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Orlando jail reentry jannetta v2 (2) Orlando jail reentry jannetta v2 (2) Presentation Transcript

  • The TJC Model for Building a Jail-to-Community Transition System Partnering for Jail Re-Entry Services Seminar Orlando, Florida June 13, 2013 The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative THE URBAN INSTITUTE Justice Policy Center
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Presentation Plan • TJC Initiative Overview • Principles of Effective Intervention • TJC Model Elements and Implementation – Client Level – System Level • Resources Available to You • Questions
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Why TJC Is Needed • Jails see huge numbers of individuals – 13 million annual admissions – High levels of need (substance abuse, mental illness, homelessness) • Reentry knowledge base is very prison-focused • Jails face unique challenges managing reentry – High turnover – Disparate population – High demand on limited resources
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative TJC Overview Initiated by NIC cooperative agreement with Urban Institute in 2007 to: • Develop a TJC model to assist with implementing effective transition strategies • Select and provide implementation assistance to TJC learning sites • Phase 1 Sites: 2008-2012 • Phase 2 Sites: 2012-2015 • Conduct process and systems-change evaluation of TJC • Disseminate TJC knowledge to inform practice nationwide • Web-based TJC Online Learning Toolkit launched April 2010
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative TJC Learning Sites Phase 1 Sites Largest City County Pop. Jail ADP Phase 2 Sites Largest City County Pop. Jail ADP Davidson County, TN Nashville 626,144 2,604 Ada County, ID Boise 400,842 829 Denver County, CO Denver 598,707 2,009 Franklin County, MA Greenfield 71,778 129 Douglas County, KS Lawrence 114,748 155 Fresno County, CA Fresno 942,904 1,923 Kent County, MI Grand Rapids 605,213 1,254 Hennepin County, MN Minneapolis 1,168,431 1,112 La Crosse County, WI La Crosse 112,627 187 Howard County, MD Columbia 293,142 319 Orange County, CA Santa Ana 3,010,759 6,545 Duval County, FL Jacksonville 870,709 2,929 AB 109 Site Largest City County Pop. Jail ADP AB 109 Site Largest City County Pop. Jail ADP San Diego County, CA San Diego 3,140,069 4,630 Santa Barbara County, CA Santa Maria 426,878 899
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative System Elements Individual Intervention Elements - - Targeted intervention strategies Data-driven understanding of local reentry Collaborative structure and joint ownership Leadership, vision, and organizational culture Self-evaluation and sustainability + ++ + Screening & Assessment Targeted Interventions COMMUNITYJAIL Transition Plan Formal servicesInformation & referrals Informal support systemsCase management Supervision TJC Model
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Principles of Effective Correctional Intervention 1. Assess Actuarial Risk/Needs 2. Enhance Intrinsic Motivation 3. Target Interventions a) Risk Principle: Prioritize supervision and treatment resources for higher risk offenders b) Need Principle: Target interventions to criminogenic (correlated to crime) needs. c) Responsivity Principle: Be responsive to temperament, learning style, motivation, culture, and gender when assigning programs d) Dosage: Structure 40-70% of high-risk offenders’ time for three to nine months. e) Treatment Principle: Integrate treatment into the full sentence/ sanction requirements. 4. Skill Train With Directed Practice (e.g., use cognitive behavioral treatment methods) 5. Increase Positive Reinforcement 6. Engage Ongoing Support in Natural Communities 7. Measure Relevant Processes/Practices 8. Provide Measurement Feedback Source: Crime and Justice Institute and National Institute of Corrections
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Common Language on Concepts • Risk – Likelihood of recidivism in the community – Can be gauged primarily using static factors (those that do not change) – Tells a system who to target for intervention • Criminogenic Need – Dynamic factors (changeable) related to likelihood of reoffending – Tells a system what issues to address in a target population
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Program Effectiveness for High-Risk Offenders Lowenkamp & Latessa, 2004 (N=13,221)
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Lowenkamp & Latessa, 2004 (N=13,221) Program Effectiveness for Low-Risk Offenders
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative What Are Criminogenic Needs? Criminogenic Need Factor Risk History of antisocial behavior Early and continuing involvement in a number and variety of antisocial acts and a variety of settings Antisocial personality pattern Adventurous pleasure seeking, weak self-control, restlessly aggressive Antisocial cognition Attitudes, values, beliefs, and rationalizations supportive of crime; cognitive emotional states of anger, resentment, and defiance Antisocial associates Close association with criminal others and relative isolation from anticriminal others; immediate social support for crime Family and/or marital Two key elements are nurturance and/or caring and monitoring and/or supervision School and/or work Low levels of performance and satisfaction in school and/or work Leisure and/or recreation Low levels of involvement and satisfaction in anticriminal leisure pursuits Substance abuse Abuse of alcohol and/or other drugs Adapted from Andrews, Bonta and Wormith (2006), The Recent Past and Near Future of Risk and/or Need Assessment.
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative First Four Are the “Big Four” Criminogenic Need Factor Risk History of antisocial behavior Early and continuing involvement in a number and variety of antisocial acts and a variety of settings Antisocial personality pattern Adventurous pleasure seeking, weak self-control, restlessly aggressive Antisocial cognition Attitudes, values, beliefs, and rationalizations supportive of crime; cognitive emotional states of anger, resentment, and defiance Antisocial associates Close association with criminal others and relative isolation from anticriminal others; immediate social support for crime Family and/or marital Two key elements are nurturance and/or caring and monitoring and/or supervision School and/or work Low levels of performance and satisfaction in school and/or work Leisure and/or recreation Low levels of involvement and satisfaction in anticriminal leisure pursuits Substance abuse Abuse of alcohol and/or other drugs Adapted from Andrews, Bonta and Wormith (2006), The Recent Past and Near Future of Risk and/or Need Assessment.
  • Low Risk Screening High Risk Med. Risk Resource information upon release Assessment High Risk Med. Risk TransitionPlanning Post-ReleaseInterventions Jail-Based Interventions Longer LOS Shorter LOS Intervention Filter
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Tools for Gauging Risk and Need • Screening (e.g. Proxy, LSI-SV) – Quick and minimal resource – Risk only – Flags those needing more attention • General Assessment (e.g. LSI-R, COMPAS, Wisconsin) – More comprehensive (and resource intensive: 45-60 minutes to administer) – Identify risk and criminogenic needs – Basis for transition plans • Specialized Assessment (e.g. STATIC-99, URICA, ASUS) – Covers specific areas (ex. addiction, motivation to change) in greater detail; or – Covers specific populations (ex. sex offenders) whose risk/need profile differs from general population
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative R-N-R Principles Work as a Package Source: Andrews and Bonta (2007), Risk-Need-Responsivity Model for Offender Assessment and Rehabilitation
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Characteristics of Systems Approaches • Span agency boundaries • Provide overarching framework – Organize complexity • Involve collaborative planning and oversight • Process is emphasized • Outcome-oriented • Data-driven
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Impediments to Systems Approaches • Difficult to reconcile missions, incentives, cultures of participating agencies • Systems change approaches often move slowly – And sometimes should move more slowly still • Skepticism regarding risk and need-based decision- making • Data limitations – Doesn’t exist – Limited analytical capacity – Inability to look across data systems
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative System Elements • Convening authority • Oversight and guidance • Pushing a systems culture Leadership, vision, and organizational culture
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Phase 1 Site Leadership Engagement Site Roles of Formal Leadership Davidson County • Spearheaded by sheriff • Overseen by Community Justice Executive Council chaired by mayor Denver • Overseen by Crime Prevention and Control Commission established by mayor Douglas County • Created Executive Council including sheriff and county commissioner Kent County • Community Corrections Advisory Board oversees La Crosse County • County supervisor on core implementation team • TJC on Criminal Justice Management Committee agenda Orange County (CA) • Collaboration between sheriff and probation
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative System Elements • Engage all partners in the issue • Inspire and motivate them to contribute • Organize their participation • Clarify roles and responsibilities Collaborative structure and joint ownership Leadership, vision, and organizational culture +
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Community Corrections Advisory Board (Executive-level Team)* Screening & Assessment Work Group • Brad VanZanten – Chair, 11/2009 • Randy Demory, KCSD – co-Chair • Kristen Geitzen, Arbor Circle • Jon McKay, jail MH supervisor /FOC • Shannon Myers, MI DOC (parole) • Andy Verheek, OCC • Peggy Vickery, KCSD reentry center • Gary Christensen, Corrections Partners (NTJC) Community Reentry Coordinating Council** (Implementation Body for TJC) National TJC Team – NIC, UI Kent County TJC Initiative Structure Data & Evaluation Work Group • Andy Verheek, OCC – Chair ?? • Dave Anderson, KCSD (CRC) • Randy Demory, KCSD • Jack Greenfield, Arbor Circle • Others? – TBD 12/2009 or 1/2010 • Janeen Buck Willison, UI (NTJC) * Circa 1989; the CCAB distributes and administers community corrections grant funding, forum for all local criminal justice planning. Members represent the judiciary, county commission, prosecution, defense bar, local law enforcement, Sheriff, business community and community-based organizations. ** Established June 2008; meets monthly. The CRCC focuses exclusively on reentry and its related issues, and membership mirrors the CCAB but different individuals staff the CRCC. Program & Curricula Work Group • Tina Worrall, CRC – Chair • Barb DeVos, OCC – co-Chair • Ross Buitendorp, Network 180 • Bill Bruursema, FMM • Kristen Geitzen, Arbor Circle • Candice Petrovich, FOC • Rob Steele, KCSD • Brad VanZanten. 59th District (probation) • Kevin Warwick, ASA (NTJC) 12/15/09 revised (v3) Kent TJC Core Team • Randy Demory, KCSD • Tina Worrall, TJC Coordinator • Andy Verheek, OCC • Barb DeVos, OCC • Jack Greenfield, Arbor Circle • Dave Anderson, KCSD (CRC)
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative System Elements • Discovery: Finding out the key things about your jail population that you don’t know • Clarification: Articulating who is in the jail and what is known about them to orient all partners Data-driven understanding of local reentry Collaborative structure and joint ownership Leadership, vision, and organizational culture ++
  • Bookings N=219 Average Daily Population (ADP) N=326 Pretrial N=108 (49% of bookings) 30% released within 48 hrs. 8% released within 48-72 hrs. Pretrial Length of Stay 0-90 days: 74% 90+ days: 26% Pretrial Release Type 49% Bond 20% Court Ordered Release 15% Detainer 6% DOC 3% Sentence Served 3% Waived Extradition 3% Released on Recognizance Sentenced N=39 (18% of bookings) Length of Stay Federal detainees (ICE & USM) N= 42 (19% of bookings) Weekend Sentenced N=30 (14% of bookings) 36% Released on Bond 24% Released as Sentence Served 16% Court-Ordered Release 12% Released on Detainer 5% Released to State DOC 2% Waived Extradition 2% Released on Personal Recognizance (ROR) 2% Released to ICE 1% Other (includes Parole and Released as Sentence Suspended) Release Type (Pretrial and Sentenced) (not including federal detainees & weekenders) HCDC 2011 Monthly Snapshot
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative System Elements • Formalize • Written policies and procedures • Stakeholder education material • Monitor quality • Measure process and outcomes Targeted intervention strategies Data-driven understanding of local reentry Collaborative structure and joint ownership Leadership, vision, and organizational culture Self-evaluation and sustainability + ++ +
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Institutional Phase Structured Reentry Phase Transition to Community / Reintegration Phase Initial Screening (Proxy) Treatment in Jail Great Escape (in-custody) G.E.D Substance Abuse Probation Outreach-Resource-Follow-up Resource Center Great Escape (post- custody placement) Probation Thinking for a Change B.O.T. (post-custody placement) Community Outreach (OCREP) In Jail Meeting with Community Meeting with Programs Re-Entry Team Housing Family Job Victim Community Outreach Orange County, CA Re-Entry Model Thinking for a Change B.O.T. workshops DRC Day Reporting Center Wisconsin Risk/Needs Assessment (high risk)
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative TJC Can Start from Different Points • Nascent: Little or no jail reentry activity exists – Priority: Identify a starting point • Fragmented: Jail and community reentry activity in place, but little coordination or communication – Priority: Establish collaboration and fill gaps • Unbalanced: Reentry work in either jail or community much more advanced than the other – Priority: Build up other side and ensure coordinated approach • Mature: Reentry system in place – Priority: Focus on maintenance and continuous improvement • Uncertain: Not sure what’s in place – Priority: Fact-finding and information-gathering
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Hub and Spoke Model: Denver Jail Life Skills Release Community Reentry Project
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Network Model: Davidson County Davidson County Sheriff’s Office
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative Boundary-Spanning Partner Model: La Crosse Justice Sanctions Jail-Based Programming • Assessment • Case Planning Release • Direct Service • Supervision
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative TJC and Related Resources • TJC Project website: www.jailtransition.com – Phase 1 Process and Systems Change Evaluation Report – Practitioner briefs • Screening and Assessment • Case Management • TJC Online Learning Toolkit: www.jailtransition.com/toolkit • The Elected Official’s Toolkit for Jail Reentry • Partnering with Jails to Improve Reentry: A Guidebook for Community-Based Organizations
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative TJC Online Learning Toolkit • Web-based learning resource on TJC model implementation • Makes core TJC tools and examples available to practitioners • Can be updated to reflect emerging lessons and practices
  • Toolkit Screen Shot
  • The Transition from Jail to Community Initiative For More Information Jesse Jannetta, TJC Project Director jjannetta@urban.org 202-261-5593