Making csi matter   navigating development funding - p netshipale
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  • 1. DSD PRIORITIES AND POLICY ON FINANCIAL AWARDS TO SERVICE PROVIDERS 25 MAY 2011
  • 2. Presentation Outline
    • Introduction
    • The NPO sector in SA
    • Distribution of NPO sector
    • DSD Priorities
    • Why review the Policy- Challenges
    • Outcomes
    • Outline of the policy
    • Implementation of the policy
    • Conclusion
  • 3.
    • Introduction
    05/25/11
    • Social development’s business is to drive social change designed to promote the well-being of the population as a whole in conjunction with a dynamic process of economic development.
    • Hence our vision is to “…build a caring and integrated system of social development services that facilitates human development and improves the quality of life”.
    • Social welfare deficits have thus far negatively impacted upon the development pursuits of South Africans – services to the needy remain historically acute.
    • In the absence of the social grants that millions of South Africans receive, the consequences would have been extremely perilous
  • 4.
    • Introduction (2)
    05/25/11
    • Over the past 17 years, social enterprises have emerged out of broad-based community development strategies involving citizens, the voluntary sector, businesses, learning institutions, and other partners.
    • These enterprises provide a flexible and sustainable tool that can help communities to achieve their own objectives, such as:
      • stimulating job creation and skills development;
      • enhancing community capacity for social supports
      • supporting economic growth and neighborhood revitalization; and
      • mobilising disadvantaged groups
  • 5. Introduction (3)
    • Community structures are generally organized around three realms, the government, business and nonprofit sectors
    • Like a three-legged stool, all three sectors must be present, and working together to achieve balance and stability in a country
    • The rapid growth of the role of the voluntary sector in the provision of social services in the last two decades of the twentieth century became a major social policy as well as political and ideological issue in the country
    • Civil society Organizations are important in community development, community empowerment and the delivery of social services and this development put the civil society organizations or voluntary sector on the agenda of service delivery improvement.
  • 6. Introduction (4)
    • NPO sector has been in existent for a long period in the country and internationally. Even before the 1994, NPO were the key in the struggle against apartheid
    • Post apartheid NPO’s are still a key in the delivery of social services. NPOs are therefore a vehicle in which social services in the communities are delivered to the communities, especially the poor rural communities
    • Little had been known about the size and scope of the civil society organizations in the country until the department passed an Act that compels civil society organizations to register as NPOs
    • DSD is responsible for the administration of the NPO Act and creating of enabling environment for all NPOs in the country
  • 7. NPO registration
    • 2010/2011 financial year (April 2010 to31 st March 2011) the Department received 15 232 new applications
    • of that 10 238 organisations were eventually registered
    • 4 723 did not met the registration requirements.
    • This translate to 69% registration compliance by organizations.
    • An increase of 6% from 2009/2011
    • This represent an increase of 14% in the NPO register.
    • 97% of registered NPOs during this period were Voluntary associations, while the remaining 3% were shared between Section 21 (2%) and Trust with (1%)
  • 8. Distribution( types)
  • 9. Provincial Distribution Province Number of NPOs Eastern Cape 1041 Free State 453 Gauteng 3353 Kwazulu Natal 1927 Limpopo 1234 Mpumalanga 583 North West 556 Northern Cape 250 Western Cape 1145 Total 10542
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. NPO registered per sector CLASSIFICATION Total number Percentage Social Services 26 199 34% Development and Housing 15 797 21% Religion 8 839 12% Health 8 723 11% Education and Research 8 655 11% Culture and Recreation 4 069 5% Law, Advocacy, and Politics 1 605 2% Environment 918 1% Philanthropic Intermediaries and Voluntarism Promotion 912 1% Business and Professional Associations, Unions 402 0.5 % International 53 0,06% Not elsewhere classified 3 - OVERALL 76 175
  • 13. Provincial Distribution
  • 14. Funding of non profit organisations
    • Treasury in its 2005/06 – 2011/12 Provincial Budget and Expenditure Review document published, identifies the expanding of social welfare services, and building of stronger partnerships with NPOs as one of the priories that inform the provincial share of revenues
    • DSD identified a number of gaps through the internal Desktop Analysis and interaction with service providers and Provinces
  • 15. DSD PRIORITIES “AREAS OF CSI AND NPO FUNDING” 05/25/11
  • 16. Department’s Priorities Welfare Services Improvement Community Development Social Policy Coordination and Research Comprehensive Social Security Strengthening of the NGO Sector Food Security Social Protection Agenda
  • 17. WELFARE SERVICE IMPROVEMENT (1)
    • Sector Capacity
    • Human resources capacity in the welfare services field is currently inadequate to address the critical social development needs of the country ( social worker, ASW, CDP, ACP)
      • The emphasis in this area will be on enhancement of sector capacity in terms of bolstering the presence of social services professionals on the ground, unblocking service delivery issues related to the application of the legislation, training, social infrastructure and implementation support to delivery partners.
    05/25/11
  • 18. WELFARE SERVICES IMPROVEMENT (2)
    • A reduction in substance abuse
    • The Department of Social Development lead campaigns that seek to reduce the abuse of drugs and rehabilitate and integrate drug users to become addiction-free and productive members of society
      • social change strategies to change the current unhealthy use of substances including alcohol in South Africa.
      • This campaign will oversee policy and legislative changes that will regulate the manner in which alcoholic products are marketed and distributed.
    05/25/11
  • 19. WELFARE SERVICES IMPROVEMENT (3)
    • Tackling of social crime
    • Despite our progress and ‘best practice’ policies our country still has high levels of social crime particularly violence against women and children
    • Our Victim Empowerment Programmes and social crime prevention strategies are delivered in partnership with civil society organisations and partner government departments.
    • We need to increase the approaches
    05/25/11
  • 20. WELFARE SERVICE IMPROVEMENT (4)
    • Promotion and establishment of ECDs
    • The Department continue to accelerate the Early Childhood Development Programme to ensure that every child is given a good start early in life
    • The number of children in Early Childhood Development sites subsidized by the Department of Social Development has increased from 270,096 in 2005 to 443,545 in 2011.
      • A need to partner with civil society organisations to accelerate the efforts
    05/25/11
  • 21. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
    • Social mobilization and facilitation
    • The Department of Social Development continues to develop and implement an array of programmes that do not only protect South Africans against poverty, but also promote investment in building and strengthening community and household’s capacity towards self-reliance
      • Community projects , capacity of community structure
    • Youth and women to ensure that they are provided with appropriate support to unleash their potential to achieve sustainable livelihoods. This collective effort will certainly create solidarity; promote social change and justice as part of nation building
      • Youth and women capacity & skills and economic opportunities
    05/25/11
  • 22. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (2)
    • Social mobilization and facilitation
    • The Department will further place more emphasis on repositioning its community development and focus on Community mobilisation with other departments
    05/25/11
  • 23. PROVISION OF COMPREHENSIVE SOCIAL SECURITY
    • Extending the reach of social assistance to the poor
    • The mainstay of our contribution to reduce income poverty remains in our social assistance programmes.
    • The number of poor households in receipt of social grants reached a high of 15 million by January 2011
    • We will research the viability of revising the means tests for all the grant types so that more people who need assistance may be reached
    • The Department will ensure that our retirement systems is more responsive to the needs of all working people.
    05/25/11
  • 24. PROVISION OF COMPREHENSIVE SOCIAL SECURITY (2)
    • Ensuring access and integrity in the Social Security
    • The Department has established a Tribunal to investigate and adjudicate on all the social grants appeals and it is now establishing the Inspectorate to examine and maintain the integrity of the social security framework and systems.
    05/25/11
  • 25. STRENGTHENING OF THE NGO SECTOR
    • Improving governance and the turn around time for the registration of NPOs
    • Working together with various sections of our society remains a key strategic anchor for the Department of Social Development and is a necessary step in ensuring that social development goals are realised.
    • The Department will continue to lead in the registration and strengthening of civil society organisations that support communities in service delivery and broadly on development issues.
      • Capacity building of organisations
      • Monitoring of organisations
    05/25/11
  • 26. STRENGTHENING OF THE NGO SECTOR (2)
    • Improving governance and the turn around time for the registration of NPOs
    • The Department will improve its Information Technology Systems and publish lists of organisations that have opted to demonstrate their willingness to be accountable on resources raised and allocated by government - thereby increasing their credibility and indeed marketability.
    • More emphasis will be on education through consultative workshops and information to the public and indeed other agencies in government on the NPO registration system as stipulated in the NPO Act of 1998.
    05/25/11
  • 27. FOOD SECURITY
    • Zero hunger
    • DSD is working towards further improvements of the people of South Africa’s food security through linking the provision of social assistance to programmes that will facilitate the integration of food production to the consumption of healthy food by poor South Africans. This will be done in partnership with partner departments such as Rural Development and Agriculture
    • Our participation in this programme loosely termed “the Zero Hunger Programme” as is the case in Brazil; has the potential to significantly change the manner food is produced and distributed in South Africa.
    05/25/11
  • 28. SOCIAL POLICY COORDINATION AND RESEARCH
    • Population Development
    • Implement research, capacity building programs and improve communication to strengthen implementation of the population policy, particularly in support of the local government
    • Place more emphasis on gender equity, equality and the empowerment of women and youth as well as health concerns with demographic consequences (HIV/Aids)
    • Play a progressive role in international population affairs in the build up to the 20 year review of the International Conference on Population and Development (2014).
    05/25/11
  • 29. SOCIAL POLICY COORDINATION AND RESEARCH (2)
    • Evidence based policy development
    • Provide strategic guidance on social policy development, coordination and guidance.
    • Deepen social policy discourse and evidence based policy making
    • Contribute towards a fight against poverty through research and policy development
    • Driving the Department’s social policy analysis thrust in support of the African agenda
    05/25/11
  • 30. ROLES OF CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANISATIONS
    • Community structures are generally organized around three realms, the government, business and nonprofit sectors
    • Like a three-legged stool, all three sectors must be present, and working together to achieve balance and stability in a country
    • The rapid growth of the role of the voluntary sector in the provision of social services in the last two decades of the twentieth century became a major social policy as well as political and ideological issue in the country
    • Civil society Organizations are important in community development, community empowerment and the delivery of social services and this development put the civil society organizations or voluntary sector on the agenda of service delivery improvement.
  • 31. Matrix of Challenges
  • 32. Challenges
    • Uniformity in NPO funding in the DSD sector ( National Branches & Provinces)
    • Delays in NPO funding in provinces
    • National roles in the coordination of the sector NPO funding
    • Poor Monitoring and evaluation and reporting systems
    • Non-Compliance of NPOs to the NPO Act
    • Implementation of the new pieces of legislation
    • Disparities in the NPO funding
    • Disparities among the NPOs
  • 33. Outline of the Policy (1)
    • The thrust of the reviewed Policy hinges on the approach that DSD takes charge in establishing partnerships with NPOs
    • Build around establishing partnerships as a form of financing NPOs for sustainable service delivery
    • It seeks to position the DSD to assume its leadership position towards effective management of financing services delivered by the NPOs within the social development sector
    • The following are key areas that have been introduced to address challenges or gaps in the implementation of the current policy:
      • Transformation
      • Partnerships
      • Roles and responsibilities
      • New approach of Financing ( Programme Funding)
      • Implementation of the Policy
  • 34. Intended Outcome
    • Transformation of civil society organizations and NPO
    • Uniformity
    • Empowerment
    • Partnerships establishment
    • Better financial management
    • Effective and efficient service delivery
    • Synchronization with new legislations
  • 35. Outline of the Policy
    • Transformation:
    • Focus on empowerment of emerging NPOs
    • Provision of support to such organisations to be responsive to the Policy
    • Department to take leadership in financing of NPOs
    • Funded NPO to implement transformation
    • The Department to monitor transformation
  • 36. Outline of the Policy (2)
    • Partnerships:
    • The policy recognizes the significance of partnerships and strives to improve and clarify relationship between DSD and the NPO sector
    • Strengthening of communication
    • Clarification of roles and responsibilities of DSD and NPO sector
    • Effective management of financing services delivered by the NPOs within the social development sector
  • 37. Outline of the Policy (3)
    • Financing:
    • In order to address the challenges identified with respect to the funding of the statutory services, this chapter proposes a move from subsidisation to programme financing in accordance to national norms and standards and costing models to ensure uniformity
    • Financing based on departmental priorities and affordability
    • Financing based on identified needs and availability of financial resources
    • Introduction of call for proposals
    • The policy proposes NPO financing time lines linked to MTEF and the guidelines
    • Streamline budget to avoid double dipping
  • 38. Outline of the Policy (5)
    • Implementation of the Policy:
    • The policy proposes
      • The introduction of the NPO financing guidelines
      • The role of national and provincial department ( coordination)
      • Implementation of one PFA across the Departments
      • Implementation of new legislations ,norms and standards and Costing models
      • Integrated Service Delivery approach
  • 39. NPO Guideline
    • Provide guidance to National and Provinces on NPO funding
    • Provide a practical processes and steps for NPO funding
    • Standardize NPO funding processes to uniformity in the sector
    • To define capacity for the management of NPO funding
    • To strengthen NPO management in the sector
    • To strengthen NPO monitoring and reporting
    • To integrate NPO funding into the MTEF cycle
  • 40. Conclusion
    • Consultation with the civil society organisations to begin to ensure buy-in and participation
    • Finalisation of the costing models
    • creation of capacity at all spheres of government
    • Strengthening of monitoring and evaluation systems
    • Capacity building or training of provinces on guideline (call for proposal approach) where necessary
    • Implementation for next year
  • 41. Thank you