• By: Trent Southerland
• Georgia is the site of a rich geologic history, covering at  least 1 billion years.• The state can be divided into five ...
I collected samplesfrom Piedmont andValley and Ridgeregions.
• Metamorphic rocks form by applying  heat, pressure, and/or chemically active fluids to  preexisting igneous, sedimentary...
Sample #1
• This rock appears dull  and displays excellent  rock cleavage (Two  pieces came off while  I was taking a  picture!). I ...
• Sedimentary rocks are created from weathering of  preexisting rocks.• Three categories of sedimentary rocks are recogniz...
I think this rock is jasper, a type of chert. It is acompact, hard, chemical sedimentary rock and has a reddishtint (my ca...
Sample #4
• Igneous rocks are derived from magma that cools and  solidifies.• Extrusive igneous rocks form when lava solidifies on t...
Sample #5
• Pamela J. W. Gore (2007, Jan 7). Geologic History of  Georgia: Overview. Retrieved from  http://www.georgiaencyclopedia....
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Field assignment part 1

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Field assignment part 1

  1. 1. • By: Trent Southerland
  2. 2. • Georgia is the site of a rich geologic history, covering at least 1 billion years.• The state can be divided into five regions or provinces: Coastal Plain, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau.• A large percentage of Georgia’s wealth is derived from geological resources such as marble, granite, and kaolin.• Georgia’s geology is some of the most varied and interesting terrain, with each region having its own distinctive look, rock types, and geological history.
  3. 3. I collected samplesfrom Piedmont andValley and Ridgeregions.
  4. 4. • Metamorphic rocks form by applying heat, pressure, and/or chemically active fluids to preexisting igneous, sedimentary, and other metamorphic rocks.• An example of a foliated metamorphic rock is slate. Slate generally appears dull and displays an admirable rock cleavage.• An example of a non-foliated metamorphic rock is marble. Marble is composed basically of the mineral calcite. Marble is fairly malleable, allowing it to be used to create monuments such as the Taj Mahal.
  5. 5. Sample #1
  6. 6. • This rock appears dull and displays excellent rock cleavage (Two pieces came off while I was taking a picture!). I believe this rock is slate, a foliated metamorphic rock.
  7. 7. • Sedimentary rocks are created from weathering of preexisting rocks.• Three categories of sedimentary rocks are recognized: detrital, chemical, and organic.• Detrital sedimentary rocks are derived from both mechanical and chemical weathering.• Chemical sedimentary rocks are produced by chemical weathering (inorganic or biologic processes).• Organic sedimentary rocks are created from undecayed plant structures such as leaves, bark, and wood.
  8. 8. I think this rock is jasper, a type of chert. It is acompact, hard, chemical sedimentary rock and has a reddishtint (my camera doesn’t pick up the red very well). Sample #3
  9. 9. Sample #4
  10. 10. • Igneous rocks are derived from magma that cools and solidifies.• Extrusive igneous rocks form when lava solidifies on the surface.• Intrusive igneous rocks are created by magma that crystalizes beneath the Earth’s surface.• Crystallization is the process of ions from cooling magma arranging themselves into orderly patterns. The slower the cooling the larger the crystals.• The mineral composition of an igneous rock is directly tied to the chemical makeup of the parent magma and the type of crystallization.
  11. 11. Sample #5
  12. 12. • Pamela J. W. Gore (2007, Jan 7). Geologic History of Georgia: Overview. Retrieved from http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?path= /ScienceMedicine/EarthSciences/GeologicalProvinces&id =h-3510• William J. Frazier (2007, Jan 7). Geologic Regions of Georgia: Overview. Retrieved from http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?path= /ScienceMedicine/EarthSciences/GeologicalProvinces&id =h-1159• Edward J. Tarbuck, Frederick K. Lutgens, & Denise Tasa. (2011). Earth: an introduction to physical geology (10th ed.). Upper Saddie River, NJ: Prentice Hall

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