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UCSF OCPD: How to Give and Receive Feedback Effectively
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These slides are for the OCPD workshop "How to Give and Receive Effective Feedback" for UCSF students and postdoctoral scholars.

These slides are for the OCPD workshop "How to Give and Receive Effective Feedback" for UCSF students and postdoctoral scholars.

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  • Sometimes called:Corrective FeedbackConstructive FeedbackConstructive CriticismIn general…There is a moment – if we could stop time, between the time a person asks you for something – hey, can you swtich with me, cover my shift, do this for me, give me five doallrs, etc.,… and the moment you respond. In this moment – in this gap – there is a stoplight. And ther are three steps in every situation – every one – that will help you navitiate it. This stop light is this. Step one – before you say no, you have to undersand why you want to say yes. Setp to assess the request. Before the only reason you’re saying no is so you can say ‘ no problem, I’ll right on that.’ as a third year. The only reason you’re saying so, is because you need need it to start the phrase, no problem, I’ll get right on that. I didn’t need any sleep anyway. If you can do this – it’s the foundation of yoursaying no. But first, we need to quickly look at why we say yes.
  • Hopefully this will make you empathietcHurt feelingsPeople get defensice an issue because a person who receives feedback as a trainee, you are adversely affected when the person supervising. Training of trying to syupport you
  • People never learned how to give feedback skillfully. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly?B“I’m concerned you’re un-teachable”Because they make it generalYou need to focus more on patient safetyBecause they fail to acknowledge the person’s good intentions, regardless of their poor outcome. You just did that poorly
  • People never learned how to give feedback skillfully. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly?B“I’m concerned you’re un-teachable”Because they make it generalYou need to focus more on patient safetyBecause they fail to acknowledge the person’s good intentions, regardless of their poor outcome. You just did that poorly
  • People never learned how to give feedback skillfully. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly?B“I’m concerned you’re un-teachable”Because they make it generalYou need to focus more on patient safetyBecause they fail to acknowledge the person’s good intentions, regardless of their poor outcome. You just did that poorly
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • Interactive – practice saying no. No doesn’t mean no forever.You don’t have to give a reason. People will think that you are in a negotiation, And if they solve you’re problem, you will solve thiers. You don’t have to solve their problem. Don’t let others wear you down.gHow many of you felt a twinge!Be okay with the awkward feeling.You have to be okay with people’s reaction to your no, because you cannot control it. Be okay with other people’s disappointment. It’s very hard to watch people struggle with something, or to see them suffer. But you aren’t necessaryilythr best or only solution. You’re just another exerpeice on their joiurney to figuring out their own problem.
  • out

Transcript

  • 1. What I meant to say…. How to give and receive feedback effectivelyNaledi SaulAssociate DirectorOffice of Career & Professional DevelopmentUniversity of California, San Francisco© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop, you will know….. 1. What professional, constructive feedback is. 2. The steps to give and receive constructive feedback. 3. How to assess how skillful someone is in giving or receiving feedback 4. How to respond to people who are unskillful at giving or receiving feedback. 2© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 3. Agenda: Today we are covering: 1. What is effective, constructive feedback, anyway? 1. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly? 1. Dissecting the language to:  Give feedback  Receive feedback  Respond skillfully when you receive unskillful feedback 3© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 4. What is “Feedback”, anyway?  The act of offering another person kudos or corrective information about their performance. o Kudos = You did that well! Keep it up! o Corrective = Don’t do that again. Do this instead.  Optimally, it is based on facts, and is specific, accurate and useful to the recipient.  “Useful” is defined as information presented in a way that both helps and motivates a person to improve their performance. 4© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 5. Agenda: Today we are covering: 1. What is effective, constructive feedback, anyway? 1. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly? 1. Dissecting the language to:  Give feedback  Receive feedback  Respond skillfully when you receive unskillful feedback 5© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Why people give feedback poorly Because they: 1. Are afraid the person will receive the feedback poorly o Will be defensive, or angry o Will have their feelings hurt 1. Never learned how to give effective feedback 2. Don’t realize it is ineffective (perhaps because it how their were given feedback) 3. Don’t care that the feedback they give is ineffective. 6© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 7. What are features of effective feedback? Constructive feedback is skillful and sincere. 7© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 8. What are features of effective feedback? “Skillful” means it is always:  Specific  Focused on behavior or actions  Clear: it is focused on 1-3 key points, which are actionable  Balanced, taking into consideration overall performance  Continuous Optimally, it is:  Immediate 8© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 9. What are features of effective feedback? “Sincere” means:  The goal of the communication is to improve performance.  It acknowledges the person’s good intentions, regardless of their poor outcome (if their intentions are good).  There are no negative verbal or non-verbal cues: No yelling, sarcasm in your tone, eye rolling, public shaming, etc. 9© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 10. If you remember nothing else How to respond based on their skillfulness & sincerity When the feedback is…. Sincere Insincere Thank the person Thank the person Skillful + end the conversation Thank the person Thank the person Unskillful + + ask clarifying end the questions conversation 10© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Agenda: Today we are covering: 1. What is effective, constructive feedback, anyway? 1. Why do people give or receive feedback poorly? 1. Dissecting the language to:  Give feedback  Receive feedback  Respond skillfully when you receive unskillful feedback 11© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Dissecting the language around…. 1. Giving feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 2. Receiving feedback  Receiving kudos  Receiving kudos & corrective information  Receiving corrective information 3. Responding when the feedback is unskillful or insincere 12© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Dissecting the language around…. 1. Giving feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 2. Offering feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 3. Responding when the feedback is unskillful or insincere 13© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 14. Giving skillful feedback Offering kudos Identify how their Acknowledge their actions reached Encourage them to positive intention their intended continue outcome. Starting and ending your presentation with a I can tell that your patient’s story was very intention was to get your effective. It humanized the audience understand how data. Nicely done. outreach and education programs save lives. It was also helpful to hear actual examples to illustrate each point. 14© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 15. Giving skillful feedback Offering kudos & corrective information Summarize your positive Summarize the key points Make a feedback of your corrective feedback recommendation/suggest preferred action I think the outline I think you are I suggest you only and key points of putting too much include 3 key points your presentation information on your per slide, and then are compelling. slides. just tell the audience Also, your graphs the detail current on Your audience can’t are clear and you slides. read that much text. effective 15© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Giving skillful feedback Offering corrective information Identify how their Make a Acknowledge their actions did not recommendation or positive intention reach their suggest preferred intended outcome. action But you often had your back to the Perhaps you could I know your goal is to audience, facing your write yourself connect with your slides. reminders to look up audience. When you don’t at your audience in make eye contact, you your notes. lose the connection. 16© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 17. Dissecting the language around…. 1. Giving feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 2. Offering feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 3. Responding when the feedback is unskillful or insincere 17© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 18. Receiving Feedback Receiving kudos Explain why you Thank them for Thank them find their their feedback again feedback useful I’ve been studying preventative health issues all week, and the cut-off values for the I appreciate the Thank you for taking the glucose fasting levels in feedback. time to tell me. diabetes just last night. It’s good to hear that I’m apply the information correctly. 18© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 19. Receiving Feedback Receiving corrective information (when you agree) Thank them Summarize Confirm Thank them for their what they said request again feedback It’s a little embarrassing to I’ve been biking to work. I realize this can be an From now on, I will take hear that some staff haveawkward conversation, and steps Thanks. commented to you aboutI appreciate you telling me. (shower, deodorant, etc.) my body odor. before work when I do. 19© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 20. Receiving Feedback Receiving corrective information (but need more detail) Thank them for Summarize Ask clarifying Confirm their feedback what they said questions request I asked, ‘how was So, in sum, use your morning?” To specifics like, ‘Did Was that what you summarize, you’re you use your cane?’ Thank you for meant when you suggesting that I and, ‘Did you take agiving me feedback said my questions ask more specific shower this about how to were too broad? questions when morning’, becausecommunicate with specific questions speaking with patients. reduce a patient’s patients with Would, ‘Did you Alzheimer’s. use your cane this agitation. morning’ be a more Thank you. effective question? 20© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 21. Receiving Feedback Receiving corrective information (but need more detail) Thank them for Summarize Ask clarifying Confirm their feedback what they said questions request Okay, next You’ve In this specific time, also I appreciate mentioned case, I did X, Y consider the hearing before that I and Z, when impact of A feedback need to do a the patient and B when about my better job of slipped. But it considering performance. ‘Thinking on seems there responding to my feet”. was something the situation. I missed. Thank you. 21© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 22. Some thoughts on corrective feedback  It can be hard not to defensive about corrective feedback o Particularly when you are trying your best. o Or the person giving the feedback is less skillful that you’d like.  Be compassionate with yourself o If you’re a novice – you’re expected to make mistakes. o If you’re an expert, you’re probably excellent, but no one is perfect.  Be compassionate with others o Try to remember the good intention (sincerity) of the person giving the feedback, even if they aren’t skillful.  Trust, but verify o If one person gives you feedback, check with others you trust to assess it’s accuracy. o If multiple people do, and you don’t see it, it’s your blind spot. 22© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 23. Dissecting the language around…. 1. Giving feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 2. Offering feedback  Offering kudos  Offering kudos & corrective information  Offering corrective information 3. Responding when the feedback is unskillful or insincere 23© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 24. Responding when feedback is unskillful or insincere Moderate your response to the situation:  The feedback is harsh or personal  The feedback is unclear, or un-measurable  The feedback is a deluge of information  The feedback is unreasonable  You feel the feedback is inaccurate  It isn’t feedback at all 24© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 25. What to do When it’s harsh or unclear: Ask for specifics Thank them Summarize Ask clarifying Confirm for their what they said questions request feedback What specific No one wants steps could I You’d like to to I appreciate to be un- take to specifically your feedback teachable address that work on X issue 25© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 26. What to do When it’s a deluge: get them to prioritize Thank them Summarize what Ask clarifying Confirm for their they said questions request feedback Clearly there that there are several areas of improvement for me. I should focus on You’ve identified improving my several issues around Which 1-2 do you patient listening I appreciate your around suggest I skills by feedback. communicating with prioritize? repeating/confirm patients, ability to ing the patient’s give a physical exam responses. and my patient presentation skills. 26© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 27. What to do When it’s unreasonable: get them to decide Thank them Summarize Ask clarifying Confirm for their what they said questions request feedback It’s clear from your comments that My presentation my outline should (or note) is have been disorganized. different. Okay – I should do I understand. Should I have X, Y and Z. And I should know organized the how to do this information by already. system, or by problem list? Something else? 27© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 28. What to do When it’s inaccurate: Offer data Thank them Summarize Ask clarifying Confirm for their what they said questions request feedback I should share that have been absent I know that it is for two days, due I see. I should important to be to illness. But it I appreciate your inform both X and present and seems there was feedback Y when I need to committed to this some additional take sick leave. internship steps I should take to inform the team. 28© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 29. Receiving Feedback A special note on insincere feedback  When you have evidence that the person is insincere in their feedback….  for example, your sense is that their goal is to humiliate, not educate),  do not prolong the interaction. Particularly when there is a power differential – be careful about asking clarifying questions. Instead, acknowledge their feedback, and move forward. 29© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 30. Receiving Skillful Feedback Receiving insincere feedback Thank them Summarize Thank them for their what they said and move on feedback Apparently I’ve I need to consider Thank you for the my actions in light been ‘too eager’ in feedback. what you said. team meetings Thank you. Don’t get defensive – just summarize what 30© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. Allyou did, and ask for additional information. rights reserved.
  • 31. The #1 question about feedback:  I’ve heard that it’s helpful to give “positive, negative, positive” feedback when I want someone to change their behavior. Is that a good idea?  No, because at times it can dilute the message – people hear the “positive” but ignore the “negative”. “Positive” “Negative” “Positive” feedback feedback feedback Jane, you’re doing a Can you? Because But you’re not really great job other than that, responding to my organizing the you’re doing a great emails. health fair job. 31© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 32. The #1 question about feedback  Instead, be clear and respectful by asking for what you want, and getting buy in. Acknowledge their State the preferred Get buy inintention or situation action But I need you to Jane, I know it’s respond to my Is that something finals week. emails within 24 you are able to do? hours. 32© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 33. Final points Focus on being sincere, even if you aren’t skillful, in giving or receiving feedback. 3 good questions to ask yourself before engaging others. o Is it true? o Is it helpful? o Is it necessary? Want more help about giving or receiving effective feedback? Make a 1:1 counseling appointment. It’s easy - just call 476.4986. 33© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
  • 34. What I meant to say…. How to give and receive feedback effectivelyNaledi SaulAssociate DirectorOffice of Career & Professional DevelopmentUniversity of California, San Francisco© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.