2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Literary Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Listen and Learn The Greatest Show o...
3Lesson 5: Writing Fictional Narratives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 671. Get Ready: Brainstorm . . . . . . . . ....
4Lesson 9: Reading Poetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145Listen and Learn Two Rivers . ....
Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 5Lesson1ESSENTIAL QUESTIONWhy would an authorwant to tell about peopleor events fro...
ConsiderListen and Learn6 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction1 “There’s a sucker born every minute!” Many believeP. T. ...
Listen and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 7In your mind, travel back to the nineteenth century inthe United S...
8 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionANALOGY An analogycompares relationships betweentwo different sets of things; fore...
Listen and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 9Retorting in their typical jovial banter, Barnum replied,“Oh no. I...
10 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionListen and LearnComprehension CheckLook back in “The Greatest Show on Earth” to n...
Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 11Listen and LearnVocabularyUse the word map below to help you define and use one o...
Considerin The Humbugs of the Worldby P. T. Barnum1 James C. Adams, or “Grizzly Adams,” as he was generallytermed, from th...
Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 13Share and LearnOld Adams had trained all these monsters so that with himthey were...
14 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionThe immediate object of “Old Adams” in calling upon mewas this. I had purchased o...
Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 15Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following question...
Share and LearnRead another piece of literary nonfiction, “The Life and Adventures ofAlexandre Dumas,” independently. Apply...
Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 6
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 6

1,177

Published on

The total CCGPS package, built from the ground up—in full color.

Reading and writing lessons that are genre-specific and differentiated enable learners to meet the rigors of the CCGPS.

Georgia Common Core ELA Coach has been built from the ground up using an integrated approach that suits the philosophy of the Common Core Georgia Performance Standards. Both comprehensive and easy to use, it provides grade-level-appropriate content at a new depth of instruction.

Student texts are organized around reading and writing genres and cover all CCGPS in logical clusters, in the context of reading selections or examples of writing types. Reading lessons use modeled passages and writing and language units use 'mentor texts' to exemplify and teach skills. All lessons are structured around the research-proven model of gradual release, including explicit teacher-led instruction, collaborative peer work, and independent practice.

Georgia Common Core Coach delivers:

Clear lessons to help your students master achievements emphasized by
the CCGPS, including expectations for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language conventions
Anchor standards set the instructional path toward College and Career Readiness (CCR)

Grade-specific CCGPS define cumulative progression and end-of-year requirements; CCR anchor standards define cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that students must meet if they are to find success in college or workforce training programs.

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,177
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 6"

  1. 1. 2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Literary Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Listen and Learn The Greatest Show on Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Share and Learn “Chapter IV: Old Grizzly Adams” in The Humbugsof the World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12Read On Your Own The Life and Adventures ofAlexandre Dumas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 2: Writing Personal Narratives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171. Get Ready: Brainstorm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232. Organize: Introduction, Beginning, Middle, End, and Conclusion . 263. Draft: Using Transition Words and Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284. Peer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305. Revise: Using Precise Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346. Edit: Pronouns: Avoiding Shifts in Number and Person . . . . . . . . . . 367. Publish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40Lesson 3: Reading Fiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41Listen and Learn “Chapter VII: A Woman’s Courage” from Journey tothe Center of the Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42Share and Learn I, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50Read On Your Own The Lucky Teakettle . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 4: Reading Historical Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55Listen and Learn How a Bill Becomes a Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56Share and Learn How to Become a United States Presidential Candidate 62Read On Your Own The Impeachment Process . . . . Online HandoutCommon CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RI.6.1; RI.6.2; RI.6.3; RI.6.4;RI.6.9; RI.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.4.a, c, d; L.6.5.a–c;RH.6-8.1; RH.6-8.2; RH.6-8.9;RH.6-8.10W.6.3.a–e;W.6.4;W.6.5;W.6.6;W.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.1.c; L.6.4.a, c, d; L.6.5.b, cRL.6.1; RL.6.2; RL.6.3; RL.6.4;RL.6.6; RL.6.9; RL.6.10;SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.4.a, c, d;L.6.5.a–cRI.6.2; RI.6.4; RI.6.10;SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.4.a–d; L.6.6;RH.6-8.1; RH.6-8.2; RH.6-8.3;RH.6-8.4; RH.6-8.5; RH.6-8.7;RH.6-8.10
  2. 2. 3Lesson 5: Writing Fictional Narratives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 671. Get Ready: Brainstorm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732. Organize: Introduction, Plot/Problem, Climax, and Resolution . . . . 763. Draft: Using Dialogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 784. Peer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805. Revise: Using Sensory Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 846. Edit: Pronoun Case and Intensifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 867. Publish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90Lesson 6: Reading Drama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91Listen and Learn Mission to Mars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92Share and Learn The Legend of King Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98Read On Your Own Things That Go Bumpin the Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 7: Reading Scientific and Technical Texts . . . . . . . 105Listen and Learn Journey to Earth’s Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106Share and Learn Geothermal Heating and Cooling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112Read On Your Own Arctic Survival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 8: Writing Informative Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1171. Get Ready: Take Notes on Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1232. Organize: Topic Sentence, Supporting Details, and Conclusion. . . 1303. Draft: Transition Words and Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1324. Peer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1345. Revise: Style and Tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1386. Edit: Spelling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1407. Publish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144Common CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)W.6.3.a–e;W.6.4;W.6.5;W.6.6;W.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.1.a, b; L.6.5.aRL.6.1; RL.6.2; RL.6.3; RL.6.4;RL.6.5; RL.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.4.d; L.6.5.aRI.6.2; RI.6.4; RI.6.10;SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.4.a–d; L.6.6;RST.6-8.1;RST.6-8.2;RST.6-8.4;RST.6-8.5;RST.6-8.6;RST.6-8.7;RST.6-8.10W.6.2.a–f;W.6.4;W.6.5;W.6.6;W.6.7;W.6.8;W.6.10;SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.2.b; L.6.3.b;L.6.4.a, c; L.6.6
  3. 3. 4Lesson 9: Reading Poetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145Listen and Learn Two Rivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146Share and Learn Memory’s River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150Read On Your Own The Gladness of Nature / Lines Written inEarly Spring / An April Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 10: Writing Responses to Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . 1551. Get Ready: Brainstorm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1652. Organize: Introduction, Main Points, and Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . 1683. Draft: Using Linking Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1704. Peer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1725. Revise: Varying Sentence Structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1766. Edit: Vague Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1787. Publish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182Lesson 11: Reading Persuasive Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183Listen and Learn Co-Ed Conflict . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184Share and Learn Should Columbus Day Be Renamed? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190Read On Your Own Fair Pay for Fair Play . . . . . . . . . Online HandoutLesson 12: Writing Opinion Pieces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1951. Get Ready: Brainstorm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012. Organize: Opinion, Reasons, Details, and Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . 2043. Draft: Using Relationships Between Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2064. Peer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2085. Revise: Using Formal Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2126. Edit: Using Commas and Parentheses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2147. Publish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218Writing Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236Common CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RL.6.1; RL.6.2; RL.6.4; RL.6.5;RL.6.6; RL.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.4.d; L.6.5.aW.6.2.a–c, f;W.6.4;W.6.5;W.6.6;W.6.7;W.6.8;W.6.9.a;W.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.1.d;L.6.3.a; L.6.5.cRI.6.1; RI.6.2; RI.6.3; RI.6.4;RI.6.5; RI.6.6; RI.6.8; RI.6.10;SL.6.1.a–d; L.6.4.d; L.6.5.c;RH.6-8.6; RH.6-8.8;RH.6-8.10; RST.6-8.8W.6.1.a–e;W.6.4;W.6.5;W.6.6;W.6.10; SL.6.1.a–d;L.6.1.e; L.6.2.a; L.6.4.b
  4. 4. Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 5Lesson1ESSENTIAL QUESTIONWhy would an authorwant to tell about peopleor events from long ago?ReadingLiteraryNonfictionLook at this picture of agrizzly bear.Why would an entertainer includea dangerous bear in his act? Why doyou think people would pay to seehis shows?
  5. 5. ConsiderListen and Learn6 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction1 “There’s a sucker born every minute!” Many believeP. T. Barnum exclaimed this during his lifetime. There is noproof that he did, but it’s easy to understand why such anexclamation would be attributed to Barnum. It fits with whatis known about his life and his interactions with James“Grizzly” Adams.Thinking of Barnum might make you think of athree-ring circus and The Greatest Show on Earth. Thinkingof Grizzly Adams conjures up images of huge, menacingbears. The great entertainers Barnum and Adams were animportant part of nineteenth-century American culture.PRIMARY AND SECONDARYSOURCES A primary source isa document written or createdby someone who experiencedan event.An autobiographyis an author’s life story. Otherprimary sources include letters,interviews, speeches, and diaries.A secondary source is written bysomeone who was not part of anevent. Secondary sources includetextbooks, biographies, andarticles that discuss or reportevents based on information inprimary sources. How can youdetermine whether paragraph 1is a primary or secondarysource?FIGURATIVE LANGUAGEThe meaning of a figurativeexpression is not determined byknowing the meaning of eachword in it.The phrase conjuresup means “to make appearmagically,” but it does not meanthat in paragraph 2. It is a figureof speech, a type of figurativelanguage. Other types includesimile (which uses like or as),metaphor, and personification.What is the meaning of conjuresup in paragraph 2?What was the relationship between P. T. Barnum andGrizzly Adams?How were Barnum and Adams alike, and how werethey different?GREATEST SHOWTheon EARTHPhineas T. Barnum
  6. 6. Listen and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 7In your mind, travel back to the nineteenth century inthe United States, a period when the Industrial Revolutionallowed Americans more leisure time, when people werelooking for entertainment. P. T. Barnum was right there tofill the bill.Barnum made a sport—and a living—out of hoaxes. Heenticed others to pay to see his attractions, some real andsome not so real. People came to see trained fleas, paradingelephants, and a 161-year-old woman!5 His star attraction, however, was an African elephantnamed Jumbo. Some people believe that the word jumbodidn’t exist before Barnum. In fact, Jumbo was already theelephant’s name when Barnum bought the animal for hiscircus. Barnum kept the name Jumbo and used it to advertisehis star attraction. The word jumbo became a frequently usedword in the English language as a synonym for enormous.CONTEXT CLUES Contextclues are nearby words andphrases that help you figure outthe meaning of an unknownword or phrase.What contextclues help you figure out themeaning of the figurativeexpression fill the bill at theend of paragraph 3?CONNOTATION ANDDENOTATION A word’sdenotation is the dictionarymeaning of the word.A wordcan also have a connotation;it can imply a judgment oran emotional meaning. Forexample, the word infernomeans “a fire.” But infernohas the connotation of a huge,uncontrollable, destructive fire.What word in paragraph 5 hasthe connotation of “somethingbigger than can be described”?Jumbo’s farewell to London
  7. 7. 8 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionANALOGY An analogycompares relationships betweentwo different sets of things; forexample, paw is to cat as hoofis to horse. Complete thisanalogy from the informationin paragraph 7: Jumbo was toBarnum aswas to Adams.CENTRAL IDEA The centralidea is the most important ideain a passage, or what thepassage is mostly about.Whatare paragraphs 7 through 9mostly about? What does thepassage tell you about Barnumand Adams?CITE EVIDENCE Whatexamples from paragraph 9support the central idea? Whatexamples from paragraph 9show the author is telling thestory in a creative way?PREDICT WORD MEANINGTo predict word meaning, youcan look at parts of a word andthink about nearby words andphrases.When you first see theword fanfare in paragraph 9,what do you think it means?Why? After you read thesentence, do you find that theword means what you hadpredicted? Explain.By the mid-1800s, Barnum was showing attractions atBarnum’s American Museum in New York City. There, heand Grizzly Adams met to talk about an entertainment deal.Adams had earned his nickname, “Grizzly Adams,”while hunting and trapping grizzly bears in the mountainsin and around California. Adams’s “Jumbo” was a grizzlynamed General Fremont. General Fremont and other bearstraveled with Adams to New York.Barnum wrote about Adams, who would grow to be aclose friend, saying Adams was nearly as wild as the beastshe hunted and trapped. The two struck an agreement forBarnum to manage Adams’s grizzly bear shows in New York.Barnum had a huge tent set up for the advertisedCalifornia Menagerie.1The show opened to fanfare in thestreet. An open wagon followed a marching band. Adamsand his grizzlies stood on the wagon, with Adams “riding”on Fremont’s back.10 Adams’s show attracted thousands of paying customers.After six weeks, though, a combination of injuries and feversent Adams to bed. A doctor advised him he would notsurvive much longer. But Adams said he was strong; hegradually improved.Adams wanted to take the show on the road, but Barnumadvised against it. He thought Adams was too ill to continueperforming. Insisting that he washealthy enough to continue,Adams asked for a bonus forcompleting the road tour.Barnum jokingly offered$500—a fortune at that time—because he never thoughtAdams would live long enoughto complete the road tour.Adams accepted. He alsoaccepted a new hunting suitfrom Barnum for the shows.Adams said, “Mr. B., I supposeyou’re going to give me thisnew hunting-dress.”1menagerie a collection ofwild or unusual animals shownin an exhibition
  8. 8. Listen and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 9Retorting in their typical jovial banter, Barnum replied,“Oh no. I got that for your successor, who will exhibit thebears tomorrow; besides, you have no possible use for it.”Adams convinced Barnum to let him keep the suit untilhe was “done with it.” Thinking Adams would be done with itsoon, Barnum agreed. But Adams got the last laugh.Adams made it through the ten weeks of shows on theroad, although his health was failing. Barnum paid thebonus. Knowing he would not survive much longer, Adamsasked his wife to be certain he would be buried in thehunting suit, and he was. He used it until he was “done withit” and then some. While Adams did not survive, stories ofthe jovial bond between P. T. Barnum and Grizzly Adamscertainly did.USE REFERENCE SOURCESA reference source, such as adictionary, thesaurus, or glossary,can help readers understandcontent. In paragraph 12, theauthor uses the word jovialto describe the relationshipbetween Barnum and Adams.Which resource would be thebest for finding the meaningof jovial?ANALYZE AUTHOR’STECHNIQUE Literary nonfictionprovides facts and information ina creative way. Often the authorincludes entertaining examplesand stories to engage the reader.Look at paragraph 14. How doesthe author entertain the reader?the author entertain the reaMAKE INFERENCES Whenmaking an inference, a readeruses facts that are statedto support an understanding oran idea that is not stated.Whydid the stories about the bondbetween Barnum and Adamssurvive? What information in theselection supports your answer?
  9. 9. 10 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionListen and LearnComprehension CheckLook back in “The Greatest Show on Earth” to note uses of figurative language. Use thegraphic organizer to write three sentences from the selection that include this kind oflanguage. In your table, explain the meaning of the figurative language. Then use figurativelanguage in a sentence to describe the relationship between Barnum and Adams.Example of Sentence withFigurative LanguageMeaningA. “There’s a sucker born every minute!” There are many people who are easy to fool.B.C.D. Write a sentence using figurative language that describes the relationship betweenBarnum and Adams.
  10. 10. Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 11Listen and LearnVocabularyUse the word map below to help you define and use one of the highlighted vocabulary wordsfrom the Share and Learn selection you are about to read or another word you choose.invincibleferociousrenderedspeculationdocileapparatusMy wordSynonyms AntonymsDefinition Other formsMy sentence
  11. 11. Considerin The Humbugs of the Worldby P. T. Barnum1 James C. Adams, or “Grizzly Adams,” as he was generallytermed, from the fact of his having captured so many grizzlybears and encountered such fearful perils by his unexampleddaring, was an extraordinary character. For many years a hunterand trapper in the Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, heacquired a recklessness which, added to his natural invinciblecourage, rendered him truly one of the most striking men of theage. He was emphatically what the English call a man of “pluck.”In 1860, he arrived in New York with his famous collection ofCalifornia animals, captured by himself, consisting of twenty orthirty immense grizzly bears, at the head of which stood “OldSampson”—now in the American Museum—wolves, half a dozenother species of bear, California lions, tigers, buffalo, elk, etc., and“Old Neptune,” the great sea-lion from the Pacific.Share and LearnHow do “The Greatest Show on Earth” and “Old Grizzly Adams”both tell information in interesting, creative ways?How does this passage, which was written by Barnum, help youbetter understand “The Greatest Show on Earth”?CONNOTATION ANDDENOTATION The wordperils denotes a danger.What is the connotationof the word perils?CAUSE AND EFFECTWhat is James Adams’snickname? How did heget that name?12 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction“CHAPTER IV:OLD GRIZZLY ADAMS”from
  12. 12. Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 13Share and LearnOld Adams had trained all these monsters so that with himthey were as docile as kittens, while many of the most ferociousamong them would attack a stranger without hesitation, if hecame within their grasp. In fact, the training of these animals wasno fool’s play, as Old Adams learned to his cost; for the terrificblows which he received from time to time, while teaching them“docility,” finally cost him his life.When Adams and his other wild beasts (for he was nearly aswild as any of them) arrived in New York, he called immediately atthe Museum. He was dressed in his hunter’s suit of buckskin. . . .In fact, Old Adams was quite as much of a show as his bears. Theyhad come around Cape Horn on the clipper-ship Golden Fleece,and a sea-voyage of three and a half months had probably notadded much to the beauty or neat appearance of the oldbear-hunter.During our conversation, Grizzly Adams took off his cap, andshowed me the top of his head . . . the last blow from the bearcalled “General Fremont.” . . . I remarked that I thought that was adangerous wound, and might possibly prove fatal.5 “Yes,” replied Adams, “that will fix me out. . . . I’m a used-upman. However, I reckon I may live six months or a year yet.”This was spoken as coolly as if he had been talking about thelife of a dog.FIGURATIVE LANGUAGEFind two instances offigurative language usedin paragraph 2.Whatdoes each mean?COMPARE How wasthe behavior of the bearsdifferent with Adams andwith others? Are wildanimals ever completely safearound humans? Explain.PRIMARY ANDSECONDARY SOURCESIs this passage a primarysource or a secondarysource? How can you tell?ANALYZE AUTHOR’STECHNIQUE How doesthe author comment whenAdams says he has sixmonths or a year to live?How does this commentchange the impact ofAdams’s response?The artist who designed this flag used GrizzlyAdamss bear as a model for the drawing.
  13. 13. 14 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionThe immediate object of “Old Adams” in calling upon mewas this. I had purchased one-half interest in his Californiamenagerie from a man who had come by way of the Isthmusfrom California, and who claimed to own an equal interest withAdams in the show. Adams declared that the man had onlyadvanced him some money, and did not possess the right tosell half of the concern. However, the man held a bill of sale forone-half of the “California Menagerie,” and Old Adams finallyconsented to accept me as an equal partner in the speculation,saying that he guessed I could do the managing part, and hewould show up the animals. I obtained a canvas tent, anderecting it on the present site of Wallack’s Theatre, Adams thereopened his novel California Menagerie. On the morning ofopening, a band of music preceded a procession of animal-cages,down Broadway and up the Bowery; Old Adams dressed in hishunting costume, heading the line, with a platform-wagon onwhich were placed three immense grizzly bears, two of which heheld by chains, while he was mounted on the back of the largestgrizzly, which stood in the centre, and was not secured in anymanner whatever. This was the bear known as “GeneralFremont;” and so docile had he become that Adams said hehad used him as a packbear to carry his cooking and huntingapparatus through the mountains for six months, and had riddenhim hundreds of miles. But apparently docile as were many ofthese animals, there was not one among them that would notoccasionally give even Adams a sly blow or a sly bite when a goodchance offered; hence Old Adams was but a wreck of his formerself, and expressed pretty nearly the truth when he said:“Mr. Barnum, I am not the man I was five years ago. Then Ifelt able to stand the hug of any grizzly living, and was alwaysglad to encounter, single-handed, any sort of an animal thatdared present himself. But I have been beaten to a jelly, tornalmost limb from limb, and nearly chawed up and spit out bythese treacherous grizzly bears. However, I am good for a fewmonths yet. . . . ”MAKE INFERENCES ANDCITE EVIDENCE Whymight the three grizzlies hitor bite Adams occasionally?Cite evidence from theselection that supportsyour inference.CHRONOLOGY Did thisconversation betweenBarnum and Adams happenbefore or after the events inthe last two paragraphs of“The Greatest Show onEarth”? How can you tell?CENTRAL IDEA Whatmain message does theauthor give about Adamsthroughout the selection?Underline examples thatconvey this message.
  14. 14. Lesson 1 • Reading Literary Nonfiction 15Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following questions with your peer group. Then record your answers in thespace provided.1. The author of the first article describes the bond between P. T. Barnum and GrizzlyAdams as “jovial.” Based on Barnum’s descriptions in the second article, “Old GrizzlyAdams,” what is another word you could use to describe their friendship? Support youranswer with details from the text.2. How does each article treat the subject of Adams’s early death? Support your answerwith details from both texts.
  15. 15. Share and LearnRead another piece of literary nonfiction, “The Life and Adventures ofAlexandre Dumas,” independently. Apply what you learned in this lessonand check your understanding.Read On Your Own16 Lesson 1 • Reading Literary NonfictionComprehension Check1. How does the passage titled “Old Grizzly Adams” differ from “The Greatest Show onEarth”? Support your responses with information from the passages.2. Suppose Adams had traveled to New York immediately after he captured the grizzlybears, before he spent time training them. What would have been the likely result?3. Read the following statement made by Adams: “Mr. Barnum, I am not the man I was fiveyears ago. . . . However, I am good for a few months yet. . . .” Why was Adams not theman he had been five years earlier? Based on “The Greatest Show on Earth” and “OldGrizzly Adams,” why do you think Adams believed he was “good for a few months yet”?

×