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Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
Group presentation
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Group presentation

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Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Four Reasons To Ask Questions Control/ Organization Discover Direct Student Learning Create Critical Thinking
  • 3. L ayering D eciding F ocusing E xtending
  • 4.  
  • 5.
    • Evaluation
    • A way to find things out/gain insight into ones abilities
    • A positive component of the educational system if fairly and honestly applied
    • Applies to everything we do in life!
    • Reasons for Evaluation
    • To find out what is happening in the classroom
    • To find things out about students as well as oneself as a teacher
    • Provides the opportunity to see students in a variety of different and important ways, and if done well, it enables students to grow and mature
    • Encourages self evaluation where by the student has a sense of investment and responsibility in their own education, and therefore, their future
    • Goal of Education
    • Intellectual Maturity!
  • 6. How Do Teachers Evaluate? Alternative Methods of Evaluation Dilemmas of Constant Evaluation What Are We Evaluating? Why Do Teachers Evaluate? Principles Of Evaluation Evaluation
  • 7. 3 Principles Of Evaluation Criteria C=S Diverse S=ET IF
  • 8.
    • Principle #1: (Criteria Comprehension=Success)
    • Students should know and understand the criteria teachers use to judge what is:
    • Good/Bad
    • Correct/Incorrect
    • Successful/Unsuccessful
    • Principle #2: (Diverse Students=Diverse Evaluative Tools)
    • Every student is uniquely individual, therefore, to accurately gain insight into students knowledge, understanding, and abilities, it is important to use a variety of evaluative tools.
    • Principle #3: (Immediate Feedback)
    • Students should receive immediate feedback from their teachers as it encourages and motivates
  • 9.  
  • 10.
    • Diagnosis
    • Creating Marks for a Report Card
    • Encouraging Self Improvement
    • Reporting and Discussing Students with Parents
  • 11.
    • Use of a learning journal can help students to track how far they have come in their learning and give them something to be proud of.
  • 12. http://rapidbi.com/management/learninglogs-learningjournals/ My Learning Journal What were three main things I learned from this unit? What have I changed my mind about, as a result of this session? What did we not cover that I expected we should? One thing I learned in this session that I may be able to use in future is… I am still unsure about…
  • 13.
    • Do you believe that final grades are representative of a students learning?
    • How do you plan to differentiate evaluation to include all learning styles and make evaluation fair?
  • 14.  
  • 15.
    • Two forms of evaluation are often referred to as summative and formative.
  • 16.
    • Definition: Evaluation that leads to on-sight decision-making.
    • An example of formative evaluation would be a mad minute in math class, it is quick and allows you to know if the students are learning a particular topic in class.
  • 17.
    • Definition: Evaluation that wraps-up and serves as a final grading of what students have learned after the topic or unit has been completed.
    • An example of summative evaluation would be a final exam or a report card that gives final grades.
  • 18.
    • If we are evaluating everything this would mean not all evaluations would be formal.
    • What are the benefits of constant evaluation?
    • By evaluating everything it shows students that what you as a teacher are asking students to do is important.
    • By evaluating constantly you can easily have enough material to create a formal final evaluation such as a report card.
    • When students know their work will “count for marks” they tend to take their work seriously and strive to do well on assignments.
  • 19.
    • There are 2 problems with constant evaluation,
    • Students think that the only form of evaluation is a test
    • Students become dependant on marks as a way to motivate themselves, while learning is supposed to be a self motivating activity
  • 20.
    • There are many different forms of evaluation besides exams
        • Writing assignments
        • Journal writing
        • Student presentations
        • Cooperative skills, ie: group work
        • Physical skills
  • 21.
    • Assessing knowledge and comprehension
    • Assessing the application of skills
    • Assessing higher level thinking skills (including analysis and synthesis)
    • Assessing critical thinking
  • 22. Video Interview!
  • 23.  
  • 24.
    • Be Diverse!
    • Be Creative!
  • 25.  
  • 26.
    • Student- created Review Games
    • Writing Rap Songs
    • Skits and plays
    • Creating Diagrams
    • Quizzes and Tests
    • Creating Word webs
  • 27.
    • Creating Quality Presentations
    • Completing Job Applications
    • Field Trips
    • Lab Work
    • Role-playing
    • Design Competitions
  • 28.
    • Portfolios
    • Writing Newspapers/articles
    • Designing a community
    • Book Studies
    • Problem Solving
  • 29.
    • Students Decide Goals
    • Students Become the Teacher
    • Students Design and carry out Questionnaires
  • 30.  
  • 31.
    • Journal Writing
    • Conferencing
    • Student Presentations
    • Website Creation
    • Modelling
    • Interpretive Dance
  • 32. Pictionary!
  • 33.  
  • 34. Goal/Intent/Focus/ Objective Nancy Brittany G Teresa Brittany K
    • Purpose:
    • Clearly Stated
    • Maintained
    • Accomplished
    • Organization:
    • Clear
    • Effective
    • Content:
    • Major Points Given
    • Supporting Details
    • Adequate Elaboration
    • Response to listeners:
    • Eye Contact
    • Clarification
    • Gestures & Facial Expressions
    • Voice Control:
    • For Effective Delivery
    Overall Impression
  • 35. Outside Sources
    • Robert Nellis and Randy Johnson
    • Inside and Outside Textbooks
    • rapidbi.com/management/learninglogs-learningjournals

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