Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 5

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The total CCGPS package, built from the ground up—in full color.

Reading and writing lessons that are genre-specific and differentiated enable learners to meet the rigors of the CCGPS.

Georgia Common Core ELA Coach has been built from the ground up using an integrated approach that suits the philosophy of the Common Core Georgia Performance Standards. Both comprehensive and easy to use, it provides grade-level-appropriate content at a new depth of instruction.

Student texts are organized around reading and writing genres and cover all CCGPS in logical clusters, in the context of reading selections or examples of writing types. Reading lessons use modeled passages and writing and language units use 'mentor texts' to exemplify and teach skills. All lessons are structured around the research-proven model of gradual release, including explicit teacher-led instruction, collaborative peer work, and independent practice.

Georgia Common Core Coach delivers:

Clear lessons to help your students master achievements emphasized by
the CCGPS, including expectations for reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language conventions
Anchor standards set the instructional path toward College and Career Readiness (CCR)

Grade-specific CCGPS define cumulative progression and end-of-year requirements; CCR anchor standards define cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that students must meet if they are to find success in college or workforce training programs.

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Georgia Common Core Coach CCGPS Edition, English Language Arts, Grade 5

  1. 1. EnglishLanguageArts 5CommonCoreCoachGEORGIAFirst Edition
  2. 2. 2ContentsLesson 1: Reading Stories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5Listen.and.Learn A.Snare.for.Srayosi .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .6Share.and.Learn Into.the.Maze. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14Read.On.Your.Own The.Famous.Merkel. . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 2: Reading Drama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Listen.and.Learn Stage.Fright. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26Share.and.Learn Heave,.Ho!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36Read.On.Your.Own Bright.Mistakes . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 3: Writing Fictional Narratives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .451. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .512. Organize:.Beginning,.Middle,.and.Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .543. Draft:.Using.Transitional.Words.and.Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .564. Peer.Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585. Revise:.Using.Sensory.Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .626. Edit:.Conjunctions,.Prepositions,.and.Interjections. . . . . . . . . .647. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68Lesson 4: Reading Historical Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69Listen.and.Learn Tenochtitlán:.Life.in.the.Aztec.Capital. . . . . . . . . . .70Share.and.Learn The.Rise.and.Fall.of.Tenochtitlán. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80Read.On.Your.Own Machu.Picchu. . . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutCommon CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RL.5.1; RL.5.2; RL.5.3; RL.5.5;RL.5.6; RL.5.9; RL.5.10;RF.5.4.a; SL.5.1RL.5.1; RL.5.2; RL.5.3; RL.5.5;RL.5.10; RF.5.4.a; SL.5.1W.5.3.a–e;W.5.4;W.5.5;W.5.6;W.5.8;W.5.10; SL.5.1;L.5.1.a; L.5.5.a, b; L.5.6RI.5.1; RI.5.2; RI 5.4; RI.5.5;RI.5.6; RI.5.7; RI.5.8; RI.5.9;RI.5.10; RF.5.4.a; RF.5.4.c;SL.5.1CC12_ELA_G5_SE_FM.indd 2 5/11/12 3:45 PM
  3. 3. 3Lesson 5: Writing Informative/Explanatory Texts. . . . . .911. Get.Ready:.Take.Notes.on.Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .972. Organize:.Main.Idea,.Supporting.Details,.and.Conclusion. . .1023. Draft:.Using.Linking.Words.and.Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1044. Peer.Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1065. Revise:.Using.Precise.Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1106. Edit:.Varying.Sentence.Style .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .1127. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116Lesson 6: Reading Technical Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117Listen.and.Learn How.a.Meteorologist.Predicts.the.Weather. . . . .118Share.and.Learn Reading.a.Weather.Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126Read.On.Your.Own Tropical.Storms. . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 7: Writing Personal Narratives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1351. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm.a.Topic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1402. Organize:.Beginning,.Middle,.and.Ending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1443. Draft:.Using.Transitional.Words.and.Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1464. Peer.Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1485. Revise:.Using.Effective.Punctuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1526. Edit:.Perfect.Tense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1547. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158Lesson 8: Reading Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159Listen.and.Learn Hiawatha’s.Fishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160Share.and.Learn Hiawatha’s.Fishing.(cont’d). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168Read.On.Your.Own The.Fly./.Petals./.I.Hear.America.Singing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutCommon CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)W.5.2.a–e;W.5.4;W.5.5;W.5.6;W.5.7;W.5.8;W.5.9.b;W.5.10; SL.5.1; L.5.3.a; L.5.4.cRI.5.1; RI.5.4; RI.5.5; RI.5.7;RI.5.10; RF.5.4.a; SL.5.1W.5.3.a–e;W.5.4;W.5.5;W.5.6;W.5.8;W.5.10; SL.5.1;L.5.1.b–d; L.5.2.b, c; L.5.4.a;L.5.5.cRL.5.1; RL.5.2; RL.5.3; RL.5.4;RL.5.5; RL.5.10; RF.5.4.a;SL.5.1CC12_ELA_G5_SE_FM.indd 3 5/11/12 3:45 PM
  4. 4. 4Lesson 9: Reading Literature in Graphic Form. . . . . . . .177Listen.and.Learn Sir.Gawain.and.the.Green.Knight,.Part.1 . . . . . . .178Share.and.Learn Sir.Gawain.and.the.Green.Knight,.Part.2 . . . . . . .184Read.On.Your.Own An.Actor./.Toyonobu:.An.Exile’s.Return./.A.Woman.Standing.by.a..Gate.with.an.Umbrella. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 10: Writing Responses to Literature. . . . . . . . . . .1931. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2012. Organize:.Main.Idea,.Details,.and.Conclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . .2043. Draft:.Using.Linking.Words.and.Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2064. Peer.Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2085. Revise:.Using.Precise.Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2126. Edit:.Spelling.Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2147. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218Lesson 11: Reading Scientific Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . .219Listen.and.Learn Leafcutter.Ants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220Share.and.Learn Elephant.Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226Read.On.Your.Own The.Record.Holders. . . . . . . Online . HandoutLesson 12: Writing Opinion Pieces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2351. Get.Ready:.Brainstorm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2412. Organize:.Opinion,.Supporting.Reasons,.and.Conclusion. . . .2443. Draft:.Using.Linking.Words.and.Phrases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2464. Peer.Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2485. Revise:.Using.Correlative.Conjunctions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2526. Edit:.Using.Punctuation.to.Clarify. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2547. Publish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258Writing Handbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272Common CoreGeorgia PerformanceStandards (GPS)RL.5.1; RL.5.2; RL.5.3; RL.5.5;RL.5.7; RL.5.10; RF.5.4.a;SL.5.1W.5.1.a–d;W.5.2.d;W.5.4;W.5.5;W.5.6;W.5.7;W.5.8;W.5.9.a;W.5.10; SL.5.1;L.5.2.e; L.5.3.a, bRI.5.1; RI.5.2; RI.5.3; RI.5.4;RI.5.5; RI.5.10; RF.5.4.a;SL.5.1RF.5.3.a;W.5.1.a–d;W.5.4;W.5.5;W.5.6;W.5.10; SL.5.1;L.5.1.e; L.5.2.a, b, d; L.5.4.bCC12_ELA_G5_SE_FM.indd 4 5/11/12 3:45 PM
  5. 5. Look at this underwaterscene. Do you think this wouldbe a good setting for a story?Why or why not?What are the importantparts of a good short story?ESSENTIAL QUESTIONLesson1ReadingShortStoriesLesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 5
  6. 6. NARRATOR The narratorof a short story is the personwho tells the story. If thestory is told by one of thecharacters in the story, it istold from the first-personpoint of view. In first-personpoint of view, the narratoruses the pronoun I. If thestory is told by someonewho is not a character in thestory, it is told from thethird-person point of view.In third-person point ofview, the narrator uses thepronouns he, she, and they.Who is the narrator of thisstory? How do you know?SHORT STORY A shortstory is a short fictionalnarrative with a beginning,middle, and ending.A shortstory is told in far fewer wordsthan a novel. Important partsof a short story are characters,setting, and plot.Whatcharacters are described onthis page? What do you learnabout them?Chapter 1Srayosi tried to wriggle free from the ropes around herwrists and ankles and then looked over at her twin brother.Shah was gesturing desperately, shaking his head backand forth wildly. Like Srayosi, his hands and feet were tied,and they were both trapped underwater, at the bottomof an aquarium tank designed for marine mammals,not humans.Srayosi knew that average people can hold theirbreath for approximately thirty seconds. Luckily, Srayosiand Shah were far from average. They would have exactlyseven minutes and twelve seconds to escape from theirbindings and swim to the surface. The twin teens hadbeen practicing holding their breath since they werebabies. It was part of how they grew up.1Listen and LearnA Snare for SrayosiHow do you get to know the characters in a short story?Can you usually tell right away whether you like the characters?Consider6 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  7. 7. PLOT The plot of a storyis its series of events.Thefirst part of the plot tells thestory’s basic situation—thecharacters, setting, andconflict.The conflict is aproblem or struggle thatthe characters must face.As the characters deal withthe problem, obstacles getin their way.The problemor conflict grows more andmore serious; we describethis by saying that the action“rises.”The point wherethe problem is most seriousis called the climax, or thehigh point, of the story.Whatproblems have Srayosi andShah faced so far?Unluckily, their focus on escaping was interruptedby a loud grinding noise. The walls of the tank beganto move inward, making the room inside the tanksmaller and smaller, while the water rose higher andhigher. Srayosi and Shah might have six minutes of breathleft, but they would be crushed in less than three.Srayosi’s mind began racing faster and faster. Shecalculated that she had forty-five seconds to think of asolution and two minutes to get untied, untie Shah, swimto the top of the tank, and climb out. Fifteen seconds hadalready ticked away.Srayosi looked for a tool she could use to get the ropesoff her hands. But then Srayosi noticed that the glass floorof the tank was covered with slimy algae. She scoopedsome of it into her fingers and began to rub it on the ropesaround her wrists.Srayosi wriggled her wrists back and forth andscrunched her long, narrow fingers as tightly as possible.The slippery algae helped reduce the friction between herskin and the rope. In less than twenty seconds, Srayosi’shands were free.5Listen and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 7
  8. 8. If Shah could have spoken, he would have said, “Great,Sis!” Instead, he followed her lead and began scooping upalgae, too. There was just one problem. Srayosi and Shahwere twins, but physically, they couldn’t have been moredifferent. Srayosi was small and thin, while Shah was talland muscular. Shah’s size usually came in handy, but hishuge size wasn’t very useful at the moment.Most people saw Shah’s size and made the assumptionthat he was a hothead. In reality, Shah was able to remaincool in even the most torturous circumstances. In thissituation, Shah quickly understood that no matter howmuch algae he used, he was never going to wrigglehis humongous hands through the ropes. He began tomeditate, knowing that his sister would figure a way outfor the both of them. She always did.CITE EVIDENCE When youcite evidence, you look forinformation in the text thatsupports your thinking.Whatdo you know about Shah’scharacter? How does helook and act? Do you thinkhe is a good brother? Whatinformation in the story leadsyou to believe this?CHAPTERS Chapters aresections of a story. Often,the last part of a chapterwill give a clue about whatcomes next. Chapter 1 endswith Shah meditating andrelying on his sister to solvetheir predicament.What doyou think will happen in thenext chapter?8 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  9. 9. Listen and LearnNARRATOR A narratorcan have different pointsof view. If the point of viewis omniscient, the narratorknows the thoughts andfeelings of all the charactersin the story. If the point ofview is limited, the narratorknows only one character’sthoughts and feelings.Sometimes a narratorexpresses an opinion by theway he or she tells a story.Other times, the narratoris objective.The narratorpresents the action and thecharacters’ speech withoutcomment or emotion anddoes not reveal the thoughtsof the characters.The readerhas to interpret them anduncover their meaning. Howdoes the narrator’s point ofview in this story influencehow events are described?Chapter 2Exactly one and a half minutes had passed, and Srayosiwas completely untied. She knew that she didn’t have timeto untie Shah completely. She also knew that she couldn’tleave him there. Srayosi had only one firm plan in mind.She would untie the weight that was holding Shah down,push him to the surface, climb out of the tank, and thenpull her brother to safety.Step one was a bit challenging. Srayosi had no priorexperience with the knot connecting the rope to theweight. But her quick wit and able fingers worked inharmony, and she untied Shah in twenty-seven seconds.The next step was not very challenging at all. Srayosi gaveShah a shove, and he wiggled his way to the surface of thewater. Shah even gave Srayosi a nod as he swam to thesurface. This was going better than Srayosi had imagined.She climbed up onto the surface of the tank andgrabbed Shah under his arms. Then she pulled with allher might. Nothing happened. She couldn’t lift Shah’smassive, wet body out of the tank.10Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 9
  10. 10. SEQUENCE OF EVENTSThe sequence of events is theorder in which things happenin a story.The sequenceof events in a plot usuallymoves forward. However,sometimes the author goesback in time to tell aboutsomething that happenedin the past.Where in thisstory does the author usethis technique?MAKE CONNECTIONSBETWEEN TEXTS Often,stories in the same genre,or type, have similar features.For example, fairy talesoften include a memberof a royal family and sometype of magic.When youmake connections betweensimilar texts, you note theirsimilarities and differences.What similarities do you see inthis story and other adventurestories you have read? Howis this story different fromthem? Whom do you thinkthe footsteps belong to?What have you read in otherstories that would lead you tobelieve that?The tank’s walls were now about four feet apart. Shahwas at least three feet wide himself. Srayosi felt defeated,but she wasn’t about to give up. That’s when she heardthe sound of footsteps.“The IOATP!” Srayosi yelled. “They’re coming, Shah!You’ve got to get out. DO SOMETHING!”As it turned out, Srayosi was the hothead. She had triedmeditating, but it was never her thing. When the going gottough, Srayosi’s blood started boiling. She believed thismade her brain work fast when she was under pressure.But now, she was at her wit’s end. They had to get outbefore the IOATP found them.The IOATP were the International OrganizationAgainst Teen Power. Srayosi and Shah were part of aninternational society of teens trained since birth to fightcrime and injustice. They weren’t superheroes, but theywere pretty super. Villains everywhere hated them andformed their own group to battle them—the IOATP. Theyhad put Srayosi and Shah in the tank in the first place.1510 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  11. 11. Listen and LearnTHEME The theme of ashort story is its messageabout life. Usually, the authordoesn’t directly tell you thetheme.You have to figure itout yourself by looking at thecharacters, their words andactions, and the setting of thestory. What do you think isthe theme of this story?PLOT The plot of a storyends when the problemshave been resolved.This iscalled the resolution.What isthe resolution of this story?Srayosi tried one last time to lift her brother from thetank. The footsteps were right behind her. Things werebad, yet Shah was smiling.“Mom!” Shah cheered as his muscled motherreached past Srayosi and pulled him to safety. Srayosihad inherited her mother’s hotheadedness, but it wasShah who got her size and strength.“How did you find us?” Srayosi wondered aloud.“Shah and I have been working on meditativetransmissions,” she explained. “He’s able to send memental pictures when he meditates. I saw where you were,and I knew you needed me.”“Mom to the rescue,” Shah said.“Always!” their mom replied lovingly. “Now let’s get outof here. I set some explosives, and they’re about to go offin 5 . . . 4 . . . 3 . . . 2 . . .”20Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 11
  12. 12. Comprehension CheckThink about what you learned about the main characters in “A Snare for Srayosi.”Look back through the story for evidence that tells you about their charactertraits in the things they do, the words they say, and in how they are described.Think about how they are alike and how they are different. Then use theinformation to fill in the Venn diagram below.SimilarCharacterTraitsSrayosi Shah12 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  13. 13. Listen and LearnVocabularyUse the word map below to help you define and use one of the highlightedvocabulary words from the Share and Learn selection you are about to reador another word you choose.reckless nimble forebodingcorridor massive nestledMy wordSynonyms AntonymsDefinition Other formsMy sentenceLesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 13
  14. 14. Share and LearnHow do you feel when you go to a place you’ve neverbeen before?Do you like to rush right in or take your time?ConsiderDo yyou like to rush riggghhttt iinnn ooorrr tttake yyour time?Into the MazeTheo took one tentative step into the corn maze, thenstopped in his tracks. He grabbed a dried husk and examinedit. The corn stalk had to be at least double his height, aroundtwelve feet tall. The plants were packed together so tightly,it was difficult to see through them. Walls of corn woundthis way and that, with no end in sight. For a place that wassupposed to be the area’s main attraction, it was eerily quiet.Of course, Ariana had raced right in. “Act first, think later”was her motto.1CHARACTER TRAITSWhat do you learn aboutthe traits of Theo andhis friend Ariana early inthe story?Underline the words thattell you about Theo, andcircle the words thatdescribe Ariana.14 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  15. 15. “Ariana!” Theo shout-whispered to his best friend.“Come back!”Ariana rushed back to the start of the maze, breathless.Her cheeks were flushed with excitement.“This is so cool, Theo!” she said. “What are you waiting for?”“I’m waiting because it’s the right thing to do, Ariana,”Theo said sensibly. “We can’t just rush in here without havinga plan.”“Oh, right, a plan,” Ariana replied. “You’re the planner.What’s our plan?”Theo sighed. He loved Ariana’s sense of adventure. Shewas willing to do anything and go anywhere on a moment’snotice, like heading to this strange place just because theirnew team trainer had given her a “special event” pass to it.Mr. Minos was okay as far as trainers go, but Theo wasn’tabout to follow him to the ends of the earth—or into adeserted maze, especially when they had the big lacrossechampionship game later that day. Seriously, Ariana shouldhave known better. But she had been too excited about theadventure to worry about the game.“Ariana, I agree that this looks like an interesting place,”Theo said. “But why isn’t anybody here? Isn’t this supposedto be a special event?”“It is a little odd, Theo,” Ariana said. “But you’re the onewho made us leave the dorms an hour before we needed to.Maybe everyone’s coming fashionably late.”“Doubtful,” Theo said. “Anyway, I’m not taking anotherstep into this maze until we figure out a way to track ourpath. If we can find the way we went in, we can always finda way out.”“Good plan, planner,” Ariana replied as she shuffledthrough the pockets of her windbreaker. “Except that Ididn’t bring anything we could use. I only have a bluehighlighter I forgot to take out of my pocket the last timeI wore this jacket.”“That will do,” Theo said. “We can mark a stalk everyfew feet.”510MAKE CONNECTIONSBETWEEN TEXTS Howare Theo and Arianasimilar to the twinsSrayosi and Shah in theprevious story? How arethey different?NARRATOR Who istelling this story? Is thestory told from a limitedor omniscient point ofview? Is the narratorobjective? How do youknow?Share and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 15
  16. 16. PLOT What is theconflict in this story?How can you tell theaction of the story isrising, or that the conflictis growing more serious?Underline the sentencethat shows rising action.The two friends headed into the maze. The fall air wascrisp and brisk, and now that he had a plan in place, Theodecided to relax and enjoy the experience. He liked spendingtime with Ariana, even though she could be a little reckless attimes. Plus, it was a good opportunity to go over their gameplan. Since Theo was the goalie and Ariana a defender, theyneeded to work together and communicate well. Arianahad a lot more experience than he did. While they talkedabout game strategy, Theo’s shoulders began to drop and hisforehead unfurrowed. And that’s when the giant metal crowswooped down from the sky.“DUCK!” a voice boomed as loud as thunder.Theo and Ariana used their nimble, athletic reflexes toduck to the ground just before the robot bird reached them.“What is that?” Theo yelled to Ariana. “And who told usto duck?”“RUN!” the invisible voice commanded.“I don’t know!” Ariana screamed back. “But I think we’dbetter listen!”Theo led the dash down the path. The mechanical flyingbeast turned awkwardly above the maze and headed backtoward them.“STOP!” the voice roared.“Stop?” Ariana questioned. “That doesn’t seem like suchgreat advice.”Theo had already stopped in his tracks.“Whoever it is, I think we’d better pay attention,” Theosaid. “Look!”Theo pointed to a hoe that was lying on the ground.Ariana picked it up and smiled. The best defense is agood offense.152025MAKE CONNECTIONS:TEXT-TO-SELF Haveyou ever traveled to anunfamiliar place with afriend or relative? Howdid having someone toshare the adventure withaffect your experience?16 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  17. 17. Ariana looked up as the creature came closer and closertoward them. She could see a space in the joint that heldthe wing to the bird’s body. She had one chance, so her aimwould have to be perfect. The crow dove toward them, andAriana raised the stick side of the hoe and lodged it in thejoint. The gears inside the crow started grinding. The crowtumbled and then crashed to the ground, its gears clangingloudly for a moment until they stopped working completely.“Okay, you were right,” Ariana said to Theo. “This place iscreepy. We should just get back to the dorms.”“Great plan,” Theo agreed. “But we didn’t have time tomark our path when we were running away from the crow.So . . . which way do we go?”“We came this way,” Ariana said as she led Theo backdown the path. “And then we turned right, and then left, andthen, well, then I’m not so sure, honestly.”“Me neither,” Theo admitted. “I think we made anotherleft.”“ARE YOU SURE?” the voice boomed. “YOU SHOULDBE SURE.”30A i l k d ttttthhhh t l d lShare and LearnLesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 17
  18. 18. CITE EVIDENCE Whywas Ariana remindedthat “looks are oftendeceiving”?Underline the sentencesthat explain your answer.MAKE CONNECTIONSBETWEEN TEXTS Howis the plot of this storysimilar to the plot of “ASnare for Srayosi”? Howare the plots different?“Who are you?” Theo yelled back. “And if you want to helpus, just tell us how to get out of here.”“BWAHAHAHA!” the foreboding voice laughed.“I COULD, BUT I WON’T. YOU’RE BOTH SCHOLAR-ATHLETES. YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO FIGURE IT OUTFOR YOURSELVES.”“Gee, thanks for the compliment,” Ariana replied. “Muchappreciated.”“DON’T MOCK THE MAZE MASTER,” the voice warned.“YOU WILL REGRET IT.”“Sorry,” Ariana answered. “Didn’t know you were sotouchy.”“Let’s just go,” Theo said. “I’m pretty sure it was left.”Ariana followed Theo as he led her through the windingmaze. He turned the corner quickly and headed down a longcorridor of corn, then turned right at the end of the path,then made another quick left. He definitely looked as if heknew where he was going. But when they came to a deadend at a solid wall of corn, Ariana was reminded that looksare often deceiving.“I’m sorry, Ari,” Theo apologized. “I really thought wewent left.”3518 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  19. 19. “No problem, Theo,” Ariana replied. “I got us into thismess. I’ll get us out.”Ariana started back the way they had come. The sunwas rising higher in the sky as the day got closer to noon.Even though the autumn weather was cool, Ariana took offher jacket and tied it around her waist. All the running andworrying was making her hot.“PUT YOUR JACKET BACK ON!” the voice ordered.“YOU’RE GOING TO NEED A WINDBREAKER.”“Um . . . okay,” Ariana said. “What does that mean?”Ariana and Theo turned as they heard an unfamiliarsound in the distance. The sound swirled and whirled, andwhen the two turned the next corner of the maze, they sawan immense vortex headed their way.“TORNADO TIME!” the Maze Master informed them.“ARE YOU READY FOR A WEATHER EMERGENCY?”This time it was Ariana who shouted the commands.“RUN!” she yelled as she grabbed Theo’s hand and ledhim away from the tornado.“PULL!” she cried as she grabbed a corn stalk and rippedit from the ground.“DIG!” she commanded as she scooped away dirt to makea trench in the ground.4045Share and LearnAUTHOR’SBACKGROUNDAND CULTURE Theauthor lives in a large citybut spends her summersin the country, wherethere are corn mazes.How might this story bedifferent if the author hadnever seen a corn maze?MAKE CONNECTIONSBETWEEN TEXTS Boththis story and “A Snarefor Srayosi” includemysterious or unexplainedelements.What are themost mysterious elementsof each story?Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 19
  20. 20. Ariana and Theo jumped into the trench and lay flat in it.Ariana pulled the corn stalks over them. They held handsand waited. And waited. The tornado never came. It musthave headed down another corn aisle before it disappeared.Ariana and Theo emerged from the trench.“Hey, Ari, that was impressively quick thinking,” Theosaid. “But did you really think a little trench and some deadcorn stalks were going to protect us from a tornado?”Ariana playfully punched her friend and laughed out loud.“Well, it was better than nothing!” she replied.Theo brushed the husks from his clothing, then off ofAriana’s back.“Wow, look at that!” he said as he pointed in the distance.The tornado hadn’t hit them, but it had damaged themaze. There was a large, clear circle where fields of corn hadbeen standing only a few minutes earlier.“I bet if we search the edges of that circle, we’ll find oneof our highlights!” Ariana said.“Great minds think alike!” Theo replied. “That’s just whatI was thinking. You go left, and I’ll go right. We’ll meet at thebottom of the circle. This way we can do the search in halfthe time.”“Great plan, as always,” said Ariana. “Let’s go!”5055PLOT Ariana and Theosurvive the tornado. Doyou think this is wherethe conflict will end? Whyor why not?20 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  21. 21. Listen and LearnMAKE CONNECTIONS:TEXT-TO-WORLD Howare the events in thisstory like events thatcould happen in the realworld? How are theyunlike real-world events?Ariana knew that they had made the highlights at eyelevel, so she quickly started around the circle, looking for asign that they had been down a path before. She was nearlyat the bottom of the circle when she saw the blue highlight onthe brown, dried leaf.“Theo!” she yelled. “I found it!”But when Ariana turned around, Theo was nowhere insight. And that’s when she heard him scream.Ariana raced toward the sound of Theo’s voice. She darteddown a row of corn and almost raced into the most massivespider web she had ever seen in her life. Then she steppedback and gasped. Theo was trapped by the web. And a giantspider was headed his way!“YOU NEED TO TAKE CONTROL, ARIANA,” the voicedirected.“Control? What’s that supposed to mean?” Ariana asked.“And how do you know my name?”Ariana spied something small and black nestled in thelight brown leaves. It was a remote control. The spider wastwo long-legged steps away from her teammate. Theo hadstopped screaming and had closed his eyes. Ariana did needto take control. She pushed the stop button, and the spiderbecame immobile.6065PLOT The climax is thehigh point in the action ofa short story.What is theclimax of this story?Underline the sentencesthat tell you about it.Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 21
  22. 22. SEQUENCE OF EVENTSUnderline the sentencethat tells about eventsthat happened priorto the events describedin the story.PLOT What is theresolution of this story?DETERMINE THEMEWhat do you think thetheme of this story is?How is it similar to thetheme of the story “ASnare for Srayosi”?How is it different?Ariana pulled Theo from the web. They rushed back tothe entrance of the maze just as sirens began to blare. Twopolice cruisers pulled up, and the team’s lacrosse coach,Ms. Ethra, jumped out of one of them.“Where’s Mr. Minos?” she questioned.“Mr. Minos?” asked Ariana. “What’s he got to dowith this?”“YOU’LL NEVER FIND ME!” the voice challenged.“Mr. Minos!” Theo and Ariana said at the same time.“When your teammates told me Mr. Minos had givenyou the pass to the maze, I started wondering,” Ms. Ethraexplained.“Mr. Minos holds the state record for saves,” a policeofficer explained. “He was a goalie twenty years ago, andno one’s even come close since then. But he knew that thecombination of a hot goalie with a stellar defender was areal threat. He decided to eliminate the competition.”“I NEVER MEANT TO HURT YOU,” Mr. Minos calledthrough the air. “I JUST WANTED YOU TO MISS THEGAME.”“We’ll take care of him,” the officer assured them. “Butyou two have a game to play. You’d better go.”Theo and Ariana got in the car and smiled at each other.They’d have just enough time on the ride back to finalizetheir game plan. It was going to be the best one ever.707522 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories
  23. 23. Share and LearnAnchor Standard Discussion QuestionsDiscuss the following questions with your peer group. Then record your answers inthe space provided.1. Do you think Theo and Ariana are ever in real danger in the story? Why or whynot? Support your answer with details from the text.2. Look back at the words the narrator uses to describe Theo and Arianathroughout the story. Do you think the narrator favors one character over theother? Explain why or why not, citing specific details from the text as support.Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories 23
  24. 24. Read another story, “The Famous Merkel,” independently. Applywhat you learned in this lesson and check your understanding.Read On Your OwnShare and LearnComprehension Check1. Why do Theo and Ariana go to the corn maze?2. Do you think Theo and Ariana work well together as a team? Cite details fromthe text that support your opinion.3. Based on what you know about Theo and Ariana, do you think they will win thelacrosse championship? Why or why not?24 Lesson 1 • Reading Short Stories

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