Music 4.5 Goes Practical
16th September 2010
Adam Street Private Members Club
Event partners
Music 4.5 is organised by
Scott Cohen, The Orchard
Local growth first or global reach immediately?
3
TM ®
4
5
Monetize Audiences
Not Content
7
Level of Spend
High
Low
Low High
Digital Music
Engagement
ADCS
P 11% / £ 23%
Generation
Free
P 9% / £ 1%
Traditional Phy...
8
Olly Murs - UK
Amoroso Alessandra - Italy
Script - Ireland
Yolanda Be Cool – GermanyTaio Cruz - Spain
Collectif Metisse ...
9
10
TM ®
Patrik Larsson, Headlock Management
Music and music technology service as export
commodity?
Gregor Pryor, Reed Smith
Practical issues to consider: licensing, different
jurisdictions, glocal routes to market
Music 4.5 Goes Practical
Practical issues to consider
Gregor Pryor
Reed Smith LLP
16 September 2010
About Reed Smith LLP
 Top 15 law firm in the world, over 1,800 lawyers
 Dedicated Media and Technology practice
consisti...
Practical issues to consider
Why we are qualified to talk about this
 Advise digital music services that represent well
o...
Orientation
1. Setting the scene
2. Establishing licensing parameters
3. How to obtain licences
4. Practical approach to l...
Setting the Scene
GLOBAL
 Entire music industry worth £3.9bn in 2009, up 5%
on 2008.
 Recorded music industry, including...
Setting the Scene
UK
 PRS for Music collected £511m in 2009, up 4.1%.
 Business-to-business revenues including
businesse...
Setting the Scene
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle
 Napster attracted 16.4 million users ...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Napster - True or false?
 The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE
 Napster attracted 16.4 million u...
Setting the Scene
Winners..
Setting the Scene
Not so much winners..
Establishing licensing parameters
 Is a licence needed?
 What is a licence needed for?
 Who gives the licence?
 What k...
Establishing licensing parameters
In context of digital music distribution, some
relevant factors to decide who needs a
li...
Establishing licensing parameters
Whether for downloads or streaming, a
licence will be needed for these rights:
 Reprodu...
How to obtain licences
 Record Label – for certain uses of sound
recordings, such as on-demand, downloads
and synch right...
How to obtain licences
 Record label licences – subject to individual
negotiation.
 PPL licences – PPL offers various on...
How to obtain licences
The traditional model of collective management:
 Performing right societies represented the global...
How to obtain licences
 Any multi-territory online music service
provider in Europe had to obtain licences
from the colle...
How to obtain licences
 The desired outcome for music service providers of
obtaining a pan-European licence for the globa...
Practical approach to licensing
 But first, do you need to?
PPL offers licences for:
 Non-interactive radio (streamed on...
Practical approach to licensing
 Answer: go straight to the labels.
 Approach each major and aggregators (for
indies)
 ...
Practical approach to licensing
 Understand the label’s repertoire and latest strategy
 Network and approach the right p...
Practical approach to licensing
Core terms for licence agreement:
 Sufficiently wide grant of rights
 Assurances concern...
Things to do
 Seek a licence when one is required
 Set a clear timetable and be persistent
 Ask questions and more ques...
Things not to do
 Seek a licence when one isn’t required
 Confuse which label owns which repertoire
 Be aggressive or s...
Contact
Gregor Pryor
Partner
Global Digital Media Team
Phone: +44 (0)203 1163536
Email: gpryor@reedsmith.com
Twitter: @gre...
Music 4.5 Goes Practical
16th September 2010
Adam Street Private Members Club
Event partners
Music 4.5 is organised by
Panel discussion: which strategies for what
service/product/situation
Moderated by: Grant Murgatroyd, Corporate Financier
...
Pitch Presentation:
Joey Baxter, Eventbox
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
 eventbox let's you search, listen to and
watch interactive event listings f...
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
How does eventbox make money?
1. Ticket sales - eventbox takes a 5% commissio...
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
Who are the competitors?
There is no competitor offering exactly what eventbo...
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
Team
• Joey Baxter, Founder
Proven background in sales. Family of entrepreneu...
©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
What we want
• £40K seed funding for proof of concept in Brighton:
Legal £3K
...
Pitch Presentation:
Martin Macmillan, Fireplayer
Pitch Presentation:
Ian Pickard, Gigaboxx
for you
for everyone
Gigaboxx, keeping it live
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does n...
Live and direct
Gigaboxx is a revolutionary new mobile music
download service which allows artists and
record companies to...
Mobile stores, which were designed specifically
with the music industry in mind, are quickly
produced and managed, via a u...
Included in the standard package is a direct-2-
audience marketing tool set. This includes QR
codes and a SMS reply servic...
Benefits
You can change content on the fly - it’s
immediate. Meaning artists/record labels can now
upload different videos...
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of the ve...
Pitch Presentation:
Kat Jackman, www.unsignedbandreview.com
Introduction
• Kat Jackman, Founder, UBR
• UBR is a unique web based music industry
service, and media platform
• I am loo...
Problem
• Major label deals diminishing
• DIY approach is the way forward for artists
• There are over 800,000 bands on My...
Solution
• www.unsignedbandreview.com
• Online feedback from top music industry experts
• A panel of credible experts
• Cu...
Revenue
• Display advertising and sponsorship - online,
events and through apps
• Subscriptions
• Classified advertising s...
History
• We have 5K bands on UBR database
• Get over 1 million ad impressions per month
• I have already sold advertising...
Investment
• £200K investment
• To develop user generated content features
online
• To build technology so that the review...
Summary
• Millions of bands worldwide seeking access to
the music industry
• We are a unique service where bands can get
i...
THANK YOU!
• kat@unsignedbandreview.com
• 07717213639
• Kat Jackman – Founder
Music 4.5 Goes Practical
16th September 2010
Adam Street Private Members Club
Event partners
Music 4.5 is organised by
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
Music4 5 goes practical - final
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Music4 5 goes practical - final

  1. 1. Music 4.5 Goes Practical 16th September 2010 Adam Street Private Members Club Event partners Music 4.5 is organised by
  2. 2. Scott Cohen, The Orchard Local growth first or global reach immediately?
  3. 3. 3 TM ®
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5 Monetize Audiences Not Content
  6. 6. 7 Level of Spend High Low Low High Digital Music Engagement ADCS P 11% / £ 23% Generation Free P 9% / £ 1% Traditional Physical 23% / £ 4% Physical Fanatics P 11% / £ 11% Budget Conscious P 8% / £1% MOs P 11% / £26% Going Digital P 15% / £ 31% Digital Dabblers P12% / £2%
  7. 7. 8 Olly Murs - UK Amoroso Alessandra - Italy Script - Ireland Yolanda Be Cool – GermanyTaio Cruz - Spain Collectif Metisse - France
  8. 8. 9
  9. 9. 10 TM ®
  10. 10. Patrik Larsson, Headlock Management Music and music technology service as export commodity?
  11. 11. Gregor Pryor, Reed Smith Practical issues to consider: licensing, different jurisdictions, glocal routes to market
  12. 12. Music 4.5 Goes Practical Practical issues to consider Gregor Pryor Reed Smith LLP 16 September 2010
  13. 13. About Reed Smith LLP  Top 15 law firm in the world, over 1,800 lawyers  Dedicated Media and Technology practice consisting of over 80 lawyers globally  Ranked Tier 1 in Chambers 2010 and Legal 500 for Media and Entertainment and acknowledged expertise in Digital Music  Featured ‘Wired 100’ most influential people in digital media  Disproportionate number of lawyers who were previously in-house counsel
  14. 14. Practical issues to consider Why we are qualified to talk about this  Advise digital music services that represent well over 90% of the market  Involved in a large number of key cases concerning digital music, including Tribunals, CISAC and copyright reform initiatives  Rated top-tier by directories based on industry expertise  “Unrivalled experience in the [digital music] market” – Legal 500
  15. 15. Orientation 1. Setting the scene 2. Establishing licensing parameters 3. How to obtain licences 4. Practical approach to licensing 5. Helpdesk
  16. 16. Setting the Scene GLOBAL  Entire music industry worth £3.9bn in 2009, up 5% on 2008.  Recorded music industry, including physical and digital sales, was £1.36bn in 2009, same as in 2008.  Live music revenues – including direct ticket sales, secondary ticketing and 'on the night' spend – have increased by 9.4% to £1.5bn, but have slowed from 2008's outstanding growth of 13%.  Business-to-consumer revenues – including live concerts and recorded music sales, grew 4.8% to £2.9bn – 75% of the total industry.
  17. 17. Setting the Scene UK  PRS for Music collected £511m in 2009, up 4.1%.  Business-to-business revenues including businesses using music, direct licensing of music services and sponsorship totalled £967m, up 4.4% on 2008.  Recorded music revenues in the UK are larger than the US per head, $26.52 per head in Britain compared to $15.08 in the US.  “Flat is the new up” – Will Page, PRS Economist.
  18. 18. Setting the Scene
  19. 19. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  20. 20. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  21. 21. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  22. 22. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms TRUE  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  23. 23. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms TRUE  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt TRUE  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  24. 24. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms TRUE  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt TRUE  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings TRUE  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  25. 25. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms TRUE  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt TRUE  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings TRUE  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings TRUE  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company
  26. 26. Napster - True or false?  The company was majority-owned by Shawn Fanning’s uncle TRUE  Napster attracted 16.4 million users in less than 12 months and had 40 million users at the time of the injunction after 18 months FALSE  Majors were set to invest in the business but could not agree terms TRUE  At the height of the legal controversy, Shawn Fanning introduced Britney Spears at the MTV VMA’s while wearing a Metallica t-shirt TRUE  The head of ‘new media’ at Universal Music wore a Napster t-shirt to staff meetings TRUE  Chuck D submitted a declaration in support of Napster in the infringement proceedings TRUE  Bertelsmann lost $45m trying to buy the company FALSE
  27. 27. Setting the Scene Winners..
  28. 28. Setting the Scene Not so much winners..
  29. 29. Establishing licensing parameters  Is a licence needed?  What is a licence needed for?  Who gives the licence?  What kind of licence is needed?  Is there a licence that fits my business model? If not, can I create one?
  30. 30. Establishing licensing parameters In context of digital music distribution, some relevant factors to decide who needs a licence include:  Who is undertaking what restricted act?  On whose server does the music sit?  How is the music delivered?  Who contracts with customers?
  31. 31. Establishing licensing parameters Whether for downloads or streaming, a licence will be needed for these rights:  Reproduction (“mechanical”)  Communication to the public (“performing”)  Adaptation?  Synchronisation? Separate licences will be needed for both the musical composition and the sound recording (including performers’ rights).
  32. 32. How to obtain licences  Record Label – for certain uses of sound recordings, such as on-demand, downloads and synch rights.  PPL – for certain uses of sound recordings, such as interactive streaming and webcasting.  PRS for Music – for mechanical and performing rights in musical compositions.  Publisher – for adaptation and synch rights in musical compositions.
  33. 33. How to obtain licences  Record label licences – subject to individual negotiation.  PPL licences – PPL offers various online and mobile music licences and these are subject to individual negotiation.  PRS licences – PRS offers various online and mobile music licences and these can be negotiated – see hand out for details.  Publisher licences – subject to individual negotiation.  Artist direct licences – increasingly prevalent.
  34. 34. How to obtain licences The traditional model of collective management:  Performing right societies represented the global music repertoire exclusively in their territory  This resulted from their networks of reciprocal representation agreements…  …and in particular it resulted from the membership and territoriality exclusivity clauses
  35. 35. How to obtain licences  Any multi-territory online music service provider in Europe had to obtain licences from the collecting society in each country  No pan-European single licence available from a collecting society
  36. 36. How to obtain licences  The desired outcome for music service providers of obtaining a pan-European licence for the global repertoire from a single collecting society has not been achieved.  Pan-European licences for major publishers’ repertoire can be obtained from some societies.  So now, instead of having to deal with societies in each territory to obtain a licence for the global repertoire, a provider needs to do that for some of the repertoire, but for major publishers’ catalogues some of the societies can grant pan-European licences.
  37. 37. Practical approach to licensing  But first, do you need to? PPL offers licences for:  Non-interactive radio (streamed online radio)  Customised radio (allows user to stream content and skip, pause, rate and influence the content they receive)  On-demand programme streaming This leaves some gaps: what about downloads? Or truly on-demand services (like MOG or we7)?
  38. 38. Practical approach to licensing  Answer: go straight to the labels.  Approach each major and aggregators (for indies)  Be prepared for what they will ask for in return for a licence: per stream rate, equity, advance, guarantee, MFN Majors (+ Merlin) are reported to own stock in
  39. 39. Practical approach to licensing  Understand the label’s repertoire and latest strategy  Network and approach the right person and identify who makes the decisions  Focus on how you will make money for the rightsholder  Use simple, catchy presentations that outline commercial objectives for the discussions  Be prepared to talk about technological implementation  Be sensitive to label’s objectives
  40. 40. Practical approach to licensing Core terms for licence agreement:  Sufficiently wide grant of rights  Assurances concerning catalogue availability and exclusive content  Competitive royalty rate and terms  Timely and accurate delivery of assets  Comfort concerning rights clearances  Fair termination provisions
  41. 41. Things to do  Seek a licence when one is required  Set a clear timetable and be persistent  Ask questions and more questions  Focus on positive, revenue-generating opportunities for the label  Entertain them  Prepare for robust negotiation and be empathetic to label’s objectives  Seek solutions and make suggestions
  42. 42. Things not to do  Seek a licence when one isn’t required  Confuse which label owns which repertoire  Be aggressive or score points  Fail to understand your technology or underestimate rightsholders’ understanding of it  Escalate without notice and consultation  Use the words “promotional”, “anti-competitive”, “royalty-free” or “P2P”  Be unprepared, vague or defensive  Wear ‘cool’ clothing or try to act ‘cool’
  43. 43. Contact Gregor Pryor Partner Global Digital Media Team Phone: +44 (0)203 1163536 Email: gpryor@reedsmith.com Twitter: @gregorpryor
  44. 44. Music 4.5 Goes Practical 16th September 2010 Adam Street Private Members Club Event partners Music 4.5 is organised by
  45. 45. Panel discussion: which strategies for what service/product/situation Moderated by: Grant Murgatroyd, Corporate Financier Magazine Scott Cohen, The Orchard Patrik Larsson, Headlock Management Helienne Lindvall, singer, songwriter, journalist with The Guardian Gregor Pryor, Reed Smith
  46. 46. Pitch Presentation: Joey Baxter, Eventbox
  47. 47. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL  eventbox let's you search, listen to and watch interactive event listings for all your favourite venues and acts, buy tickets to them, as well as letting you create your own events.
  48. 48. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL
  49. 49. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL How does eventbox make money? 1. Ticket sales - eventbox takes a 5% commission on the face value of each ticket sale generated through the service 2. Venues, service providers and event sponsors pay an annual subscription to use eventbox’s interactive marketing tools 3. eventbox provides Sponsorship / Advertising which is highly targeted against music type and audience profile
  50. 50. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL Who are the competitors? There is no competitor offering exactly what eventbox offers: • MySpace - Allows you to create interactive event listings and publish them to your social networks. • Last.fm - Event listings with venue details and music from event line ups. Sometimes events have links to buy tickets. • Time Out - The best known brand for event listings in some of the world’s major cities. • Songkick - Event listings for most music gigs and lots of handy tools including being told about events you like when they are listed. • Spoonfed - Event listings on a map, making it easy to find events near where you are, where you will be or where you might be.
  51. 51. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL Team • Joey Baxter, Founder Proven background in sales. Family of entrepreneurs for generations. • Jay Fenton, Technology Consultant Proven track record in founding technology based companies. • Roland Glover, Non-Exec Director, PR and Marketing Consultant Founder and Director of entertainment marketing agency Neon that includes Microsoft, Xbox, MTV, Diesel, Talk Talk, Disney as clients. • Petra Johansson, Non-Exec Director, Event Management Consultant Founder of Event Management company Twisted Tree. Co-founder of Music 4.5 event examining the development of the music industry in the digital age. • Simon Brooker, Graphic Design Director of a graphic design and identity creation practice. • David Naylor, Advisor FFW law firm partner. Specialises in working with technology, media, communications and IP focused businesses and investors.
  52. 52. ©eventbox/J Baxter 2010STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL What we want • £40K seed funding for proof of concept in Brighton: Legal £3K Technical Development £20K Operations £5K People £5K RR and Marketing £7K • A Technical Lead
  53. 53. Pitch Presentation: Martin Macmillan, Fireplayer
  54. 54. Pitch Presentation: Ian Pickard, Gigaboxx
  55. 55. for you for everyone Gigaboxx, keeping it live Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of the vendor or its representatives.
  56. 56. Live and direct Gigaboxx is a revolutionary new mobile music download service which allows artists and record companies to quickly and easily build their own mobile music stores. This then enables them to sell direct to their audience (using a suite of marketing tools), by delivering their site URL (web address) direct to the live audience’s mobile phones – at the point when they are most likely to make an impulse purchase.
  57. 57. Mobile stores, which were designed specifically with the music industry in mind, are quickly produced and managed, via a user-friendly online wizard. The artist or record companies can then add tracks, videos, gig lists and much more. This is all achieved without incurring the expense of an application, which might only work on a specific make and model of smart phone. Gigaboxx believe that in order for bands to effectively reach an audience and sell product, they must cater for the majority of all phone users, rather than targeting a specific group though just applications. So the Gigaboxx system works across all mobile platforms, delivering the best user experience possible. The system also empowers bands to deliver unique content and control how that content is delivered. Changing content is now in the hands of the record company or artist. • • • • • Benefits
  58. 58. Included in the standard package is a direct-2- audience marketing tool set. This includes QR codes and a SMS reply service. An artist can print both the QR code and short code numbers on all their promotional material, plus post them to all their favourite social network communities and blogs, dragging an audience back into their Gigaboxx mobile site. Gigaboxx also supplies and sells local Wifi and Bluetooth solutions, which detect a fan’s phone with their Bluetooth or Wifi enabled, and then transmit the site URL. Fans can make a purchase there and then through an all new one click micro payment system called Payforit, which is compatible with all mobile phones and is supported by all the major phone networks. Downloads are billed direct to a fans mobile phone bill, or deducted from their pay-as-you-go credit. Gigaboxx is also able to give artists/record companies a valuable insight into their fan base via the data and analytics collected from download sales. • • • • Benefits
  59. 59. Benefits You can change content on the fly - it’s immediate. Meaning artists/record labels can now upload different videos and remixes, depending on the historic geographic data build up using the system. For example a re-mixes EP for Manchester or a unique video for Bristol. They can also sell single tracks, albums, images and merchandise – and of course it’s fully sync-able with platforms like Facebook and Twitter.” Sign up to the service will be free from next week. • •
  60. 60. Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of the vendor or its representatives. For more information, go to http://www.gigaboxx.net or contact the following: Ian Pickard, MD Gigaboxx, Co-founder ian@gigaboxx.com 07774 216650 Hugh Stanley-Clarke, Co-founder hugh@gigaboxx.com 07956 342682
  61. 61. Pitch Presentation: Kat Jackman, www.unsignedbandreview.com
  62. 62. Introduction • Kat Jackman, Founder, UBR • UBR is a unique web based music industry service, and media platform • I am looking for investment to develop user generated content features, ecommerce/subscriptions, and sales staff to sell advertising online.
  63. 63. Problem • Major label deals diminishing • DIY approach is the way forward for artists • There are over 800,000 bands on Myspace • The majority of these bands are looking for feedback to know how to improve and ‘industry’ access
  64. 64. Solution • www.unsignedbandreview.com • Online feedback from top music industry experts • A panel of credible experts • Currently have Warner Bros, Sony, Universal, NME, Radio One, Kerrang!, Ministry of Sound, and many other big players in the music industry who give feedback to artists • Other useful information, editorials, tips and links for artists
  65. 65. Revenue • Display advertising and sponsorship - online, events and through apps • Subscriptions • Classified advertising sales • Affiliates • Downloads (phase 2)
  66. 66. History • We have 5K bands on UBR database • Get over 1 million ad impressions per month • I have already sold advertising to Xbox, Smirnoff, Levi, Quiksilver, Sony • I have put my time and money into UBR for the past two years • I recently won the Daily Mail Enterprising Young Brit awards and received an award from Peter Mandelson for UBR
  67. 67. Investment • £200K investment • To develop user generated content features online • To build technology so that the review service is managed on a CMS and I don’t have to manage it • To build the phone app. and facebook app. • Sales, marketing and PR
  68. 68. Summary • Millions of bands worldwide seeking access to the music industry • We are a unique service where bands can get industry access • Proven advertising and subscriptions revenue • Need investment to launch new online features to generate more ad inventory for brands and ecommerce for subscriptions service
  69. 69. THANK YOU! • kat@unsignedbandreview.com • 07717213639 • Kat Jackman – Founder
  70. 70. Music 4.5 Goes Practical 16th September 2010 Adam Street Private Members Club Event partners Music 4.5 is organised by

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