Female leadership in selected co-ops in BC Cheryl L Cheryl Lans  & Delia Becker British Columbia Institute for Cooperative...
Introduction <ul><li>There is a claim that the leadership qualities needed in the new millennium are uniquely ‘female’, re...
Have Women Made it to the Top?   <ul><li>Financial Post 500 companies (FP500) </li></ul><ul><li>13 FP500 Heads </li></ul><...
Leadership in co-ops vs.  in corporations <ul><li>89.2% of Fortune 500 companies in the US have at least one female board ...
CCA Survey, 2001 (cont.) <ul><li>25% of co-ops have no women on their boards. </li></ul><ul><li>Co-ops in Alberta have 53....
Men’s and Women’s Leadership Styles <ul><li>Leadership: The ability to influence a group toward the achievement of goals. ...
Outline <ul><li>This presentation will give an overview of the research being conducted on female leadership. </li></ul><u...
Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Females dominate in the early stages of co-op development but are replaced by men once the co-...
Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Female leaders do not always get support from other women if they take certain positions or ap...
Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Women have spend more time to back up all their ideas and decisions with hard facts whereas me...
Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Female leaders cannot show emotion and have to struggle to maintain their credibility. </li></...
Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Women who were nominated to the Board by a female leader performed all the typically female ro...
Conclusion <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Start-up manuals should go beyond the technical information and inclu...
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Female Leadership co-ops Delia B

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Female Leadership co-ops Delia B

  1. 1. Female leadership in selected co-ops in BC Cheryl L Cheryl Lans & Delia Becker British Columbia Institute for Cooperative Studies (BCICS) British Columbia Maritime Resource Co-op
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>There is a claim that the leadership qualities needed in the new millennium are uniquely ‘female’, requiring intuition and creativity. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders are now seen as those who know there is a need for change and can inspire and motivate others to pursue worthy goals and achieve personal fulfillment through cooperative endeavors. </li></ul><ul><li>Women leaders can bring different problem solving skills to the workplace and therefore could enhance the prospects of co-operatives, diversify activities, fortify the movement and have perspectives on power that could improve co-operative governance. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Have Women Made it to the Top? <ul><li>Financial Post 500 companies (FP500) </li></ul><ul><li>13 FP500 Heads </li></ul><ul><li>3.9% FP500 top earners </li></ul><ul><li>6.7% FP500 highest titles </li></ul><ul><li>11.2% FP500 board directors </li></ul><ul><li>14.0% FP500 corporate officers </li></ul><ul><li>33.7% Management occupations </li></ul><ul><li>46.1% Canadian labour force </li></ul><ul><li>Source: 2003 Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of Canada </li></ul>
  4. 4. Leadership in co-ops vs. in corporations <ul><li>89.2% of Fortune 500 companies in the US have at least one female board member. In Canada half (51.4%) of the top 500 companies have no women board members. </li></ul><ul><li>68% of Canada's largest co-ops have at least one female board member. </li></ul><ul><li>Co-ops in Ontario have 62% of boards with 50% or more women. </li></ul><ul><li>Small and medium-sized co-ops (78% have at least one woman) </li></ul><ul><li>Housing co-ops (65% have half or more than 50% women) </li></ul><ul><li>Childcare co-ops (87% have more than 50% women) (Standberg, 2002). </li></ul>
  5. 5. CCA Survey, 2001 (cont.) <ul><li>25% of co-ops have no women on their boards. </li></ul><ul><li>Co-ops in Alberta have 53.9% of boards with no women (the highest). </li></ul><ul><li>60% of agricultural co-ops have no woman board-member. </li></ul><ul><li>40% of production co-ops have no woman board member. </li></ul><ul><li>85% of rural co-ops have at least one woman on their boards. </li></ul><ul><li>61% of urban co-ops have at least one woman on their boards. </li></ul><ul><li>S tandberg, Coro. Co-ops demonstrate that community involvement is more than dollars . The Canadian Co-operative Association Newsletter. Autumn 2002. Available: http://www.coopscanada.coop/NewsLetter/CSR/ </li></ul>
  6. 6. Men’s and Women’s Leadership Styles <ul><li>Leadership: The ability to influence a group toward the achievement of goals. </li></ul><ul><li>In general, women use a democratic leadership style </li></ul><ul><ul><li>encourage participation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>share power and information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>attempt to enhance followers’ self-worth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>prefer to lead through inclusion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Men feel more comfortable with a directive command-and-control style </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rely on formal authority </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Outline <ul><li>This presentation will give an overview of the research being conducted on female leadership. </li></ul><ul><li>Delia will present specific examples of constraints and opportunities in female leadership and women’s participation in BC aquaculture co-operatives. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Females dominate in the early stages of co-op development but are replaced by men once the co-op obtains funding. </li></ul><ul><li>Men network informally in order to get their ideas heard. </li></ul><ul><li>Men show resentment if </li></ul><ul><li>challenged on their decisions and </li></ul><ul><li>are not always willing to discuss </li></ul><ul><li>problems openly. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Female leaders do not always get support from other women if they take certain positions or approaches. </li></ul><ul><li>Barriers were put in place after the female leader’s competence had been demonstrated. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Women have spend more time to back up all their ideas and decisions with hard facts whereas men can just take a position and be supported. </li></ul><ul><li>Women are willing to admit a lack of specific knowledge while men may make wrong decisions or become defensive instead of admitting lack of knowledge or inability to use knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Women are considered intimidating or aggressive if they ask pertinent or hard questions (too truthful). </li></ul>
  11. 11. Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Female leaders cannot show emotion and have to struggle to maintain their credibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Women are not heard (unless they have an older mentor). </li></ul>
  12. 12. Delia’s experiences <ul><li>Women who were nominated to the Board by a female leader performed all the typically female roles but did not take any decision-making roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Hidden agendas </li></ul>
  13. 13. Conclusion <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Start-up manuals should go beyond the technical information and include this “fuzzy stuff” so that start-up co-ops can obtain funding to deal with these problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding should be made available to hire retired Credit Union experts to sit on start-up Boards as the ‘power behind the throne’. </li></ul><ul><li>The co-op manual should provide information to female leaders on how to manage their leadership roles and their relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Start-up co-ops should obtain funding to train their staff in management so that when the paid positions do become available the women who started the co-op can fill them from within. </li></ul>

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