Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Halloween
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Halloween

142
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
142
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Halloween
  • 2. costumes OBVIOUS SIMILARITIES suggest at least a notional link between the present-day Halloween custom of wearing costumes and trick-ortreating on October 31 and the Medieval practices of "mumming" and "ginga_souling" on the eves of All Saints Day (November 1) and All Souls Day (November 2). Mumming took the form of wearing costumes, chanting, singing, play-acting, and general mischief making, while souling entailed going door to door and offering prayers for the dead in exchange for treats, particularly "soul cakes." http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/halloween/a/Why-Do-WeWear-Costumes-Halloween.htm
  • 3. Candy ● Historically, the practice of giving out candy because in ancient Rome people would give out sweets http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_do_people_give_out_candy_on_Halloween#slide9 Nowadays, candy is given out to ward off tricks and vandalism done by children if they don’t get treats. This vandalism can be a simple toilet papering of the persons house, throwing eggs, to more violent actions like, breaking windows or starting fires.
  • 4. ck O’lanterns? Ja THE NAME "jack-o'-lantern" is of British origin and dates from the 17th century, when it literally meant "man with a lantern" "a lantern made by scooping out the inside of a turnip, carving the shell into a rude representation of the human face, and placing a lighted candle inside it." http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/halloween/a/Why-Do-WeCarve-Pumpkins-On-Halloween.htm
  • 5. Facts Trick-or-treaters get Halloween is a $7 billion enough candy to add enterprise, making up 8 about 3 pounds to their percent of all U.S. sweets weight. The thousands of sales. It's a huge boost for calories of fat and sugar the economy before the may taste good, but they holiday season begins in can do a lot of damage. earnest. We spend more Fortunately, most young than $2 billion on costumes people can eat anything nationwide. they want and get away with it. http://www.diamondbackonline. com/opinion/article_861167b2-3cfa-11e3-8c60001a4bcf6878.html
  • 6. Pet costumes Come on, guys. Look at that number. $330 million on pet costumes. That’s about one-sixth of the money spent on human costumes. That money could be used on just about anything else — we could help the poor, pay for education, support worthwhile charities. But we choose pet costumes.
  • 7. Best costumes
  • 8. vies/cartoons Mo Nothing makes us feel like kids again more than Halloween. All of our greatest memories associated with the spooky holiday conjure up snapshots of crafty costumes and cavityinducing treats. In the days leading up to Halloween, creepy cartoons always set the mood with spine-tingling tales and famous animated characters channeling the dark side.
  • 9. Pumpkins
  • 10. an influence Christi Samhain was later transformed as Christian leaders co-opted pagan holidays. In the seventh century Pope Boniface IV decreed November 1 All Saints' Day, or All Hallows' Day. The night before Samhain continued to be observed with bonfires, costumes, and parades, though under a new name: All Hallows' Eve— later "Halloween."
  • 11. $$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$ cooler fall weather and a tepid economy may put a slight chill on this year's celebrations. Almost 158 million consumers will take part in Halloween activities this year, down a bit from 2012's 170 million people, which was the high mark in the decade since the survey began. The average person will spend a bit less this year too, the survey found: a total of $75.03 on decorations, costumes, and candy, down from $79.82 last year. Total expenditures for the holiday should reach $6.9 billion, similar to the 2011 levels but down from a spike to some $8 billion last year.
  • 12. video
  • 13. The End http://www.diamondbackonline. com/opinion/article_861167b2-3cfa-11e3-8c60001a4bcf6878.html http://urbanlegends.about. com/od/halloween/a/Why-Do-We-CarvePumpkins-On-Halloween.htm http://wiki.answers. com/Q/Why_do_people_give_o ut_candy_on_Halloween#slide9
  • 14. http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/halloween/a/Why-DoWe-Wear-Costumes-Halloween.htm http://www.diamondbackonline. com/opinion/article_861167b2-3cfa-11e38c60-001a4bcf6878.html http://urbanlegends.about. com/od/halloween/a/Why-Do-We-CarvePumpkins-On-Halloween.htm