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Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
Mhc 150
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Mhc 150

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  • 1. Venders and Waiters in Chinatown<br />by: Matthew Taylor<br />
  • 2. What About Them?<br />Chinatown’s illegal immigrants have very limited employment options when they first enter the country.<br />Getting a job often requires them to become involved in ethnic enclaves, and they are usually assigned jobs in Chinatown’s food industry.<br />The two jobs that I will be focusing on are waiters and street vendors in Chinatown <br />
  • 3. Income Statistics<br />The US Census Bureau reported in 2008 that 36% of American households earning over $100,000 a year were Asian, and that 19.4% of Asian Americans earn between $100,000 and $150,000<br />17.4% of households in New York County (Chinatown) earn less than $30,000 a year and 14.5% of all Americans making under $30,000 are Asian. <br />
  • 4. Struggles of being an Illegal Waiter<br />THE LAW!! – Many waiters in Chinatown are illegal immigrants, so they must hide that illegal status at all costs.<br />Wages – Owners and Managers often take advantage of their waiters’ illegal status by underpaying them.<br />Blackmail – Along with being underpaid, many immigrants are threatened on terms of rape, torture, and kidnapping to work long hours and short breaks.<br />
  • 5. Why Waiters Can’t Defend Themselves<br />They’re illegal – They can’t blow their cover.<br />Blackmail – self-explanatory<br />They don’t want their restaurants to go out of business. If they consult a Union, their restaurant will be forced to pay them more. But if the restaurant can’t afford these higher wages, it may close down altogether.<br />
  • 6. Street Venders<br />They sell things on the streets<br />Many Chinatown street vendors are also illegal immigrants, and face the same types of problems that waiters do, including having to hide their illegal status and being blackmailed.<br />Waiters pay high rent to the heads of their enclave to claim their spots on the more commercial streets of Chinatown.<br />
  • 7. Struggles of a Street Vendor<br />Street Vendors wake up really early to unload their goods, set up their carts, and catch morning commuters. They close up really late at night too.<br />They deal with pretty bad weather conditions year round, and it get’s boring standing around all day.<br />High competition, as many vendors sell the same goods.<br />Not only does paying rent seem impossible, but it definitely doesn’t seem worth it.<br />
  • 8. Criminalizing Street Vending<br />Councilwoman Margaret Chin wants to ban the purchase of fake designer merchandise, employing a $1000 fine or a year in jail.<br />Many vendors specialize in fake designer goods such as Guchi, LooweyVuitton, and Rolexxx, so this bill will effectively destroy their business<br />They’re illegal, no real fallout plan.<br />
  • 9. Conclusion<br />They got it really bad.<br />

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