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Social media are importantfortravellers whousethemtocollectinformation beforethe trip, butalsotoshare travelstoriesand writereviewsafterthe trip. Reviewswrittenbytravellers are ...

Social media are importantfortravellers whousethemtocollectinformation beforethe trip, butalsotoshare travelstoriesand writereviewsafterthe trip. Reviewswrittenbytravellers are becomingincreasinglyimportantforthe travelindustry

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    Unleashing the power_of_social_media_on_travel Unleashing the power_of_social_media_on_travel Presentation Transcript

    • Unleashing the Power of Social Media on Travel February 2011
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 2
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Introduction © Euromonitor International Scope • This briefing on the global trends for Travel and Tourism covers the following areas: Travel and Tourism Travel accommodation Transportation Car rental Social Media Travel retail Tourist attractions Health and wellness tourism Disclaimer Learn More Much of the information in this briefing is of a statistical nature and, while every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy and reliability, Euromonitor International cannot be held responsible for omissions or errors To find out more about Euromonitor International's complete range of business intelligence on industries, countries and consumers please visit www.euromonitor.com or contact your local Euromonitor International office: London +44 (0)20 7251 8024 Dubai +971 4 372 4363 Chicago +1 312 922 1115 Cape Town +27 21 552 0037 Singapore +65 6429 0590 Santiago +56 2 915 7200 Shanghai +86 21 6372 6288 Sydney +61 2 9275 8869 Vilnius +370 5 243 1577 Tokyo +81 3-5403-4790 Figures in tables and analyses are calculated from unrounded data and may not sum. Analyses found in the briefings may not totally reflect the companies’ opinions, reader discretion is advised 3
    • Introduction Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Key findings The Web 2.0 The development of Web 2.0 functionalities marked a turning point for the World Wide Web. In only five years social media have become an important part of people’s everyday life. Social media are a global phenomenon Social media grow on the back of the global internet. The main adopters are the young, but usage is spreading in more mature markets. Up to two thirds of internet users in developed economies use social media and this is growing. Social media types Social media include different types from social networks which are based on interaction among members (eg Facebook) to repositories of content (eg YouTube and Flickr) to specialist social media (eg TripAdvisor and Thorn Tree for travel). The importance of travel reviews Social media are important for travellers who use them to collect information before the trip, but also to share travel stories and write reviews after the trip. Reviews written by travellers are becoming increasingly important for the travel industry. Social media to engage customers Travel players such as tourism promotion boards, hotels, airlines and travel retailers are increasingly making use of social media to communicate with their customers also creating online communities in order to engage customers with their brands. The new travel retail landscape Today the internet is a key place where travel decisions are taken. Social media represent the social element of this new travel retail landscape where travellers can interact with their peers and with travel companies in order to make their choices. A customer service tool Social media marketing is not based on a “click and buy” model like search engine advertising but it is rather focused on brand awareness and customer loyalty. It has more to do with customer service and public relations than with advertising. The ultimate frontier of marketing In a way social media represent the ultimate frontier of marketing as they allow companies to monitor customer needs and respond to them in real time. The next five years will see marketing departments make a more systematic use of them. 4
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 5
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International The Web 2.0 phenomenon Web 2.0 Social Media Types • Web 2.0, the second generation of the World Wide Web, • Social media include different types of websites allowing indicates the move away from static web-pages in which content is entirely created centrally to dynamic usercreated content and online social networking. • Web 2.0 encompasses a number of behavioural trends: the sharing of information; self-publishing; the creation and uploading of photos, audio and video files; and making new friends online. • Web 2.0 technologies permit one-to-many communications, in addition to peer-to-peer. It is this characteristic that makes it so efficient as a means of advertising. users to interact with them posting and sharing content: 1. Social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, LinkedIn and Orkut; 2. Repositories for content which can then be shared such as YouTube and Flickr; 3. Other types including forums, message boards, podcasts, social bookmarking sites like delicious and social news sites like Digg or Reddit. Top Social Media Worldwide October 2010 Rank Site Unique visitors (million) Page views (million) Has adverts? Social media offer “social proof” that users are doing the acceptable thing: 1 Facebook 590 690,000 Yes 2 YouTube 490 77,000 Yes “We will use the actions of others to decide on proper behaviour for ourselves, especially when we view those others as similar to ourselves.” 3 Twitter 110 6,400 Yes 4 MySpace 61 7,100 Yes 5 Flickr 46 1,900 Yes Influence by Robert Cialdini (2007) 6 LinkedIn 45 2,500 Yes 7 Orkut 37 5,400 Yes Source: Doubleclick by Google Note: Monthly data 6
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International From Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 Web 1.0 Web 2.0 website website user user user user user user 7
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International Dynamics of social networks Six degrees of separation A “power-law” relationship • Clusters of “friends” are linked by less strong • There is a “power-law” relationship between the number “acquaintance” connections. Individuals even in a large network are only four to eight “friends of friends” away from any other member of the overall network. • Some people in a cluster have many loose acquaintances; they are disproportionately important to overall network connectivity, despite the lack of strength in the connections. • Similarly, some people have multiple diverse interests and are so members of multiple clusters. • Identifying and targeting these individuals can help the success of a social media campaign. of members in a network and their potential interaction. • For example, the number of peer-to-peer messages that can be sent in a network of 10 people is 90. However, in a network of 20 (ie twice the number of members), 380 messages can be sent (ie a multiple of 4.2). • The dedication of network members is another important factor; the hours members spend interacting can vary. • However, a user may not trust all his/her network equally. They will accept advice from those most like themselves, or those that can offer the most relevant advice (the opinion leaders in that field). The Importance of Scale The Importance of Acquaintances 800 20,000 600 15,000 400 10,000 Members 1000 25,000 Interactions 30,000 200 5,000 0 0 x1 Members x2 x3 x4 x5 Potential P2P interactions 8
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International Social media penetration The US is the largest market, but Europe is also growing rapidly • By absolute size of audience the US is by far the largest user of social media. • However, use of the internet to visit social media sites has increased in most countries over 2008-2010. • The greatest increase in usage is in Italy and France where usage doubled between 2008 and 2010. • Two thirds of Italians now use social media via the internet, more than in the UK or the US. • Almost 80% of Facebook users are now outside the US. • In Japan, social media have suffered competition from social communications via mobile phones (sms and email). This situation may change in the near future following the launch of mobile social media applications. Social Media Penetration % of Internet Users 2008/2010 70 66 62 58 60 % 50 64 54 50 33 40 40 34 33 32 27 30 20 10 0 UK France Germany 2008 Italy US Japan 2010 Source: Ofcom International Communications Market Report 2010 Base: Internet users aged 18+ 9
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International Demographic segmentation Highest popularity among the younger generations • Social media are especially popular in the 18-24 years age segment where they reach a penetration among internet users of around 80% in most developed economies, with the exception of Japan. • Penetration is however still significant in the age range 55-64 years reaching between 30% and 45% of internet users in developed countries, with the exception of Japan. Social Media Penetration % of Internet Users by Age 2010 100 90 80 % of users 70 86 81 77 73 81 79 78 70 64 60 62 54 48 50 65 45 44 42 64 62 60 54 49 48 44 41 35 40 30 30 40 25 23 20 13 10 0 UK France 18-24 Germany 25-34 35-44 Italy 45-54 US Japan 55-64 Source: Ofcom International Communications Market Report 2010 Base: Internet users aged 18+ 10
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media The Rise of Social Media © Euromonitor International Internet and broadband penetration Internet Users 2010 Million people UK People online 39.1 France Germany Italy US Japan 44.9 25.7 195.0 59.5 France Germany Italy US Japan 44.9 Broadband Penetration by Type 2010 % of households UK Fixed broadband connection 70 69 62 49 71 64 Mobile broadband connection (3G) 16 7 3 16 30 19 France Germany Italy US Japan Internet Access through Mobile Devices 2010 % of internet users Smartphone Tablet UK 29 26 18 23 27 43 3 2 2 3 3 4 Source: Ofcom International Communications Market Report 2010 11
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 12
    • Social Media and Travellers Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Use of social media by travellers Before the trip During the trip After the trip • Collecting information and suggestions • Choosing destinations and suppliers • Booking online or offline • Collecting information locally • Keeping in touch with friends, other travellers and locals • On-site booking online or offline (also through smartphones) • Share travel stories and experiences • Write hotel and destination reviews • Upload photos and videos 13
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media and Travellers © Euromonitor International Role of social media for leisure travellers Typical Social Networking Site Travel Social Media You Destination Friends People who’ve been there (travellers) Acquaintances You Focus on the destination Importance of opinion leaders • Social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn are • These travellers are opinion leaders for travelling to the • • • • based on strong links (eg “friends”). However, travel social media are based more on looser acquaintances and wider communities of interest. The emphasis of generalist social networks such as Facebook is on you and your friends; but the emphasis of travel social media is the destination. Your friends may not have gone to the destination either. Frequent travellers to one or more destinations become gurus on a travel site. destination they are specialists on and their role is particularly important. • A typical social networker will go to Facebook everyday and spend an hour online. The majority of use of travel social media will be episodic, perhaps even task-driven (eg “find a summer holiday”). • For this reason, leisure travellers are more willing to accept advice from strangers. • For the same reason, specialist social media in travel and tourism are more trusted by people to collect information and take decisions concerning their trips. 14
    • Social Media and Travellers Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Beyond Facebook - specialist social media in travel Details Site Cosmo- Set up in 2007, Cosmotourist is a travel “meeting place” where tips and reviews are tourist written and where questions can be posed to others who have already travelled to destinations around the world. 400,000 users. Dopplr Service for international travellers via mobile phone and computer. Dopplr members share personal and business travel plans privately with their networks. Acquired by Nokia in September 2009. Usage fell from 39,000 unique users to 29,000 in July 2009. Driven by a proprietary map, Driftr is a userDriftr generated content site “for travellers, by travellers”, providing photos and reviews. Epic Trip A multimedia travel search engine and social media providing reviews of destinations, attractions, and hotels; comparison shop for the lowest hotel rates; meet like-minded travellers. Everytrail For geo-tagged user-generated travel content; interactive maps including route photos. geojoey A Google maps mashup, geojoey provides a full-screen map with personal URL against which users can plot journeys, post photos and videos. here or Rate community travel experiences and add there own comment. iloho Established online travel communities where users can vote on user submitted stories. Site Lonely Planet Thorn Tree Matador Details Where the Lonely Planet travel community exchange travel advice, hints and tips. Matador Travel is a social media for passionate travellers, associated with glimpse.com. myTripBook myTripBook is a travel diary and forward planner that you can keep private, share with friends or have open to all. TravBuddy Find travel buddies, record travel experiences in travel blogs, or share travel tips and reviews. TravelPost A community “built by travel enthusiasts for travel enthusiasts”; reviews, photos and blogs. TripAdvisor TripAdvisor claims to be the largest travel site offering advice from real travellers, a wide variety of travel choices and planning features. TripConnect Founded in 2004 in New York City, TripConnect offers travel advice from friends or people with similar interests, and from established and relevant information sources. TripSay Users can share trip experiences and connect with travelling friends to exchange insider tips. TripWolf Social travel guide and trip planner based around a community of locals and travel gurus. Virtual A travel community where 1.2 million Tourist registered members from more than 220 countries share real travel advice and experiences. 15
    • Social Media and Travellers Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Empowering consumers Key for brand image and customer service • Major brand owners are using social media to enhance their customer service. • Delta, JetBlue, Southwest, Virgin America, Marriott, Starwood, Travelocity, Expedia, and Hertz all have staff • • • • specifically tasked with reacting to social media messages. The power of social media means good and bad news about a brand and service can be transmitted to all corners of the world in hours, forcing big brands to manage the process. A dissatisfied customer was once likely to tell up to 100 people, but if a complaint goes viral, it could now reach millions. Complaining on TripAdvisor, Facebook or Twitter is more effective than complaining in a traditional way; more people can overhear how the company treats you. And the threat of a bad review can give you leverage. However, the ease with which a bad review can be posted, or a Twitter complaint made, opens this embryonic customer service system to abuse. The threat of a bad review can also be perceived as blackmail. Advantages Disadvantages • Complaints can be magnified by the lens of • Complaining may be too easy; it risks petty or the social network • Everyone is listening, including executives in the companies receiving the complaint • Response times can be very quick • A bad review can be a trigger for change, helping the supplier with poor service to recognise its deficiencies mischievous complaints, or threats of blackmail • Beyond real people “trying it on”, some complaints may be injected into the system by travel companies or their competitors • It is difficult for social media to assess which reviews are genuine 16
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media and Travellers © Euromonitor International Case study: TripAdvisor World's largest travel site • TripAdvisor offers advice from other travellers and a • • • • • wide variety of travel choices and planning features (including Flights search, TripAdvisor Mobile and TripAdvisor Trip Friends) with links to booking tools. TripAdvisor websites make up what is claimed to be the largest travel community in the world: • 14 million unique monthly visitors; • 20 million members in 26 countries, including China; • Over 40 million reviews and opinions. TripAdvisor and the sites comprising the TripAdvisor Media Group are operating companies of Expedia Inc. However, TripAdvisor does not advertise only the offer of Expedia companies (such as Expedia, Hotels.com and Venere.com), but also of other companies such as Priceline/Booking.com, Lastminute and Orbitz. TripAdvisor is one of the most powerful websites in the travel industry and its reviews are also used by hotel companies to measure customer satisfaction. In December 2010, TripAdvisor launched an integration with Facebook which allows users to: see information on their Facebook friends’ trips; read their reviews before others; and share TripAdvisor reviews with them. TripAdvisor Users by Country October 2010 Rank Name Unique users % of total 1 US 6,000,000 42.9 2 UK 2,200,000 15.7 3 Italy 1,200,000 8.6 4 Canada 820,000 5.9 5 Spain 690,000 4.9 Others 3,090,000 22.1 TOTAL 14,000,000 100.0 Source: Doubleclick by Google data Note: Monthly data 17
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media and Travellers © Euromonitor International Hospitality sites and home exchange Hospitality Sites Home Exchange • Websites such as CouchSurfing.com and • Home exchange consists in spending holidays in other • • • • HospitalityClub.org have already been around for 10 years but have enjoyed a real boom over 2008-2010. Their mission is to put in contact travellers with people living in the places they visit. Travellers can ask locals for free hospitality but also just to meet them for a drink. Free hospitality is an important element of this type of travelling, especially in times of economic downturn. Saving money however is not the main goal of hospitality tourism; intercultural exchange is more important. Travellers are able to see how locals live, discovering a country and its culture from within and making their experience richer. CouchSurfers are not hotel guests, sightseeing on their own all day and getting back home late at night; instead they spend time with their hosts, sharing with them their travel and life experiences. • • • • people’s houses while they stay at yours. This is made possible by companies such as HomeExchange, Intervac and HomeLink. Members pay a small annual fee to get access to this service via the internet. This type of tourism started over 50 years ago through printed directories, but it has increased dramatically since the advent of the internet. The opportunity to benefit from a low cost holiday plays an important role in its growing popularity. Home exchange also benefits from the desire of travellers to have a more authentic travel experience, in the local community. The community is the product Hospitality and home exchange networks are travelrelated communities, not only exchanging hospitality but allowing a different way to travel. 18
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 19
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media and Travel Players © Euromonitor International How social media works for travel players Travel Players Distribute Upload information photos/videos Promote brands/ products Sell Receive travel services feedback Social Media Upload Share Write Ask Book photos/videos experiences reviews questions travel services Travellers 20
    • Social Media and Travel Players Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Social media and tourism promotion boards Tourism promotion boards are increasingly using social media to distribute tourist information, videos and photos, keep in touch with travellers and receive feedback. Brazil • The Brazilian tourism board created a successful YouTube channel to distribute videos about the country’s most important tourist destinations and attractions, as well as testimonials from people talking about Brazil. Australia • The Australia tourism board created the www.nothinglikeaustralia.com website where travellers to the country can share their experiences and readers can vote the most useful ones. Spain • Turespaña, the Spanish tourism board, created two specific websites to upload photos of trips to Spain and ask any questions about tourism to Spain. It is also possible to share travel experiences on its Facebook page. National Tourism Boards‟ Popularity on Selected Social Media 2010 Tourism board Australia New Zealand Spain Croatia Thailand Jamaica South Africa Iceland Ireland Facebook, Twitter, WAYN followers 966,581 282,945 265,125 173,968 114,649 102,647 78,502 54,914 45,411 Source: WAYN Note: Data for November 2010 France • Atout France, the French tourism board, created Facebook pages for each of the countries where it has offices in order to send travel news to Francophiles all over the world and receive their feedback. 21
    • Social Media and Travel Players Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Social media and hotels Hotel companies are present in social media such as Facebook, Twitter and TripAdvisor in order to distribute information to customers, receive feedback and answer questions. Hotels‟ Popularity on Facebook 2010 Hotel Facebook likes” Hilton Hotels 98,396 Best Western 65,067 Starwood Hotels 51,467 Accor Group 22,203 Global Hyatt 22,163 Marriott International (inc Courtyard) 19,190 Hyatt InterContinental Hotels Group 17,533 • Hyatt Hotels launched a Twitter account in 2009 and Wyndham Hotel Group Accor • In 2010, Accor entered a partnership with TripAdvisor. According to this agreement all Accor customers after their stay are sent an email inviting them to post a review which will be published on both Accorhotels.com and TripAdvisor websites. Reviews are available for all Accor Group’s brands and countries. staff based in Omaha, Australia and Mumbai respond to requests and questions “within an hour”, fielding all kinds of queries. The Twitter account has 12,000 followers. joie de vivre • joie de vivre hotels use Twitter to send an exclusive deal to around 10,000 followers. 6,912 Source: Facebook, December 2010 Marriott • Marriott is targeting members with large Facebook and Twitter followings to help spread positive messages about its SpringHill Suites chain in return for free stays and other incentives. 22
    • Social Media and Travel Players Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Social media and airlines Airlines maintain a presence on social media to push special fares as well as to respond to customer queries. Some airlines also sell tickets directly through Facebook, while Lufthansa created a website to post travel stories. Lufthansa • Lufthansa created the www.lufthansawefly.com website where travellers can share their travel stories and win free trips. easyJet • easyJet was the first airline to give users the opportunity to book their flight on Facebook. However, the booking process is then re-directed to the easyJet website. Delta • Since summer 2010 Delta passengers have been able to buy tickets on Delta's Facebook page using the “Book a Trip” tab. They can also let their Facebook friends know of their booking. In this case the whole reservation process is completed within Facebook. Airlines‟ Popularity on Facebook 2010 Airline Lufthansa Air France-KLM American Airlines Singapore Airlines Ryanair easyJet Qantas British Airways Delta Airlines Facebook “likes” 150,309 132,123 99,794 81,083 67,517 55,383 35,259 17,357 4,707 Source: Facebook, December 2010 Southwest • Southwest has three staff dedicated to monitoring and responding to queries made through social media channels. 23
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media and Travel Players © Euromonitor International Social media and travel retailers Travel retailers are typically using social media to communicate last minute deals and other offers, engage customers with their brands and receive their feedback. Some have also added Web 2.0 functionalities to their websites. Expedia Thomas Cook TUI Travel • Thomas Cook is present on Twitter, • TUI Travel appointed social media • • • Expedia Inc is the owner of TripAdvisor, the most influential website for the hotel sector. However, the company has not fully exploited this competitive advantage, allowing TripAdvisor’s users to book reviewed hotels not only through the Expedia, Hotels.com and Venere.com brands, but also through its main competitors in exchange for a commission. • • Facebook and YouTube. Thomas Cook uses Twitter to keep its followers up to date with news, offers, and website features. The official Thomas Cook Facebook site has 671 members – its airline on the other hand has 14,854 “likes”. The main incentive is to hear about offers and deals first. YouTube carries an official Thomas Cook YouTube channel containing holiday videos. The company encourages customers to rate and review their Thomas Cook holiday on thomascook.com. agency NixonMcInnes to create a social media strategy for its First Choice brand. • TUI hopes its social media activity, aimed primarily at families, will increase customer engagement and brand consideration. Booking.com • Specialist online travel agencies in hotel bookings such as Priceline/Booking.com, Hotels.com, Venere.com and HotelClub, all integrated in their websites a Web 2.0 functionality allowing their customers to leave a grade and review for the hotels where they stayed. 24
    • Social Media and Travel Players Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Case study: Florida’s response to BP oil spill disaster The disaster The response • The BP oil spill which took place on 20 April 2010 in the • Visit Florida decided to use social media of various kinds Gulf of Mexico was the largest accidental marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. • Florida has the longest coastline in the US (1,350 miles) and its economy is heavily influenced by tourism; one million jobs are linked to the industry. • Florida was in the global news for months as oil washed up on its beaches; oil leaked until July 2010. as part of its strategy to respond to the disaster. • On the basis of its crisis management plan, Visit Florida invited residents to share their recent photos of Florida’s locations on a new website page called Florida Live. • The site was populated by videos, photos and live Google map-based Twitter feeds. • Visit Florida released a 31-second video on YouTube encouraging visitors to check the Florida Live site for real-time updates on beach conditions. The challenge The outcome • The risk was that tourists would believe the worst and • According to Visit Florida figures, tourist arrivals to change their travel plans, or if they came, they would stay away from beach areas. • The global news coverage was focused on the worstaffected areas. This could inaccurately paint the whole of Florida with the same brush. • Hotels reported inquiries dropping off during May, and occupancy rates were 30% down on the year. • Florida needed to increase the information available to potential travellers so they could make travel decisions. Florida rose by 0.6% to 18.9 million in Q3 2010, in particular foreign tourist arrivals grew by over 17% driven by 23% growth in arrivals from Canada. • It is generally recognised by the industry that Visit Florida’s response through social media significantly helped mitigate the impact of the oil spill on tourism. • The idea to let Florida residents post photos, videos and comments on a website was especially effective due to travellers trusting more information posted by their peers than from a tourism promotion board or state authority. 25
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 26
    • A New Landscape for Travel Retail Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Traditional travel distribution model Consumers Supplier High street travel agents Before the internet revolution Prior to the internet, travel retail services were sold: 1. Directly by suppliers through call centres or in their offices/outlets; 2. Through high street travel agents which played the key role in travel distribution. 27
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media A New Landscape for Travel Retail © Euromonitor International New multi-channel model Supplier’s website Affiliate websites Search engines Social media Consumers Supplier Online travel agents High street travel agents After the internet revolution The advent of the internet marked a revolution in travel retail. Its main effects were: • Strong increase in direct sales through travel suppliers’ websites; • Key role played by online travel agents; • Gradual move by traditional travel retailers towards online sales; • Changing role for travel agents increasingly acting as travel consultants and/or specialising in niche products; • Important role for search engines to promote travel services; • Important role for specialist travel websites to promote travel services; • Increasing importance of social media to promote travel services as well as a customer service tool. 28
    • A New Landscape for Travel Retail Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Increase in independent travellers • Advent of the internet • Deregulation of air travel and LCCs growth • Adoption of internet by LCCs to save on travel agency costs • Growth of online travel agencies • Increase of independent travellers Independent travel growing for over a decade • Post-deregulation, the airline industry in Europe saw a rise in the size and quality of LCCs (low cost carriers). • LCCs were quick to adopt the internet as a method of booking, removing agency costs. • Agents were “disintermediated” from LCCs purchases, as more scheduled air travel purchases are made direct. • Online travel agencies grew at the expense of offline agencies. • A wide choice of tourism products can now be booked on the internet including hotels, flights, car rental, attractions, holiday packages etc. • The rise of independent travel drove a need for reviews and advice which is satisfied by social media. 29
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media A New Landscape for Travel Retail © Euromonitor International Independent travel: A more rewarding experience • Information gathering and choice is part of the holiday • Control over itinerary and activities Flexibility and control Feeling of involvement Risk Value for money • More risk – likely to involve travel agent • Not price alone, affordable indulgence Independent travel is inherently rewarding to many • Tourists like the control it gives them over their itinerary. • Being so involved in the fact-finding process gives traveller a sense that the holidays start earlier. • Although the vacation is typically based around low cost air travel, the tourist has the choice of spending more on a nice hotel, restaurant, activity etc, so the holiday is value for money, rather than cheap. • Travel agents step in where the itinerary becomes exceptionally complex, or where perceived risk is high (eg destinations where disease may be an issue). 30
    • A New Landscape for Travel Retail Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Continuous growth for online sales Steady growth for online sales • Online sales of travel products are especially significant in the air sector where they represented of total worldwide • • • • • • sales in 2010. The importance of online bookings is steadily growing also in the hotel sector where they will reach 20% of total worldwide sales by 2015. Online sales are less developed for other transportation where they accounted for 5% in 2010. Still room for the traditional channel Although its share is gradually declining, the traditional distribution channel is expected to continue to play an important role in the travel industry in the next five years. More expensive business and international travel will continue to be booked through non-internet channels. Online sales will be less significant in developing countries due to lower internet penetration. Global Online Sales as % of Total Sales by Category 1999-2015 50% 40% Car rental Air 30% Other transportation 20% Travel retail products Hotels 10% 0% 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 31
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 32
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Marketing © Euromonitor International How social media marketing works Company Global social media National social media Travel social media Target group Word of mouth Opinion leaders Online communities Press coverage Viral marketing • The promises of social media marketing are: 1. 2. To engage consumers with brands and products and get their feedback about them; To reach a selected target of consumers at minimum cost thanks to the multiplier effect generated by interaction among users. • The role of opinion leaders and word of mouth is key for social media marketing. • Social media marketing is different from search engine advertising which is based on a “click and buy” model. Brand awareness, engagement of users and building customer loyalty are more important for social media. • The maximum effect is reached when a campaign “goes viral”. 33
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Marketing © Euromonitor International Social media as marketing tools • As a contribution to this global briefing, Amadeus sees social media and social interaction driving some key trends. “Real time” brands The anticipatory brand that is always in 2-way conversations with customers and partners is more likely to succeed Social marketplace Brands will take more advantage of the virtual marketplace by creating products and services that have a social disposition Customers as an asset Money, time and skills will be lavished on monitoring customers before, during and after their travel experiences and identifying points where expectations are met or are not Customer loyalty Social media will allow companies to move from engaging members to communities, with new currencies of recognition and relationship status with individuals Tailored services Operators will be able to proactively target customers’ desires from extreme sports to the snacks they find in the hotel fridge on arrival Source: Amadeus 34
    • Social Media Marketing Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Which type: global, national or specialist? A global success • Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and other global social media are gaining ground worldwide and rank among the most visited websites of many countries. • According to Nielsen in 2010, Facebook was one of the two most visited websites in the US, the UK, France, Italy and Spain. • YouTube was one of the seven most visited websites in the US, the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain. National networking significant • Local social networking sites generate more traffic than global ones in Brazil, China, Japan, the Netherlands and • • • • • • Russia. Asia Pacific’s biggest economies have successfully developed local sites such as Mixi (Japan), Qzone, 51.com and RenRen (China), Cyworld (South Korea) and Friendster (Asia Pacific). Of the top 10 social networking sites, the Brazilian Orkut.com is the largest regional player. The Russian sites Vkontakte.ru and Odnoklassriki.ru and the Dutch site Hyves are also significant. Important national social networks exist also in France (Skyrock and Viadeo) and Spain (Tuenti). Target with specialist sites For travel services, specific travel-related social media sites also play a very important role as they allow advertisers to reach an even more targeted audience, which is key for advertisers. In Italy, Turistipercaso.it, a specialist travel social media site where users share their travel stories and tips, is a favourite choice for travel and tourism advertisers. 35
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Marketing © Euromonitor International Case study: Facebook Key facts • The company was founded in February 2004, but was not available to non-college students until autumn 2006. • Facebook employs more than 2,000 people and has offices in the US, Europe, Australia, Japan and Canada. • It is also possible to create different adverts which Advertising on Facebook will be seen by different target groups. • It is possible to advertise a brand or product, but also advertising. the company Facebook page created to engage • Within its user base of almost 600 million people, advertisers customers, receive their feedback, gain their loyalty can target the consumer segment they are interested in, and get them to share it with friends. selecting it on the basis of several criteria including location, age, interests, sex, language, relationship status, education • Facebook offers the possibility to create an online community of users around advertisers’ offers and etc. products. Facebook Users by Country October 2010 • Facebook’s ability to generate profits is often debated. Advertising on Facebook can be useful and Rank Country Unique users, „000 % of total effective for travel and tourism companies. However, they need to be aware that their investment will not 1 US 130,000 22.0 translate into a rise in sales in the short term, but 2 UK 28,000 4.7 rather in the possibility to engage customers with 3 Italy 25,000 4.2 their brands and gain their loyalty in the medium and long term. 4 France 23,000 3.9 • Facebook is considered a key player in social media 5 Germany 21,000 3.6 Others 363,000 61.5 TOTAL 590,000 100.0 Source: Doubleclick by Google Social plugins • Companies can make their websites more social adding Facebook social plugins to them such as the Like button, the Login button, the Comments plugin and the Activity Feed. 36
    • Social Media Marketing Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Viral marketing What is it? • Viral marketing describes the deliberate use of social media to distribute content quickly, cheaply and effectively. • Viral marketing mimics the way “word of mouth” advertising works; users actively recommend the content to their closest friends, who then pass it on. • However, it is not the same as word of mouth, which decays over time, while viral marketing broadcasts and therefore compounds the message. • Successful viral marketing can lead to an explosion in awareness. If one person passes it to two friends, who then look at the material and pass it on, and so on, awareness of the content will be exponential. Company But... • Deliberately creating content of sufficient appeal that others will want to recommend it to their friends is difficult. Many viral campaigns use humour or heavy promotion to achieve recommendations; this can sometimes miss the underlying point of the campaign. • Campaigns can misfire. The nature of viral marketing is that once it starts, the originators of the material are no longer in control. The promotion may even prompt an active recommendation against the product or service. • Forecasting success or popularity can be difficult. Oversubscription to a promotion can lead to disappointment, high costs or both. Tips for a successful viral campaign 1. It is in the right place at the right time to find an audience that shares its values. 2. It must be quickly and easily digested and inspire an instinctive “wow, I like it” reaction. 3. It is easily shared, copied or linked to, and sending it on must be somehow rewarding. 4. Videos, pictures and jokes circulate quickest, hence the popularity of YouTube to share viral content. 37
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Marketing © Euromonitor International Case study: YouTube Your video on the web Advertising on YouTube • Founded in February 2005, YouTube is the world's most • YouTube offers advertisers a way to promote their popular online video community. • YouTube allows people to easily upload and share video clips on its site and across the internet through websites, mobile devices, blogs and email. • YouTube has numerous partnership deals with content providers such as CBS, BBC, Universal Music Group, Sony Music Group, Warner Music Group, NBA, The Sundance Channel, among others. • YouTube was acquired by Google in November 2006. YouTube Users by Country October 2010 • • • Unique users, „000 % of total US 97,000 19.8 2 Japan 38,000 7.8 3 Germany 23,000 4.7 4 Brazil 21,000 4.3 5 UK 19,000 3.9 Others 292,000 59.6 TOTAL 490,000 100.0 Rank Country 1 • • content to the YouTube community as well as to associate themselves with content being watched by their target audience. YouTube offers analytic tools to help advertisers understand their audience and derive general business intelligence and a number of charged-for services. Promoted videos allow advertisers to promote their videos among their consumer target through an auction-based marketplace. Display and linear adverts include traditional branded display, linear adverts, and video overlay adverts. Brand channels give companies the possibility to create a specific channel personalised with their look and feel where customers can be informed about new products and activities and leave their feedback. They are aimed at creating relationships with customers and at strengthening customer loyalty. Engagement programmes and contests consist of sponsored video-based thematic experiences able to engage the company target market. Source: Doubleclick by Google data 38
    • Social Media Marketing Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Social media tracking How to demonstrate success? Search engines vs social media • Warning: there is no easy way to effectively track social • Return on investment for advertising spending on media success, despite the use of social media tracking tools. • Proving return on investment (ROI) via social media is not as easy as demonstrating it when using online search engine advertising. • The reason for this is that while search engine and other online advertising aims at a sale, social media advertising is more focused on brand awareness and customer service. search engines is very easy to measure thanks to effective tracking tools such as Google Analytics. • On the other hand, in spite of the existence of several monitoring tools such as the ones listed in the following slide, measuring the impact of social media advertising is difficult due to the impossibility to identify the impact of the different factors, and evaluation is often of a rather qualitative nature. • Investments in both these channels will be increasingly included in marketing plans serving different aims: increasing short-term sales in the case of search engine advertising; and strengthening brand awareness and customer loyalty in the case of social media marketing. An extension of public relations (PR)? • In many ways social media marketing is an extension of public relations, as much as it is a new form of advertising. Part of the value of a social media impression is in being talked about, including on TV, radio and in traditional press. • In a study with Facebook, Nielsen calls this effect “earned media” (Advertising Effectiveness: Nielsen 2010). • Social media advertising uses some PR-influenced methodologies for determining value for money. 39
    • Social Media Marketing Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Monitoring tools SM Monitoring Tool Clients in Tourism, Hospitality and Travel Asomo (Socialware) Wyndham Hotels, Ramada, Days Inn, Hawthorn, Wingate, Travelodge, Knights Inn, Macrotel, Canary Islands Tourism Department, Air France-KLM, and others. Clarabridge Social Media Analysis (Clarabridge) Choice Hotels, Marriott International, Expedia, Gaylord Hotels, United Airlines, and others. CharterGuard Social Media Monitoring (Lodging Interactive) Claremont Resort, Boston Harbour Hotel, Hershey Hotel, and others. Converseon Tools/Conversation Miner (Converseon) Hilton Hotels, and others. Review Analyst (Standing Dog Interactive) Aimbridge Hospitality, Omni Hotels, Rydges Hotels & Resorts, Crescent Hotels and Resorts, Starwood Hotels and Resorts, Hostmark Hospitality Group (HHG), LodgeWorks, Prism Hotels, Hotel Wales, Belmont Hotel, and others. Revinate (Revinate) Trump Hotel, Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, Kimpton Hotels, InterContinental, Andaz Hotels, White Lodging, Peabody, Roosevelt Hotel, Hilton Hotels (Austin, Las Vegas), Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants, Reidenbach, and others. SIM Score - Social Influence Marketing Score (Razorfish) Carnival Cruise Lines, Starwood Hotels, and others. Source: Ideya Business and Marketing Consultancy, Social Media Monitoring Tools and Services Report 40
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 41
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Go Mobile © Euromonitor International Social media and smartphones • The uptake of smartphones and tablets to access the internet created new opportunities for social media to offer new • • • • functionalities based on the location of the user, thanks to geolocalisation services. This allowed the development of location-based mobile social media such as Gowalla and Foursquare. Traditional social media also created new functionalities based on location such as Facebook Places. Mobile social media applications are opening up the market among small companies to online advertising. Smartphone penetration is growing rapidly; they are expected to account for 92% of mobile phones in Europe by 2014. Use of Smartphones to Access Social Media by % of Owners 2010 30 % of owners 25 24 23 22 20 22 US Japan 18 15 13 10 5 0 UK France Germany Italy Source: Ofcom International Communications Market Report 42
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Go Mobile © Euromonitor International Demographic segmentation • Using social media via mobile phone is still a minority activity but is more prevalent among younger age groups. • 45% of 18-24 year-olds in the UK used their mobile phones for social networking, a similar proportion to France. • In the US, the percentage of under 25s was less than the UK, France and Japan (at 37%) but the practice was more evenly spread. 37% of 25-34 year-olds also participated, more than any other country with the exception of the UK. Use of Smartphones to Access Social Media by Age by % of Owners 2010 50 45 % owners 40 43 38 39 37 37 31 30 27 26 25 23 21 18 20 10 10 16 16 10 8 16 11 9 5 4 3 21 5 3 4 2 1 0 UK France Germany 18-24 25-34 35-44 Italy 45-54 US Japan 55-64 Source: Ofcom International Communications Market Report 43
    • Social Media Go Mobile Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Geolocalisation • Geolocalisation is the identification of the real-world geographic location of the traveller. • The focus is on where the traveller is, and what services are available locally. • Geolocalisation is available through GPS technology. • An interesting application in travel and tourism is for example the possibility for travellers to scan the immediate area to find available hotel rooms and book them. Issues Opportunities • • • • Find offers based on location Maintain relationships when on the move Capture the “impulse buy” Use “augmented reality” functions • Privacy • Personal safety • Lack of technological ubiquity (eg between developed and developing countries) • Relevance of marketing offers 44
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Social Media Go Mobile © Euromonitor International Mobile social media applications Foursquare Gowalla • Foursquare is a mobile application • Gowalla is a location-based service • • • • Facebook Places • Facebook Places is a mobile that makes cities easier to use and to help users keep up with their application which allows Facebook more interesting to explore. friends, share their favourite places, users to let their friends know their and discover the world around them. current location, to get in touch with It is a friend-finder, a social city friends who are in their same guide and a game that challenges • Users can connect with friends via users to experience new things, and iPhone, Android, Blackberry or Palm location and to know about offers in rewards them for doing so. smartphones, as well as on the web. commercial activities based in that location. Foursquare lets users "check in" to • Based in Austin, Texas, Gowalla was a place when they are there, tell launched in 2009 by Josh Williams • When Facebook users “check in” a location this is shown on their “Wall”, friends where they are and track the and Scott Raymond and is backed in their friends’ News Feeds and history of where they have been and by investors including Greylock also in the location (bar, cinema, who they have been there with. Partners, Alsop Louie Partners and etc) Facebook page. Founders Fund. As of October 2010, Foursquare had • Facebook users can also tag people over four million users worldwide. who are with them. Foursquare offers considerable potential for travellers as it allows them to obtain useful tips from locals via their smartphones. Mobility and social interaction at an intersection Thanks to smartphones and tablets like the iPad, social network services and platforms [...] the concepts of mobility and social interaction are at an intersection, no business can afford to dismiss a social strategy as a "nice to have". Amadeus 45
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Introduction The Rise of Social Media Social Media and Travellers Social Media and Travel Players A New Landscape for Travel Retail Social Media Marketing Social Media Go Mobile Opportunities and Future Outlook 46
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Opportunities and Future Outlook © Euromonitor International SWOT analysis Truly global Real-time dialogue Credibility gap • The use of social media is • Social media appear very • Travel is about the now truly global. suitable for use through smartphones and tablets, • Brazil, Russia, China and accompanying people the Netherlands all have wherever they are. local sites more popular than Facebook. • This will increase their importance as sales of • Where there is broadband, these devices rise. there are social media. • Social media will continue to grow with internet adoption. Strengths Opportunities Investment tracking • To measure return on destination (and people investment on social who have been there) not media is very difficult. you and your friends. • Typically social media • User-generated content activities translate into on generalist social media brand awareness, can appear less credible, customer engagement while this is not an issue and customer loyalty on specialist social media. rather than into short-term sales. • In this respect, search Weaknesses engine advertising is superior. Threats Social media on the go Geolocalisation Authenticity of content • Social media give • A focus on where • Lack of checks on reviews • Complaints can go viral as companies the opportunity of entering into a conversation with consumers, get their feedback in real time, adjust their offer to meet consumer preferences. • They are the ultimate frontier of marketing. travellers are, and who they are, can allow destinations and local amenities to promote themselves at the last minute and in real time. Lack of control may let competitors easily as promotions and sabotage supplier ratings. “good news” stories • Some customers may use • Social media need active their ability to give a management and prompt review to blackmail travel response to negative service providers in order feedback. to get discounts. 47
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Opportunities and Future Outlook © Euromonitor International Opportunities for travel players Tourism boards Hotels Airlines Travel retailers Social media Brand awareness Promotion Real- time sales Loyalty Customer service Crisis management Last- minute sales The success of social media is opening up many new opportunities travel players cannot afford to miss: • Promote brands and destinations in an immediate and informal way; • Engage customers and gain their loyalty; • Act on bad feedback to improve service; • Manage emergency crises; • Promote deals and new products; • Promote last-minute and real-time sales. 48
    • Opportunities and Future Outlook Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Opportunities by category Tourism boards Hotels • Social media create a buzz: • Twitter: • Build a community around an interest in the • Can help customer service; destination; • The community can include comments from frequent travellers to the destination to help promote it. • Manage a crisis: • Social media can be used to manage “downs”, as well as “ups”; evinced in the Florida case study; • Provision of real-time information by inhabitants can contribute positively to offset the focus of mainstream media on “bad news” stories. rooms at the last minute. • Facebook and YouTube: • Can help build a brand and engage customers with it. • TripAdvisor: • Hotels should monitor reviews and act promptly to correct highlighted issues and communicate well. Airlines Travel retailers • Twitter: • Can help customer service by answering customers’ questions in real time; • Can help fill airline seats at the last minute. • Facebook and YouTube: • Can help build a community around the airline brand; • Can help build a market for an airline’s destination. • Social media can also help push last-minute ancillary revenue. • Can help market distressed inventory, eg fill hotel • Travel retailers need to become better users of social media tools than anyone else in the marketplace as this will help them maintain a place in the overall travel value chain. • Social media will be key to building brand reputation, engaging customers and gaining their loyalty. • Focus will need to be on the company competence, on its destinations, and on quality of service. • Social media will also be useful to advertise new products and current deals/promotions. 49
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media Opportunities and Future Outlook © Euromonitor International Future outlook: a more systematic approach Company Planning Global social media Communication National social media Monitor Specialist social media Response Corporate social media Users • Social media importance within marketing strategies is expected to grow significantly over 2010-2015 thanks in part to their rising penetration in developing countries. • The arena will also become increasingly segmented, with growth in international generalist sites as well as national, local, community, corporate and specialist social media. • Platforms will increase, including growth in access via smartphones, tablets and possibly televisions. • Companies will need to employ a more systematic approach, carefully planning their presence on social media, monitoring them, responding swiftly when needed and exploiting their potential. 50
    • Opportunities and Future Outlook Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Future outlook: steady expansion ahead Increasing worldwide penetration More websites will get social • Use of social media in travel will inevitably grow: • The growth of social media will also translate into more countries. The internet channel will increasingly penetrate air, hotel and car rental sales (between 10% and 40% in 2010). • National and local social media are expected to grow: • Russia and Brazil are good examples of how language and custom play an important role for national social media. websites adopting social media elements and functionalities. • Many companies already allow customers to leave comments on their websites; this will increasingly be the case in the future as consumers will increasingly expect to read unbiased opinion before making a purchase. • Social media functionalities will also play an increasing role for search engines; Google Places already includes consumer feedback on local commercial activities and uses TripAdvisor reviews. Facebook vs TripAdvisor Planning will be critical • TripAdvisor and other specialist travel sites are never • The increasing importance of social media in every day likely to match Facebook in terms of membership. • Facebook, on the other hand, is never likely to be as credible and reputable as the travel specialists, in influencing the final choice of travel provider. • The two will continue to be tools that do different things for very good reasons. Travel suppliers (eg hotels and airlines) will need to be present in both: in specialist social media where travellers look for information and advice; and in generalist social networks where people share their opinions and preferences with friends. life all over the world, as well as their growing complexity and segmentation, will make it necessary for companies to take a much more systematic approach in future. • It will therefore be increasingly important for companies to plan carefully all different steps of their social media presence and activities. • Planning, tracking and responding quickly will be key skills required by future social media marketers. • Broadband penetration will continue in developing 51
    • Report Definitions Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Definitions Web 2.0 • A term used for the first time in 2004, Web 2.0 refers to the second generation of the World Wide Web. Web 2.0 is short-hand for the movement away from PC applications and static web pages to online social networking and dynamic user-created content. • However, Web 2.0 is not only a description of a set of technologies. It also encompasses a number of behavioural trends: collaboration; self-publishing; the creation and uploading of audio and video files; and the sharing of photos and information. Web 2.0 functionalities permit one-to-many communications, in addition to peer-to-peer. Examples of travel websites with Web 2.0 functionalities are Booking.com, “Lufthansa We Fly” and “Nothing like Australia” websites which allow travellers to leave feedback about their trip. Social Media • Social media are websites allowing users some form of interaction. They include social networking sites but also websites with Web 2.0 functionalities, which are not based on people being part of a network and owning individual profiles. For example, YouTube and Flickr are social media which act as repositories for content which can then be shared. Social media also include forums, message boards, podcasts, social bookmarking and social news sites. Social Networking Sites • Social networking sites permit networks of people to generate a dialogue and share content online. Social network services typically include a profile for each user and a range of possibility to interact with friends and other members of the network. Examples of social networks include Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn, Orkut, Wayn, Hyves, Friendster and Mixi. Viral Marketing • Viral marketing is the deliberate use of social media to distribute a message, video or other internet content via personal recommendation. This can take place via email, Facebook “likes”, YouTube “share” etc. “Going viral” describes the cascading and compounding effect of a successful viral marketing campaign resulting in an exponential growth of awareness about the object of the campaign. 52
    • Travel and Tourism: Social Media © Euromonitor International Experience more... This research from Euromonitor International is part of a global strategic intelligence system which offers a complete picture of the commercial environment . Also available from Euromonitor International: Global Briefings Global Company Profiles Country Market Insight Reports The state of the market globally and regionally, emerging trends and pressing industry issues: timely, relevant insight published every month. The competitive positioning and strategic direction of the leading companies including uniquely sector-specific sales and share data. The key drivers influencing the industry in each country; comprehensive coverage of supply-side and demand trends and how they shape the future outlook. Interactive Statistical Database Strategy Briefings Learn More Market sizes, market shares, distribution channels and forecasts; the complete market analysed at levels of category detail beyond any other source. Executive debate on the global trends changing the consumer markets of the future. To find out more about Euromonitor International's complete range of business intelligence on industries, countries and consumers please visit www.euromonitor.com or contact your local Euromonitor International office: London + 44 (0)20 7251 8024 Chicago +1 312 922 1115 Singapore +65 6429 0590 Shanghai +86 21 63726288 Vilnius +370 5 243 1577 Cape Town + 27 21 552 0037 Dubai +971 4 372 4363 53