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UAlbany Weekend MBA Stories - Whitney Selover

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Many people have asked about the composition of the University at Albany Weekend MBA Program students, alumni, and faculty. These people are curious about what they do, their background, and their …

Many people have asked about the composition of the University at Albany Weekend MBA Program students, alumni, and faculty. These people are curious about what they do, their background, and their areas of research. To begin to answer those questions, we will spotlight a Weekender regularly to allow them to share their story. Enjoy the profiles and please contact Program Director Don Purdy at dpurdy@albany.edu, at 518.442.4964, or at @UAlbanyMBA if you have any questions, need additional information, or would like to sit in on a class!

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  • 1. UAlbany Weekend MBA Stories – Whitney SeloverDirector of Special Events and Travel, The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum The word Cooperstown is often used as a metonym for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, where 27-year-old Whitney Selover has served as Director of Special Events and Travel for the past five years. You’ve heard it said that nothing is more American than baseball – with the exception of perhaps, apple pie. The proof is in the pudding, so to speak, as approximately 315,000 visitors travel to Cooperstown each year to visit the Baseball Hall of Fame. “The passion that people have for baseball is remarkable,” notes Whitney. “It’s grasp on American hearts is unmatched.” Surprisingly, it’s not the history or iconic culture of the game that intrigues Whitney the most. “I was born and raised in Cooperstown but baseball was never really on my radar,” she admits. In fact, the first time Whitney set foot in the renowned Baseball Hall of Fame was the night before her internship began there in 2006, just before her senior year at Villanova University. “I don’t know a lot about the game of baseball or the stats of those who havemade it their career,” she confesses with a smile. But her lack of passion for the game hasn’t hindered hersuccess. If anything, it’s propelled her forward because stardom doesn’t stand in the way. “To me, they’re justpeople like you and me. It’s my job to help them and their families with the logistics of getting to Cooperstownand having a good experience.”Baseball fans everywhere chomp at the bit to rub shoulders with ballplayers who are at the pinnacle of theircareer. However, Whitney’s fulfillment comes not from meeting the inductees, but from meeting their families.“I have the honor of interacting with the moms and dads who drove these players to and from Little Leagueevery day before anyone else knew their name. They sacrificed so much and it’s truly awe-inspiring to see howmuch it means to them.”Her favorite part of the job is seeing the popular Baseball Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony come to fruitionafter working hard on it all year. She calls it a “product of love” to see an inductee on stage reading his speechwhile his wife is moved to tears. “That’s usually when I start crying,” she says with quietness.It’s no wonder, when you consider the values Whitney’s parents instilled in her. The youngest of three and theonly daughter, Whitney grew up understanding the importance of gaining perspective from other people. “Youdon’t really know anything about yourself until you go to another country and experience another culture.”Whitney’s international studies in Australia, England, and Taiwan taught her that people all around the globehave very similar needs and wants. “We’re not that different from each other,” she says. “There are certainuniversal standards that transcend skin color and cultural attire. You can really disarm your prejudices by seeingpeople for who they are regardless of differences.” Business Administration 220 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222 P: 518.442.4964 | F: 518.442.4975 E: dpurdy@albany.edu | Twitter: @UAlbanyMBA W: albany.edu/business/weekendmba | Google+: plus.google.com Facebook: facebook.com/weekendmba | LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/donpurdy YouTube: youtube.com/ualbanymba | SlideShare: slideshare.net/UAlbanyMBA
  • 2. A global study exchange student with the Rotary Foundation, Whitney traveled to Taiwan in the spring of 2011.Likening that particular language barrier to the Great Wall of China, Whitney learned communication happensthrough body language, actions, and shared values. “I discovered people are people no matter where they live,”she expounds. “We care about our families and we empathize with friends and loved ones who are struggling.”Whitney Selover always knew she would pursue her Masters one day because her parents encouraged her toembrace it as part of her journey. The unanswered question was simply deciding where. “I needed to findsomething that fit my busy schedule,” she says. “I didn’t want to do it online because my hands-on experienceshad been so positive with my internships and studies abroad.”After considering specialized programs for sports management and special events, Whitney chose the Universityat Albany Weekend MBA Program for its broader business foundation and cohort structure. “The cohortstructure is a brilliant opportunity to interact with other professionals,” explains Whitney. “Professors andtextbooks can’t give you everything. UAlbany’s diverse, challenging cohort structure is the perfect way to learnbecause the whole class is in it together.”Having just started the UAlbany Weekend MBA Program in August 2012, Whitney is pleased with how she’salready expanded her professional network. “Learning from 29 different perspectives holds great value for mepersonally. And hopefully I’ll be able to impact my classmates’ lives, too. The goal is to better each other.”The final element of the Hall of Fames motto, ‘Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations’is what drives Whitney Selover. “We actually have a lot more in common than we think or believe,” she shares.“Once we recognize that, we have the freedom to really open up our minds.”Suffice it to say, if Whitney had a motto of her own, it may very well be, “Work hard. Play hard. Learn hard. Livehard.”Connect with Whitney Selover here:LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/whitney-selover/40/649/39aFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/whitney.seloverFor additional information on the program, please contact Program Director Don Purdy at dpurdy@albany.edu,at 518.442.4964, or at @UAlbanyMBA. Business Administration 220 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222 P: 518.442.4964 | F: 518.442.4975 E: dpurdy@albany.edu | Twitter: @UAlbanyMBA W: albany.edu/business/weekendmba | Google+: plus.google.com Facebook: facebook.com/weekendmba | LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/donpurdy YouTube: youtube.com/ualbanymba | SlideShare: slideshare.net/UAlbanyMBA