The Clothing Bank - Poverty stoplight

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The poverty stoplight case study by the Clothing Bank

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The Clothing Bank - Poverty stoplight

  1. 1. 4. Practical Trading Experience 5. Coaching & Mentoring 6. Performance Management 1. Recruit Right Candidate 2. Practical Teaching Methods 3. Work Experience 7.Sustainability Holistic Development Model
  2. 2. IndividualCollective Interior ExteriorCollectiveIndividual Greater Depth (Conscience) Greater Complexity (Energetic & Material) Interior Exterior Intention Culture System Behavior Why doesn’t she have teeth?
  3. 3. IndividualCollective Interior ExteriorCollectiveIndividual Greater Depth (Conscience) Greater Complexity (Energetic & Material) Interior Exterior Why doesn’t she have teeth? Is she afraid”? Does she want teeth? Does her community value teeth? Is it OK not to have teeth? Is there a Dental Clinic nearby? Is it affordable? Does she visit the dentist? Does she brush her teeth? Does she eat well? Intention Culture System Behavior
  4. 4. IndividualCollective Interior ExteriorCollectiveIndividual greater Depth (Conscience) greater Complexity (Energetic & Material) Interior Exterior Why doesn’t she have money? Does she want to learn new skills? Does she want to double her income? Community support? Is progress appreciated? Does she have access to loans? Is there a market? Does she have transportation? Does she sell enough tortillas? Does she have enough clients? Intention Culture System Behavior
  5. 5. • Poor families are NOT an empty bottle that must be filled, or ball that must be inflated • Poor families have trapped potential and energy that must be unleashed Premise: Wealth is Trapped within Families
  6. 6. Three Types of PovertyPOVERTYININCOME • Learn how to generate income above the national poverty line • Maintain stable employment POVERTYINQUALITYOFLIFE • Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) • Extreme Poverty • Hunger • Education • Gender Equality • Maternal Health • Roads • Housing • Public Services POVERTYINLAND-TITLEROOTS • Massive Land Title Drives • Access to Credits • Avoid Migration • Stop Land Invasions • Mystery of Capital
  7. 7. Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Community Change (We and Them) Greater Self Esteem (I and We) Family Change (We) Self Esteem (I) Behavioural Change (I) Internal Motivation (I)
  8. 8. Motivation Knowledge Personal “I” I want to do it and I believe I can Is it worth it? Have I seen someone who is like me succeed? - relevant role models Am I passionate about it? I can do it as I have the knowledge and skill Can I do it? Do I have the knowledge and skill? Develop training programmes to re-ignite learning and build self esteem Early “I can” moments Group “We Declare my intent to others, peer pressure, group support Set goals – share them Declare your intent to family and friends Ask for help & support Can others help me do it? Work in groups Seek more knowledge Learn from others, Try out alternatives, Find what works for you – learn adjust Structural “Them” How do I get others, things to motivate me? Join others on the same journey Self Help Groups with experts Incentive schemes Consequences for inaction Do things allow me to do it? Systems and processes Organisation and planning Access to finance Access to market Access to infrastructure Access to tools – internet, computer Access to opportunities, networks Change Models need to be Multi-Dimensional
  9. 9. Motivation Knowledge Personal “I” I want do it and I believe I can Recruitment tools and techniques – looking for factors that work against change Emotional readiness – how stuck am I? Internal Locus I can do it as I have the knowledge and skill Recruitment tools assess for natural acumen and interest Develop training programmes to re-ignite learning and build self esteem Early “I can” moments through practical trading experience Group “We Declare my intent to others, peer pressure, group support Recruit in small groups-build group trust and identity Poverty Stoplight – clear line of sight and includes whole family Group coaching - groups become strong support system Can others help me do it? Training programmes that are practical, outcomes based, relevant and develop the whole person Practical trading experience – “I can” moments sharing success and obstacles in group Work experience – building team spirit Coaching and mentoring Structural “Them” How do I get others, things to motivate me? Coaching, mentoring Poverty stoplight incorporated into coaching and mentoring Performance management – rewards and consequences Do things allow me to do it? Access to clothing, to start up capital Micro franchise opportunities Systems and processes entrenched through mentoring- recordkeeping Computer training – access to business centre Connection to networks and opportunities “This allows for analysis and reflection”
  10. 10. How do we know if our programmes are successful? If they are actually moving the needle of transformation? Can we define what “not poor” means? We need to contrast poverty with non-poverty and then take action to address the difference IMPACT!!!!
  11. 11. What is the Poverty Stoplight Tool? Poverty Stoplight is a self-evaluation visual survey tool. It allows each low-income person to measure, take stock of, and plan how to resolve the poverty-related problems that affect his/her family. Poverty does not affect families uniformly. Each family is unique, therefore each solution will be unique. Creates clear line of sight and acts as a powerful personal goal setting tool.
  12. 12. Elements of Poverty Stoplight Tool Six poverty dimensions • Income & Employment • Health & Environment • Housing & Infrastructure • Education & Culture • Organisation & Participation • Self-Awareness & Motivation 50 indicators Three conditions for each poverty indicator  Very poor (red)  Poor (orange/amber)  Not poor (green)
  13. 13. Definitions of Poverty – who decides what it means to “progress out of poverty”?
  14. 14. How Does it Work? Family, with trained facilitator performs a self assessment at beginning of programme (during volunteer stage) to record baseline Family discusses results and sets targets and practical action plans for each indicator Family discusses who can help them achieve their goal and starts to engage friends, family, community, role models Progress against plan is measured regularly (coaching, mentoring, rewards) and integrated into intervention programme. Formally measured every 12 months and results published Organisation able to report on “real” impact results. Have our beneficiaries successfully eradicated poverty in their lives? If not what do they/we need to do differently?
  15. 15. Example: A Baseline Profile Report - Individual
  16. 16. Example: A Baseline Profile Report - Group
  17. 17. Considerations Context specific? e.g. country / region - SA different to Paraguay Appropriateness of definitions? e.g. possible to standardise for a sector Weighting of various indicators? e.g. income more important than household infrastructure Limitations? e.g. metropolitan vs rural area
  18. 18. - Herramienta para Plan de Progreso Familiar y Comunitario Income/earnings above the poverty line Stable employment and income sources Access to credit facilities Family savings Personal identification 22% 13% 9% 0% 100% 39% 52% 70% 35% 0% 39% 35% 22% 65% 0% Income and Employment - Group 1402 Not Poor Poor Very Poor
  19. 19. Mapping Examples from Paraguay
  20. 20. The Clothing Bank Results Baseline: Group 1402 Poverty Stoplight
  21. 21. Income/earnings above the poverty line Stable employment and income sources Access to credit facilities Family savings Personal identification 22% 13% 9% 0% 100% 39% 52% 70% 35% 0% 39% 35% 22% 65% 0% Income and Employment - Group 1402 Not Poor Poor Very Poor • 78% of household income below R5000 • Only 13% of households have a stable income and don’t depend on grants • 70% have access to credit but have problems paying off debts • 100% have savings of less than R5000
  22. 22. • 100% have access to safe drinking water • 25% have access to a clinic but limited access to chronic medication • 61% have poor nutrition, 4% go to sleep hungry • 43% do not practice family planning or look after their sexual health • 39% say both parents are not actively involved and mother not able to fulfil all children's needs • 56% live in a polluted environment – despite having garbage disposal • 43% have at least 1 member addict in family which affects family negatively-13% have more than 1 family membner where drinking is prioritised over food
  23. 23. • 34% do not have a well insulated safe home structure • 100% have proper sanitation and sewerage – poo wars!!! • 65% do not have separate bedrooms for adults and children • 57% have limited/old furniture and household utensils • 26% has limited access to safe, reliable, affordable transport, 57% there is access but affordability is an issue • 52% spend between 1-2 hours commuting to work with multiple transfers • 26% have suffered an act of violence in last 6 months and 39% in the last year
  24. 24. • 48% of children under 18 not attending school • 57% say there is some in household with limited knowledge to generate income, 17% say none of family know how to run a business • 87% do none or very limited planning • 70% below to strong social networks • 48% of children do not have adequate school supplies or transport • 57% have access to television, radio, cellphone and internet • 96% have limited entertainment and leisure opportunities • 78% have limited interest in cultural activities • 87% respect other cultures
  25. 25. • 57% have limited access to self help groups • 61% believe they have limited ability to participate in public sector or use it to solve problems • 83% believe the family is good at solving problems in a constructive and positive way • 77% are registered to vote
  26. 26. • 65% set goals and have are excited about their future • 61% have high confidence and self esteem • 87% have high moral values and don’t break the law and are not easily influenced • 78% have good self awareness and are capable of expressing emotions • 74% say no women experience violence or they act quickly and not afraid to speak out • 57% have households have limited entrepreneurial spirit
  27. 27. Thank You
  28. 28. Contact Details www.theclothingbank.org.za Tracey Chambers traceychambers@theclothingbank.org.za Laura Bergh blbergh@iafrica.com

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