Cause+marketing tumbleseed

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Cause+marketing tumbleseed

  1. 1. CAUSEMARKETINGHow to MaximizeYour ConnectionsIn the Community
  2. 2. AUTHOR PAGE:Tammy Alexy& Janelle Hite Tammy Alexy and Janelle Hite are co-founders of Tumbleseed, an online volunteer community bringing together non-profits, volunteers and businesses to foster good works across local communities. Connect with us: info@tumbleseed.org www.tumbleseed.org
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS:CHAPTER 1:What is Cause Marketing………………………….…….….4What Consumer’s Say …………….…………………………5CHAPTER 2:Cause Marketing Programs ……………………………….6Point of Sale Programs …………….………………………7Promotion …………….………………………………………..8Events …………….…………………………………………..…9Fundraisers …………………………………………………..10Employee Engagement ……………..……………………11Digital …………….…………………………....................12CHAPTER 3:Creating Your Plan …………….…………………………..13Identify Your Cause …………….………………………….14Align with a Non-Profit…………….……………………….16Develop a Program…………….……………………………18Maximize Your Exposure…………….……………………..20
  4. 4. CHAPTER 1: What is Cause Marketing? Cause Marketing is a PR and marketing strategy that leverages a partnership between a for-profit business and a non-profit organization. The goal is mutually beneficial -- a non-profit gains resources to continue their mission and the business gains exposure for their efforts. Whether you are a large national company or a small local business, cause marketing is a highly effective way to give back , gain exposure for your good works, and grow your customer and community relationships.// Page 4
  5. 5. CAUSE MARKETING According to the Cone Evolution Study conducted in 2010, consumer attitudes toward cause marketing are 90% highly favorable. • 90% of consumers want companies to tell them the ways they are supporting causes. 85% • 85% of consumers have a more positive image of a product or company when it supports a cause they care about. • 87% of consumers said they 87% would switch from one brand/business to another if it were associated with a good cause.// Page 5
  6. 6. CHAPTER 2: Cause Marketing Programs DIGITAL We know that supporting a cause helps the surrounding community. Based on consumer feedback, we also know that partnering with a cause as part of a marketing program is widely accepted by consumers and even looked upon favorably. It makes good social sense and also makes good business sense. Cause marketing can take on many shapes and forms referred to as cause marketing programs. Next, we will take a look at various types of programs and point out best practices.// Page 6
  7. 7. CAUSE MARKETING COURTESY OF THE RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE A Point-of-Sale program is a simple method of incorporating a cause into your sales process. If you have a business to consumer model, it’s simply a matter of placing a coin box or asking consumers if they would like to donate to a cause. Coin canisters, pinups, electronic donations are all forms of the point-of-sale program. McDonalds uses a coin canister at their register to collect funds for the Ronald McDonald House, a program that supports critically ill children and families. Best Practice Tip: Extend your brand and legacy as part of your cause marketing program.// Page 7
  8. 8. CAUSE MARKETING COURTESY OF THE GENTLE DENTISTWhen a business leverages a Promotion as part of theircause marketing program, proceeds are donated to apartnering charity as part of the program. For example,The Gentle Dentist partners with the Smiles for Lifeprogram offering customers half off on their teethwhitening service. Local advertising, video, and webmarketing get the word out about the promotion andcause. Proceeds from the sales are then donated tocharities that support children’s smiles, including a localcharity that supports children in need of smiles.Best Practice Tip: Align your cause and promotion withyour company’s values, so as not to confuse customers.// Page 8
  9. 9. CAUSE MARKETING Local Events tying in a cause that your audience identifies with will help build awareness and community relations. E&A Credit Union , in this example, is hosting an event that caters to their audience, women in the local community. The timing also ties in nicely with Breast Cancer Awareness month, a cause that is important to most women. COURTESY OF E&A CREDIT UNION Best Practice Tip: Align your events with a cause that matters to your audience.// Page 9
  10. 10. CAUSE MARKETING COURTESY OF WWJ 950The purpose of a Fundraiser is to bring attention to acause and raise funds to support the mission. In thisexample, WWJ extends their platform and resources to hosttheir Radiothon for THAW (The Heat and Warmth Fund).Employees, local companies and people in the communitycome together to man the phones and support the localmission, helping to raise funds to keep the heat on duringthe winter months for local families impacted by economicalchallenges.Best Practice Tip: Involve your employees, customersand the community in a way that extends your resourcesand ignites a passion around a cause -- one that people inthe community can rally around.// Page 10
  11. 11. CAUSE MARKETING Many companies are beginning to recognize the importance of Employee Engagement through their volunteering and giving back programs. When companies encourage their employees to engage in the community, they foster team building, company loyalty and a positive culture. Kohl’sCares has set up their Associates in Action program in which employees earn grant monies toward a participating non-profit COURTESY OF KOHL’SCARES when they volunteer together. Best Practice Tip: Create a program that engages your employees and fosters team building.// Page 11
  12. 12. CAUSE MARKETING COURTESY OF RIDGECONDigital programs, web and social media, provide a platformthat helps good stories go viral.Each year Ridgecon’s No Roof Left Behind launches theirdigital program in the form of a contest, where a free roof is aawarded to a local family in need. Stories and nominationsare submitted through the company’s website. The companythen asks the community to vote online for the mostdeserving story. A winner is announced based on the numberof votes and a day is set to replace the roof. A celebrationfollows, a block party where the community and media areinvited to share in the celebration.Best Practice Tip: Create stories worth sharing and sharethem.// Page 12
  13. 13. CHAPTER 3: Cause Marketing Plan One of the key benefits of cause marketing is that it gives your business a new story to tell customers, prospects and the press. Yet, how do you find the time to get involved in a cause and on what scale? Where do you begin? The next few pages will help guide you through the process on how to create your cause marketing plan – a plan that will help you maximize your connections in the community.// Page 13
  14. 14. CAUSE MARKETING First, determine your mission. What are you passionate about? What interests you? Think back to your past experiences that really caused an emotion whether it was positive or negative. Were you so upset that you couldn’t see straight when you saw pollution in the river? Did your heart break when you read about the number of homeless students in your community? Did your eyes light up when you saw the reaction of a local family in need who just had a house built? Determining what you are passionate about can narrow the field of where you want to give back.// Page 14
  15. 15. CAUSE MARKETING Don’t spread yourself too thin.” Recent conversations with a non-profit provided some good advice, “Don’ t spread yourself too thin.” When businesses divide their resources across several organizations, they will not necessarily see the impact on their charitable giving. Instead of giving a little here and little there, you can concentrate your efforts on one or two causes near and dear to you. You won’t end up spreading yourself too thin. You will now be able to see the impact of your giving. So, the next time someone comes walking into your place of business, have a focus. When the cause does not align with your mission, you can respond by saying “Your organization sounds like a wonderful organization; however, I am currently focused on raising funds (fill in the blank).” They will clearly understand their need does not meet your goals or mission.// Page 15
  16. 16. CAUSE MARKETING Find a non-profit that fits. Take time to find a non-profit that aligns with your goals, mission, and passion. Perhaps you are an outdoor retailer and would like to do something that helps the environment. Maybe you are a local restaurant that wants to help a food pantry. Or possibly you are a heating and cooling business that wants to get involved in THAW. Go visit them. Interview them. Make sure there is a connection. Tour their facility. You want them to appreciate you as much as you appreciate them. Remember, it’s a partnership. It needs to work for the both of you.// Page 16
  17. 17. CAUSE MARKETING COURTESY OF TUMBLESEED (WWW.TUMBLESEED .ORG There are lots of causes and non profits right in your own backyard that are doing important work. They need your help. Tumbleseed, www.tumbleseed.org, is a good place to start your search. You can browse for opportunities to serve or partner. You may even want to join the community and add your own community initiatives and cause related marketing programs.// Page 17
  18. 18. CAUSE MARKETING Determine how you will get involved. What type of program are you interested in? A fundraiser? Maybe you would like to give a donation and create an event around it. Or if you have a consumer based business, you could create a point- of-sale program. For example, if your goal is to help homeless students, partner with your local family services and offer to collect backpacks at your location.// Page 18
  19. 19. CAUSE MARKETING Another way to get involved is to engage your employees. Encourage team building or even some healthy competition between teams of employees to raise funds for a cause. Perhaps you have a flair for teaching and would be interested in tutoring. If you are a new business that wants to encourage new customers by offering a discount on your service, offer a promotion that includes donations to a local cause. Hungry Howies just started a pink box campaign. Their pizza boxes are now in pink for October donating one dollar for every pizza ordered to Breast Cancer Research. There are many ways that you can get involved. For more ideas, browse Tumbleseed’s online volunteer community at www.tumbleseed.org and look at the types of initiatives that are taking place in your local community.// Page 19
  20. 20. CAUSE MARKETING Find places to maximize your exposure. What vehicles are you going to use? Remember, 90% of consumers want companies to tell them how they are supporting causes. How are you going to let your community and potential new customers know how you are giving back?// Page 20
  21. 21. CAUSE MARKETING Do you currently advertise? Are you doing it in a way that builds your connections and even better, relationships in the local community? Advertising is about visibility and promotion. Cause marketing increases your favorability. Cause marketing gives you a new story to tell. People love to hear a great story. Send a quick note or call the local media stations and news sources. This is an excellent vehicle to get your story out. Do you have a website? If not, you can use social media . Join Tumbleseed’s (www.tumbleseed.org) online volunteer community to post your initiatives. Tumbleseed’s social media platform shares your initiatives with Twitter, Facebook and Google. Let’s face it. The Internet drives every aspect of our lives. Nine times out of ten, people use the Internet to find out information. We live in the information age. We share more content from more sources with more people more often and more quickly.// Page 21
  22. 22. CAUSE MARKETING According to a New York Times study, The Psychology of 84% share Sharing (2011), Brian Brett, (The New Times Managing because it is a Director of Customer Research) 84% share because it is a way way to support to support causes or issues they care about. causes or issues they care about. You want to extend your Source: New York Times, Psychology exposure so you are reaching of Sharing 2011 people in ways they can share. Social media provides you with tools that help you to broaden your audience and get the word out. Marketing in the 21st century should involve a digital program. Consumers expect it. Using websites and social media sites to complement your traditional methods of advertising is efficient and economical.// Page 22
  23. 23. CAUSE MARKETING In Summary…  Cause marketing builds loyalty and trust over time.  Get started with a cohesive plan : (1) Determine your interests, (2) Partner with a non profit or organization that aligns with your interests, (3) Identify a program that works for you, (4) Maximize your exposure.  Be authentic and transparent.  Maximize your connections and build relations in the community you do business in.  Leave a meaningful legacy.// Page 22
  24. 24. Thank you! (and feel free to share)Tumbleseed is a Michigan basednonprofit and online volunteercommunity bringing together nonprofits, volunteers and businessesto foster good works across localcommunities in Michigan. You cancheck out our community atwww.tumbleseed.org.

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