses (Title) are used to respect the King.
  9. 9. Cont.  Doctor e.g. “Thank you so much, Doctor, it’s been most interesting” (Elizabeth to the 1st doctor) least intimate: not mentioning the doctor’s first name  TLN: * Lionel Logue calls the King with “Mr. Johnson” * the King calls Lionel with “Doctor” or “Dr. Logue”  Negative politeness is shown to respect the status differences
  10. 10. Cont.: Surprise ^_^  Lionel calls the King: Bertie to be less formal  Wardhaugh (2010: 288), it shows: “those at the bottom seek to minimize their difference in status from those at the top and those at the top seek to maximize that difference.”  Expression of positive politeness  “Bertie” is used to show equality/familiarity
  11. 11. Cont.: Process Asymmetrical Doctor to Mr. Johnson (vice versa) Symmetrical Bertie to Lionel (to reduce differences)
  12. 12. Cont.  Symmetrical: within family (intimate relationship) e.g. Elizabeth or David and Bertie “David : Hello, Bertie. Bertie : Hello, David. David : Been waiting long? Bertie : Where’ve you been? David : Been busy. Bertie : So was I. … Bertie : Oh for heaven’s sake, David. You know how long he’s been ill. … (when Bertie waits nervously for David) Bertie : David! Thank God. You look exhausted! How are you bearing up? David : Bertie. I have to go. The decision’s been made.”  Kinship system: children to Bertie (Papa) e.g. “Bertie : So how was Papa? Lillibet : Halting at first, but you got much better Papa. Margaret : You were just splendid, Papa.”
  13. 13. Conclusion  Status differences are highly regarded in The King’s Speech  Title alone and TLN are used when two people have not known each other well  Name given from a family (such as Bertie) or first name only creates equality.  Asymmetrical process: the King and his people  Symmetrical process: only happens within a family, particularly happens between Lionel and Bertie
  14. 14. References  Fraenkel, J.R and Wallen, N.E.. (2008). How to Resign and Evaluate Research in Education (7th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.  Holmes, J. (2001). An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (2nd ed.). Essex: Pearson Education.  Wardhaugh, R. (1992). An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell.  ___________. (2010). An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (6th ed.). Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.
  15. 15. That’s all ...
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