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Georgia Common Core Support Coach, CCGPS Edition, Target: Reading Comprehension, Grade 6

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Georgia Common Core Support Coach, CCGPS Edition, Target: Reading Comprehension

Georgia Common Core Support Coach, CCGPS Edition, Target: Reading Comprehension

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  • 1. First EditionFirstEditionThis book is printed on paper containinga minimum of 10% post-consumer waste.www.triumphlearning.comPhone: (800) 338-6519 • Fax: (866) 805-5723 • E-mail: customerservice@triumphlearning.com> Biographies> Dramas> Historical Fiction> Historical Texts> Memoirs> Persuasive Nonfiction> Poetry> Primary andSecondary Sources> Science Fiction> Science Texts> Short Stories> Technical TextsFocus onTargetDevelopedExclusivelyfortheCCSSReadingComprehension66TargetMaster the skills and strategies you needto comprehend complex texts!TARGET ReadingComprehensionReadingComprehensionGEORGIAT133GAISBN-13: 978-1-62362-042-49 7 8 1 6 2 3 6 2 0 4 2 49 0 0 0 0GEORGIA
  • 2. ContentsFictionLesson 1: Fiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Aaron’s Future Friend Draw and Support Inferences • Story Elements: Plot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8La Festival Calabaza  Theme • Story Elements: Characters . . . . . . . . 16Read on Your Own  High Hopes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Lesson 2: Drama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29The Love Story of Ch’unhyang, Act 1 Draw and Support Inferences • Figurative Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32The Love Story of Ch’unhyang, Act 2 Summarize • Dramatic Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40Read on Your Own  Lost and Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48Lesson 3: Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55The Glove and the Lions  Poetic Structure • Figurative Language. . 58Ozymandias / A Sphinx Visualize • Compare and Contrast Poetic Forms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64Read on Your Own  The Children’s Hour / Rain Music /Dust of Snow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70Lesson 4: Historical Fiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77The Warrior Makers Cite Textual Evidence for Inferences • Word Choice and Tone . . . . . . . . 80Cleopatra’s Revenge  Make Predictions • Point of View . . . . . . . . . . 88Read on Your Own  Farewell to Vinland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RL.6.3,RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.9,RL.6.10, L.6.4.a, L.6.5.cRL.6.1, RL.6.2, RL.6.4,RL.6.5, RL.6.10, L.6.4.a,L.6.4.b, L.6.5.aRL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.7,RL.6.8, RL.6.9, RL.6.10,L.6.4.c, L.6.4.d, L.6.5.a,L.6.6RL.6.1, RL.6.4, RL.6.6,RL.6.10, RI.6.6, L.6.5.b,L.6.6Common Core GeorgiaPerformance Standards(CCGPS)2Duplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLC
  • 3. NonfictionLesson 5: Literary Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101Shackleton: An Enduring Leader Central Idea and Supporting Details • Secondary Sources. . . . . . . . . . 104from Escape from the Antarctic Ask and Answer Questions • Primary Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112Read on Your Own  How Not to Go Camping /Camping on the Wild Side. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120Lesson 6: Historical Texts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125When in Rome . . . or Brazil Summarize • Chronology and Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128Restoring a Classic  Identify Steps in a Process • IntegrateVisual Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136Read on Your Own  The Evolution of Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144Lesson 7: Scientific Texts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149Opals: Rainbows in Stone Text Structure: Cause and Effect • Scientific Texts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152Rapa Nui: Island of Mystery Draw and Support Inferences • Integrate Visual Information . . . . . . . . 160Read on Your Own  Subways under the Sea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168Lesson 8: Technical Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173How to Move a Lighthouse Text Structure: Problem/Solution • Technical Texts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176Taking to the Air: The Technology of Flight Skim and Scan • Integrate Visual Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184Read on Your Own  The Technology of Ski Design. . . . . . . . . . 192RI.6.2, RI.6.9, RI.6.10,RH.6-8.1, RH.6-8.2,RH.6-8.9, L.6.4.b, L.6.4.c,L.6.4.dRI.6.2, RI.6.5, RI.6.7,RI.6.10, RH.6-8.2, RH.6-8.3,RH.6-8.5, RH.6-8.7, L.6.3.b,L.6.4.bRI.6.1, RI.6.3, RI.6.4, RI.6.5,RI.6.7, RI.6.10, RST.6-8.3,RST.6-8.4, RST.6-8.5,RST.6-8.7, L.6.5.b, L.6.6RI.6.3, RI.6.5, RI.6.7,RI.6.10, RST.6-8.3,RST.6-8.5, RST.6-8.7,L.6.4.c, L.6.6Common Core GeorgiaPerformance Standards(CCGPS)3Duplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLC
  • 4. Lesson 9: Persuasive Nonfiction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199Technology Is Killing My Movies! Author’s Point of View and Purpose • Author’s Argument. . . . . . . . . . 202Thank You, Technology! Denotation and Connotation • Evaluate Author’s Claims. . . . . . . . . . . . 210Read on Your Own  Bring Back the Band. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218Lesson 10: Primary and Secondary Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . 223Hello Blogheads!  Paraphrase • Primary Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226Into the Fire  Compare and Contrast • Secondary Sources. . . . . . . . . 234Read on Your Own The Effects of Social Media on Today’s Youth /Joanne’s Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249ToolsGraphic Organizers and Close Reading WorksheetsLesson 1: FictionAaron’s Future Friend. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257La Festival Calabaza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259Lesson 2: DramaThe Love Story of Ch’unhyang,Act 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261The Love Story of Ch’unhyang,Act 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263Lesson 3: PoetryThe Glove and the Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265Ozymandias / A Sphinx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267Lesson 4: Historical FictionThe Warrior Makers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269Cleopatra’s Revenge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271Lesson 5: Literary NonfictionShackleton: An Enduring Leader. . . . . . 273from Escape from the Antarctic . . . . . . . 275Lesson 6: Historical TextsWhen in Rome . . . or Brazil. . . . . . . . . . . 277Restoring a Classic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279Lesson 7: Scientific TextsOpals: Rainbows in Stone. . . . . . . . . . . . 281Rapa Nui: Island of Mystery. . . . . . . . . . . 283Lesson 8: Technical TextsHow to Move a Lighthouse . . . . . . . . . . . 285Taking to the Air: The Technologyof Flight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287Lesson 9: Persuasive NonfictionTechnology Is Killing My Movies!. . . . . . 289Thank You, Technology! . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291Lesson 10: Primary andSecondary SourcesHello Blogheads!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293Into the Fire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295RI.6.4, RI.6.5, RI.6.6, RI.6.8,RI.6.9, RI.6.10, RH.6-8.6,RH.6-8.8, L.6.4.b, L.6.5.b,L.6.5.cCommon Core GeorgiaPerformance Standards(CCGPS)RI.6.5, RI.6.9, RI.6.10,RH.6-8.1, RH.6-8.5,RH.6-8.9, L.6.3.a, L.6.4.c4Duplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLC
  • 5. Practice the SkillFirst Read Draw and Support InferencesAuthors often express their ideas directly, telling you exactly what they mean.Sometimes, they imply, or hint about, those ideas. In those cases, you need toinfer, or figure out, what the author means. When you draw an inference, youdecide what the author is stating indirectly in the text. Drawing inferencesrequires you to look for clues, or the facts and details in a text that show whatthe author wants to communicate. Following these clues helps you interpret theauthor’s message. You can then point to these clues to support the inferencesyou make. For instance, if you encounter a character packing a bag with summerclothes and a swimsuit, and it is snowing outside the window, you can infer thatshe is about to go on vacation.Try It Read the following paragraph.Amanda sat wide-eyed in her seat and waited for the bus to pull out ofthe station. It wasn’t an ordinary station, nor was it an ordinary bus. Thisbus could travel on land, in water, in air, and even in outer space. Amandahad read about vehicles like this and had been thrilled to sign up for a tourso she could experience it. “It’s a little scary,” her friend Kris had told herafter he came back from the tour he’d taken a few months earlier.Discuss What sort of person is Amanda? Underline the parts of the textthat support your inference.Read on, looking for more clues to support your inference about Amanda.Amanda wasn’t the least bit concerned about that. The tour wasadvertised as “the adventure of a lifetime,” and Amanda had no doubt itwould be. She could hardly contain her excitement.Discuss How does Amanda feel about the tour? How do you know?Underline words and phrases that help you know how she’s feeling.As you read, record your answers about drawing and supportinginferences on the Close Reading Worksheet on page 257.6  Lesson 1  •  FictionDuplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLCCC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 6 4/22/13 5:19 PM
  • 6. Practice the SkillSecond Read Story Elements: PlotThe plot of a story is the series of episodes that move the story from start tofinish. These episodes can be ordinary, true-to-life events or fantastic events thatturn reality upside down. In many works of fiction, the plot unfolds in five parts.• Exposition: the story’s beginning, where thecharacters and setting are presented• Rising action: the point where the story’s mainproblem or conflict is introduced•  Climax: the turning point, which may involvegreat physical danger or strong emotions•  Falling action: the point where the story beginsto wind down• Resolution: the story’s end, where conflicts areresolved and loose ends are tied upTry It Read this very short story, and think about what happens.My brother and I landed on Nyancia by accident when our spaceshipran out of fuel. The planet Nyancia wasn’t on any star chart because it hadonly recently been discovered. It was dark and cold when we landed. Wewere frightened and nearly freezing, but we searched for something touse as fuel. After about an hour, we discovered a tunnel in the rock. Muchto our surprise, a different world was on the other side: bright, warm, andcolorful! We made friends in Nyancia, and they eventually helped us getback home. But first, we stayed awhile to get to know these kind peopleand their beautiful planet.Discuss What is the story’s conflict? Is it resolved? How well does this storyfollow the five-part plot structure? Reread the story, and box andlabel each part: E for Exposition, RA for Rising Action, C for Climax,FA for Falling Action, and R for Resolution.As you read, complete the Plot Sequence Chart on page 258.Aaron’s Future Friend 7Duplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLCCC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 7 4/22/13 5:19 PM
  • 7. Why did Aaron mostlikely keep the Icealiaguide even though hehad never thought aboutgoing there?Who are the characters,and what is the setting ofthe story? What do youknow about them? Recordyour answers underExposition on the PlotSequence Chart.How would you describeAaron? Underline cluesthat support your answer.Aaron Eisely got the news on Friday afternoon by what hisgeneration calls “the AM” (Ancient Mail). It was a printed letter in anenvelope, hand stamped by the Bellmont postmaster and deliveredby robot express. “It’s from TTEP!” he cried out, thrilled, although nota soul was around to hear him. He tore open the envelope, and sureenough, it was a welcome letter to new members. “Congratulations,time traveler!” it read. “You have been selected for membership inthe Time Traveler’s Exchange Program (TTEP). As a new member,you have been awarded an opportunity to travel in time and spaceto Icealia for the upcoming school year. Once we receive your signedletter of acceptance, travel to Icealia will be arranged immediately.Welcome to TTEP, and happy travels in time!”He had done it. Although the competition was admittedly fierce,he had created a first-class video application that had earned him hisspot in TTEP. Aaron had wanted to time travel for as long as he couldremember. He had watched every vidclip he could get his hands onabout time travel, and he had read everything he could find on thetopic—and Aaron was an avid reader.But . . . Icealia? He had never thought of bare, lonely Icealia as apotential destination. Of all the worlds in the galaxy he could visit,past and present, Icealia was so desolate that it had never crossed hismind. Now, though, his mind was racing like a comet. He logged on tohis reader and pulled up a guide about Icealia that he had read severalyears ago and stored in the hard memory, and began reading.123Aaron’s Future FriendPurpose for ReadingRead along with your teacher. Each time, read for a different purpose.First Read Focus on drawing and supporting inferences.Second Read Focus on how the plot unfolds.Third Read Focus on thinking critically about the story.8  Lesson 1  •  FictionDuplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLCCC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 8 4/22/13 5:19 PM
  • 8. How would you describethe rising action in thispart of the story? Recordyour answer on the PlotSequence Chart.How does the author buildsuspense in this part ofthe story?How does Aaron feelabout his upcoming trip?Underline the parts of thetext that support yourinference.“Icealia is one of the most remote worlds in the known universe,”Aaron read. “Found light-years from Earth, the primary Icealiancivilization exists seven centuries in the future. Communication isaccomplished through a complex system of coding, rather than formalspoken or written language. Because most communication is doneremotely, Icealians have very little contact with one another and haveadjusted to a solitary existence. Humans have learned much from theIcealians about remote communication and technology.”Aaron never even considered rejecting the offer. He sent off hisletter of acceptance and contacted the TTEP office for his interview.Aaron would travel by space-time ship, traveling at sublight speed,making one short stop in Lunaria, then arriving at the Icealia landportten days, two hours, and twenty-three minutes after his departure fromEarth. The year of his arrival would be 2915.Once he arrived, his strict directions were to log in at thelandport with his name, his TTEP travel number, and his destinationcoordinates. He would then receive a card with driving directionswritten in code. His mind spun.“Don’t worry if you can’t read the directions,” Ms. Vanelli fromthe TTEP office explained to him. “Just take the card and feed it intothe slot by the tramport door. The card will signal the tram doors toopen and permit you to enter, then program the tram to deliver youdirectly to Hiz’s homeport. If you follow the directions, then there reallyshouldn’t be a problem.” Hiz would be Aaron’s Icealian host in theTTEP program.Aaron still felt doubtful. “But . . . what if the doors don’t open,or what if the card gets stuck in the slot, or what if anything like thathappens—then what?” he asked nervously.45678Aaron’s Future Friend 9Duplicatinganypartofthisbookisprohibitedbylaw.©2014TriumphLearning,LLCCC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 9 4/22/13 5:19 PM
  • 9. How does the risingaction continue in thispart of the story? Recordyour answers on the PlotSequence Chart.Why do you think thenarrator calls Hiz “alien inmind”?How is Hiz’s personalitydifferent from what Aaronexpected? Underline thedetails that support youranswer.“And . . . I should still be able to communicate with Hiz, though,right, if I need to?”“You can code him as soon as you land and exit the tramport. Let’sget you set up with your codigraph, so you’ll have time to familiarizeyourself with it before you leave. The device won’t be functional untilyou land in Icealia, but you will be able to see how it works, how toreceive and submit code, and that sort of thing. How fluent are you atcoding?”“I have been getting better at it over time,” Aaron replied.“Good, because Hiz won’t likely be completely fluent in English.Although he’s studied our language, without actually speaking it aloudand communicating with another English speaker, his pronunciation isunlikely to be very understandable.”Aaron made a vow to practice coding at every opportunity right upto the day he left—and that day came quickly. For the next six weeks,Aaron bustled around the house getting ready to enter LearningPort361X, where he would log in to his classroom, code in his assignments,and never speak a word to his teacher or classmates. For the next ninemonths, Aaron’s sole companion would be Hiz Handler, a boy whoseholographic images looked like those of any ordinary boy. However,Hiz would be a puzzle to figure out. Alien in mind but not in form, Hizwould be Aaron’s only guide in his future life.As Aaron had expected, when he finally arrived on Icealia, he foundHiz to be rather mysterious. As unused to company as Hiz must havebeen, he greeted Aaron warmly and extended his hand. Aaron notedthat Hiz was also smaller than expected. He smiled and listened whenAaron spoke. He asked how Aaron enjoyed his trip and whether hehad any trouble at the tramport. Most surprisingly, however, Hiz wascompassionate, which Aaron learned once they started coding.9101112131410  Lesson 1  •  FictionCC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 10 4/22/13 5:19 PM
  • 10. Describe the rising actionon this page. Recordyour answers on the PlotSequence Chart.Why is Aaron surprisedthat Hiz has pictures onhis wall?Why does Hiz cry when hesees images of Aloysius?Underline the details thatsupport your answer.Curious, Aaron thought, he has developed the ability to care aboutothers, although he’s been alone since he was a child.Hiz showed Aaron around his homeport, completely unfazed bythe fact that it was cluttered and unkempt. Strange tools and straypieces of metal covered every table and chair in sight. Hiz’s profile inthe TTEP program had explained that he was a builder, so Aaron hadan idea that he’d find something like this. But the funniest thing wasthat amid the clutter of metal and electronics, images of other Icealianswere projected on the walls. The images were of Hiz’s family andfriends, his classmates and teachers—all the people Hiz coded withevery day but never spent time with in real life.The mind works more efficiently alone, Hiz told Aaron in code,when thoughts are allowed to flow freely, without interruption, inone continuous stream. Aaron stared at the pictures, trying to digestthem. He wondered how Hiz felt about these people he had chosen tocommemorate.1He wondered if they shared secrets and coded abouttheir dreams.“Share?” Aaron asked in English. “I have holos to share with you.”Aaron pointed to the images on Hiz’s wall, and then he pulled upholograms from his reader—images of his mother, his father, his sisterCassidy, and his dog, Aloysius.“My family,” Aaron explained, pointing again to Hiz’s family,projected on the walls. When Hiz saw the images of Aloysius andAaron playing together, tears welled up in his eyes.Aaron was perplexed, and so for a few minutes, he said nothing.He watched Hiz stare longingly at the hologram. My best friend, Aaronfinally coded. His name’s Aloysius, and we play together. I talk to him.I know he understands me.Hiz continued to stare at Aloysius, and he touched the imagewistfully. He coded, There are no animals in Icealia. They’ve beenextinct for a long time.1commemorate to honor the memory of someone15161718192021Aaron’s Future Friend 11CC13_ELA_G6_SE_L01_005-028.indd 11 4/22/13 5:19 PM

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