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PDA in theory and practice
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PDA in theory and practice PDA in theory and practice Presentation Transcript

  • September 22, 2011
    • Library / Peter van Laarhoven
    PDA in theory and practice
    Some comments
    on Rick Anderson
  • September 22, 2011
    Summary in advance
    (low) circulation is not a strong argument for PDA
    (high) selection cost/time ís
    PDA can be suitable for (a significant) part of our patrons’ book needs
    PDA is not likely to be cheaper
    the DRM entailed by current PDA practice is in the way of optimal use & usability
    putting your stakes on PDA-with-DRM ignores the growing tensions in academic book publishing.
  • September 22, 2011
    Personal note
    I limit myself to books
    Premiss: “the (current) collection is a bad guess at patron needs”
    circulation is low (waste of money)
    circulation is falling (‘down dramatically’)
    U of Groningen
    circulation is not low
    10% – 15% not checked out after 10 years (+do not forget on-site use)
    5 -10 average # of loans of 10 year old books
    circulation is
    not falling in total
    moderately falling per student (growth of the university).
  • September 22, 2011
    Book selection by librarians, I agree,
    ís costly, but mainly in terms of librarian time spent
    and therefore relatively inefficient,
    but not for all (types of) books
    Types of academic books (≈ submarkets, business models)
    reference works
    textbooks
    general intellectual record (<> public libraries)
    books for student/faculty research
    PDA: suitable for the latter (big) category
    low ratio of budget : book supply
    selection is guesswork indeed
  • September 22, 2011
    Expectation (wish): PDA will
    better reflect patron needs -> OK
    be cheaper(in times of decreasing book budgets)
    Experience
    budgets depleted in months/weeks (-> LIS literature)
    U of Groningen ‘simulation’
    ebrary H&PS: 6,600 e-books with imprint 2006- (plus 7,000 older books)
    corresponding book budget ± € 35,000
    books opened after 12 months: 1,321
    autopurchase at 20 ‘pageviews’
    586 books for € 34,494 after 12 months
    autopurchase at 10 ‘pageviews’
    596 books for € 34,272 after 9 months
    808 books for € 46,959 after 12 months
  • September 22, 2011
    PDA == e-books with DRM(digital rights management)
    + allows title-by-title purchase
    + avoids e-book packages of (commercial) publishers
    - usability crippled by design
    - offline reading practically impossible
    - long-term availability/archivability uncertain
    - do patrons see DRM e-books as equivalent to print?
    Growing tensions in academic book publishing
    potential of e-publishing underused
    academics writing for academics (cf. serials crisis)
    balance between stakeholder interests needed
    moving wall open access for ‘no longer current’ books
    PDA without DRM (Elsevier’s EBS).
  • September 22, 2011
    Summary
    (low) circulation is not a strong argument for PDA
    (high) selection cost/time ís
    PDA can be suitable for (a significant) part of our patrons’ book needs
    PDA is not likely to be cheaper
    the DRM entailed by current PDA practice is in the way of optimal use & usability
    putting your stakes on PDA-with-DRM ignores the growing tensions in academic book publishing.
  • mm-dd-yy
    | 8
    Thank you
    p.j.b.m.van.laarhoven@rug.nl