Manta Rays<br />By <br />Giuseppe Bernal  & Yesica Diaz<br />
General Background<br />Tropical Waters of the world, typically around coral reefs.<br />Atlantic Oceans including the reg...
Environmental Conditions<br />Warm Waters, tropical areas. <br />They can live in both fresh water and Salt water (lagoons...
Organisms<br />
AdaptationsGlobal Warming<br />Good News<br />Good news for Mantas since the water becomes warmer due to global warming, t...
Species Interactions<br />Manta rays live along the coral reefs. <br />They share locations with many small fish.<br />Man...
Human Effects<br />Manta rays are very curious when it comes to Divers.<br />Humans that touch Manta Rays can cause the mu...
Interesting Stuff<br />Manta rays are one of the largest living fish besides sharks.<br />They are very fast, thought they...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manta_ray<br />http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/07/manta-rays/barcott-text<br />http://...
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Manta rays

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This power point is from my Marine Biology Class at Maywood Academy.

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Manta rays

  1. 1. Manta Rays<br />By <br />Giuseppe Bernal & Yesica Diaz<br />
  2. 2. General Background<br />Tropical Waters of the world, typically around coral reefs.<br />Atlantic Oceans including the regions of South Carolina, Brazil, and Bermuda. <br />They are also know to be in the North including the areas of New Jersey and extending all the way down to San Diego, California.<br />Mantas aren’t very difficult to understand. They linger along the coastlines. They will stay around the shore and very close to the top of the water.<br />
  3. 3. Environmental Conditions<br />Warm Waters, tropical areas. <br />They can live in both fresh water and Salt water (lagoons, lakes, oceans, swamps, and coastlines).<br />Manta rays tend to stay close to the shore were they can find plenty of food, such as Plankton and Algae. <br />The venture off to the deep when there is not enough food to find on the surface.<br />Climate change definitely affects the mantas, as long as the water is warm, mantas can travel deep down into the ocean.<br />Mantas can mate any time of the year.<br />
  4. 4. Organisms<br />
  5. 5. AdaptationsGlobal Warming<br />Good News<br />Good news for Mantas since the water becomes warmer due to global warming, their habitat has been able to expand.<br />They can travel deeper into the ocean<br />Bad News<br />Mantas travel off and live on lagoons and lakes.<br />These types of places can easily dry up due to the heat<br />Then manta rays die, no room to move around in.<br />
  6. 6. Species Interactions<br />Manta rays live along the coral reefs. <br />They share locations with many small fish.<br />Manta rays have to share their food with whale sharks due to the fact that they are both filter eaters.<br />
  7. 7. Human Effects<br />Manta rays are very curious when it comes to Divers.<br />Humans that touch Manta Rays can cause the mucus to be removed, that can make them prone to viruses or bacteria found in the water.<br />Their have been many stories of manta rays helping lost humans back up to the surface.<br />Thought in Peru and in the Philippines, Manta rays have been hunted down for their Meat and oil.<br />Manta rays have never harmed humans.<br />
  8. 8. Interesting Stuff<br />Manta rays are one of the largest living fish besides sharks.<br />They are very fast, thought they seem to move effortless thought the water.<br />They can also leap out of the water. <br />And their tail is relatively short, and there is no stinging spine.<br />Manta rays have their young inside a thin shell that hatches inside the mother.<br />
  9. 9. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manta_ray<br />http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/07/manta-rays/barcott-text<br />http://marinebio.org/species.asp?id=49<br />http://www.mantaray-world.com/<br />http://www.elasmo-research.org/education/topics/lh_manta.htm<br />

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