Gathering performance information overview

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gathering performance information overview is all about appraisal forms.

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Gathering performance information overview

  1. 1.  Appraisal Forms  Characteristics of Appraisal Forms  Determining Overall Rating  Appraisal Period and Number of Meetings  Who Should Provide Performance Information?  A Model of Rater Motivation  Preventing Rating Distortion through Rater Training Programs Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  2. 2.  Basic Employee Information  Accountabilities, Objectives, and Standards  Competencies and Indicators  Major Achievements and Contributions  Stakeholder Input  Employee Comments  Signatures Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  3. 3.  Developmental Achievements  Developmental  Needs  Plans  Goals Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  4. 4.  Simplicity  Relevancy  Descriptiveness  Adaptability  Comprehensiveness  Definitional Clarity  Communication  Time Orientation Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  5. 5. Judgmental strategy Mechanical strategy Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  6. 6. Number of Meetings • Annual • Semi-annual • Quarterly Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  7. 7.  Anniversary date  Supervisor doesn’t have to fill out forms at same time  Can’t tie rewards to fiscal year  Fiscal year  Rewards tied to fiscal year  Goals tied to corporate goals  May be burden to supervisor, depending on implementation Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  8. 8.  System Inauguration  Self-Appraisal  Classical Performance Review  Merit/Salary Review  Development Plan  Objective Setting Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  9. 9. Employees should be involved in selecting  Which sources evaluate  Which performance dimensions When employees are actively involved  Higher acceptance of results  Perception that system is fair Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  10. 10. Direct knowledge of employee performance  Supervisors  Peers  Subordinates  Self  Customers Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  11. 11.  Advantages  Best position to evaluate performance vs. strategic goals  Make decisions about rewards  Disadvantages  Supervisor may not be able to directly observe performance  Evaluations may be biased Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  12. 12.  Advantages  Assess teamwork  Disadvantages  Possible friendship bias  May be less discriminating Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  13. 13.  Advantages  Accurate when used for developmental purposes  Good position to assess some competencies  Disadvantages  Inflated when used for administrative purposes  May fear retaliation (confidentiality is key) Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  14. 14.  Advantages  Increased acceptance of decisions  Decreased defensiveness during appraisal interview  Good position to track activities during review period  Disadvantages  May be more lenient and biased Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  15. 15.  Advantages  Employees become more focused on meeting customer expectations  Disadvantages  Time  Money Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  16. 16.  Expect disagreement  Ensure employee receives feedback by source  Assign differential weights to scores by source, depending on importance Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  17. 17.  Intentional errors  Rating inflation  Rating deflation  Unintentional errors  Due to complexity of task Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  18. 18. Expected Positive and Negative Consequences of Rating Accuracy Probability of Experiencing Positive & Negative Consequences Expected Positive and Negative Consequences of Rating Distortion Probability of Experiencing Positive & Negative Consequences Motivation to Provide Accurate Ratings Motivation to Distort Ratings Rating Behavior
  19. 19.  Maximize merit raise/rewards  Encourage employees  Avoid creating written record  Avoid confrontation with employees  Promote undesired employees out of unit  Make manager look good to his/her supervisor Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  20. 20.  Shock employees  Teach a lesson  Send a message to employee  Build a written record of poor performance Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  21. 21. Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  22. 22.  Information  Motivation  Identifying, observing, recording and evaluating performance  How to interact with employees when they receive performance information Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  23. 23.  Reasons for implementing the performance management system  Information on the appraisal form and system mechanics Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  24. 24. • Benefits of providing accurate ratings • Tools for providing accurate ratings Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  25. 25.  How to identify and rank job activities  How to observe, record, measure performance  How to minimize rating errors Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006
  26. 26.  How to conduct an appraisal interview  How to train, counsel, and coach Prentice Hall, Inc. © 2006

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