Visual arts classroom changes post- online portfolio appropriation and discussions

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The visual arts classroom changes that occurred during online portfolio appropriation and how these changes were reflected in classroom discussions.

The visual arts classroom changes that occurred during online portfolio appropriation and how these changes were reflected in classroom discussions.

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  • Due to a conversion error, slide 16 features an incomplete point that should read: Visual Arts is an unusual subject choice, its selection tends to be that of unconventional learners who exercise creativity in many ways, such as challenging their educator’s objectives.
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  • I am presenting on Visual Arts classroom changes that occurred during online portfolio use and how these changes were reflected in classroom discussions.
  • This is part of my action research PhD in Media Studies project at two schools: first at an elite, all-boys, independent school in Rondebosch and a less well-resourced, mixed, government school in Athlone.
  • Since 2003 online portfolio services have emerged for creative professionals and hobbyists to publish digital portfolios online. There are hundreds of thousands of free members and paying subscribers according to stats from sites like Deviantart, Carbonmade and CGIsociety. These ‘ freemium ’ services can be appropriated at relatively low cost into the syllabi of well-resourced Visual Arts and Design educators.
  • Learners do struggle to present their end-of-year work at its best, and the online portfolio syllabus aimed to help them prepare for this, as well as post-school realities.
  • At the independent school, some parents were concerned that the cost of its one-laptop-per-learner policy was not justified by its educational value. By adopting online portfolio software into his syllabi, the Visual Arts Head of Department helped justify the policy’s value.
  • Carbonmade was appropriated as it met the criteria listed on the right. One surprise was that Carbonmade’s not affording any social networking functionality was actually to its advantage: The independent school educator was concerned about potential misuse of feedback by grade 10 learners who may not be emotionally mature enough to give constructive criticism.
  • Each Carbonmade online portfolio consists of a ‘homepage’, ‘about’ page, ‘artwork project folder. As you can see from the respective fields I list on each page, all pages are ensembles constructed out of a different variety of modal choices in; writing, layout, still image and colour. And when the user clicks through a portfolio, there can be a moving image effect.
  • The educator’s syllabus was intended to enable learners to create showcase electronic learning portfolios.
  • In creating their online portfolio, the independent school’s learners were given guidance in the type of modal choices they could make to help them create showcase Visual Arts electronic learning portfolios (or e-portfolios). As per this example’s portfolio title (includes ‘e-Portfolio’) and its folder titles (Sketchbook/Sourcebook, et al.).
  • Learners were also instructed what not to show; such as their school’s name, mobile phone number or home address.
  • Learners could upload up to 35 artworks into a maximum of five folders. They could also choose the navigation style in each folder; here you see a thumbnail driven selection example.
  • If a learner’s online portfolio was set to be searchable, a search engine result page was constructed from the learner’s entries and uploads.
  • The research fieldwork at the independent school has spanned three years; from 2010 to 2012.
  • Activity theory can explain the change from a Visual Arts class using an analogue portfolio system to one using online portfolios as an adjunct.
  • It does this through describing the components of an activity system and their relationships. For example, ‘Subjects’ working with ‘Tools’ on a common problem (or object) to transform it into ‘Outcomes’. This takes place in a ‘Community of Practice’ with a ‘Division of Labour’ and ‘Rules’, which may inter-relate.
  • One constant, or as constant as teenage boys can be, was the an unconventional class. And their educator. The learners were an unusually difficult group; five of them had learning difficulties.
  • To add e-portfolios as an adjunct to traditional analogue portfolios, the educator had to provide learners with access to digitzation tools and online portfolio access. This involved purchasing using two scanners and a camera in class.
  • At both sites, there were problems with the resourcing needed to support the use of online portfolios in class. This slide illustrates what learners and their educator required and problems experienced in class. Given
  • The educational community of practice expanded to include new members, highlighted in yellow.
  • The educator’s role changed in class, as he had to organize technical and teaching support, and used new online resources. The learners roles changed as they gave formal peer-feedback and taught each other, whilst taking on new roles.
  • This slide shows the nine rules that the Visual Arts class was initially governed by.
  • After the curricular adoption of online portfolio software, the educator needed to consider compliance with a whole 29 additional rules! The slides are on Slideshare.com, if you want to read them later.
  • The discussions I transcribed for this talk took place in the second-half of 2011.
  • An analysis of the discussions between educator and learner(s), or amongst peers, in these video-recorded lessons led to discussion content being grouped into three categories; ‘learners’ choices with Carbonmade’, ‘the process of online portfolio creation’ or ‘other issues’.
  • The discussions I have chosen DO NOT match Sinclair and Coulthard’s Initiation- Response -Feedback model, arguably because the lessons are online portfolio reviews and instruction had occurred earlier.
  • The first discussion see learner AH and learner SM talking about the opening line of his profile description. This highlighted the transgressive peer rules versus normative school culture.
  • It is interesting that although there were many other changes he could have made to be ‘more professional’ he had not made them in matric. He also ignored his educator’s advice to keep his email private.
  • By providing his school email address, learner AH could be contacted by the expanded community. He received this unsolicited email from Filter Foundry.
  • This led to the following discussion.
  • In this one, learner AH asked about whether he can he ‘ make my profile picture two lions mating in the middle of the Kruger Park? ’ and believed that this was a ‘ genuine question ’ . This raises questions about learners ’ objectives, ownership of the online portfolio, as well as pedagogy; how should an educator respond where the rules for professional practice differ from typical teenager patterns of use?
  • Eventually, learner AH sourced his profile picture, but in an unusual manner: learner SM provided it to him as a screenshot from learner AH dancing in a school event. This reflects an unexpected ‘division-of-labour’ from that typically expected in class of learners producing their own profile pictures.
  • The changing roles were also reflected in an exchange student and learner AH giving SM feedback on a search engine result for his name. SM had created two portfolios, as a consequence of forgetting his password. A further challenge was that the school’s email server blocked password reminders from Carbonmade. Since, the learner could not delete the old one without a password, both portfolios now appear in his name’s search result.
  • The choice of Carbonmade as an online portfolio tool, was also questioned; this is a discussion between the educator and learner EG about the choice of online portfolio software.
  • The online portfolio was not the only new tool in class, as learners brought iPads and Blackberry tablets, as well as GoPro video cameras. They also linked their Carbonmade online portfolios to new services.
  • The use of other online portfolios, such as Flickr, at school would require the educator to arrange access to the site via the school’s IT department.
  • It may be easy to for individuals in well-resourced homes to use online portfolios, but many changes must take place for their use in schools. The changes to the independent school’s Activity systems’ components can help us understand classroom discussions.
  • I’d also like to thank the DOE’s curricular advisers, educators and schools that I’ve worked with.

Transcript

  • 1. @travisnoakes PhD in Media Studies student. University of Cape Town, Centre for Film and Media Studies. Educator Learner Peers Research exploration. Online portfolio use, Visual Arts classroom changes and related discussions. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 1 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 2. 2010 - 2012 Where? Action research project with Visual Arts educators at an independent and government school This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 2 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 3. Example Number of portfolios* Deviantart 13 000 000 Carbonmade 393 450 Cgisociety 184 784 * Stats taken from these websites on the 16th of August, 2011 DeviantArt Carbonmade.com CGI Society Medium being studied. Online portfolio software has emerged since 2003 to share digital portfolios with an internet audience. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 3 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 4. Screenshot of learner MH’s Carbonmade Screenshot of learner MH’s Carbonmade Screenshot of learner MH’s Carbonmade‘homepage’, November, 2010 ‘homepage’, December, 2011 ‘homepage’, May, 2012 • Online portfolio syllabus taught for two weeks each year; • Ultimate aims are matric-exhibition preparation and preparing for post-school reality. Aligned with a National curricular statement module. Appropriated at school to help learners improve their ‘Management and Presentation’ skills. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 4 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 5. school_marketing_blog_angry_parents.png image sourced from http://yourschoolmarketing.com/2012/online-reviews/your-school-needs-reviews-today (29 July 2012) PTA motivator for online production at the independent school. New media syllabi can address parental concerns regarding one-laptop-per-learners’ value This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 5 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 6. Free (for students’ storage needs) Easy-to-publish Appropriate-brand Family-friendly Popular Variety Sustainable Legal (learners’ copyright protected) Limited interaction Brand association with creative professionals Educators’ choice of medium. An independent school educator chose Carbonmade as it met these criteria. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 6 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 7. 1 ‘Home’ page template 2 ‘About’ page template (artist’s profile) Portfolio title Work button About button Portfolio Profile title image Creative’s Contact Availability name details for freelance graphic Profile Areas of Folders of expertise digitised description artworks Skills Footer Footer Artist. Date. Artist. Date. Carbonmade banner logo 3 ‘Artwork project folder’ page template Folder Name, Description Artwork 4 ‘Search page Title results’ template Description Tags Client tags Footer Artist. Date. Carbonmade portfolio’s page types This presentation is licensed under Carbonmade Artist. Date. a Creative Commons Attribution-2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 7 Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 8. An “e-portfolio” is defined as a product, created by a learner, which collects digital artefacts and which articulates experiences, achievements and learning (JISC, 2008). Online portfolio syllabi’s production aim. Educator’s curricular goal: Visual Arts learner’s electron learning portfolio (e-portfolio) showcase This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 8 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 9. Learner AK example, 2012. Home page This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 9 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 10. Learner AK example, 2012. About page This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 10 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 11. Learner AK example, 2012. Artwork project folder pages This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 11 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 12. Learner AK example, 2011. ‘Search’ page results This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 12 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 13. Research duration. Followed online portfolio use by 16 learners for three years; grade 10 (2010) into matric (2012) This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 13 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 14. Learners worked in an activity system that shifted from one that only used analogue portfolios to one that used online portfolios as an adjunct. Learners’ common object. . Activity theory can describe the change from a traditional activity system to a new one This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 14 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 15. Coding First: intra-framework relationship (i.e. framework “A” to “B” or “no boundary object”) Second: inter-framework relationship (i.e. “construct 1” to “construct 2”) Tools Activity Theory (phase 1) 1 > 4 2 S-T T-S 3 T-O O-T 4 SO-Out Out-SO Interpsychological ACTION TRANSFORM Subject 1 S-O O-S Object Outcome 14 CO-Out Out-CO Activity Theory 9 C-T T-C (phase 2) 5 > 14 13 D-O O-D Intrapsychological 5 S-R R-S 6 R-O O-R 8 C-S S-C 10 C-O O-C 12 D-S S-D 7 11 Rules R-C Community of Practice D-C Division of Labour C-R C-D Activity theory diagram’s components. . Illustration of an activity system’s components. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 15 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 16. •Visual Arts is an unusual subject choice, its selection tends to be that of •5 members of the class had learning difficulties. ‘Subjects’ are constant. A difficult and unconventional group of learner subjects. Plus one educator. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 16 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 17. New ‘tools’. Tools added for digitisation and software use. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 17 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 18. Need: Problems experienced at research sites: Uninterrupted Black out Intermittent power Battery failure power Fast, reliable Copper cable theft Local broadband cable failure Stopgap implementation network International broadband cable failure Router failure No traffic shaping Accessible Expensive to license sufficient copies Different by OS Unstable software Inexperience with freeware Different GUI by browser Difficult to get a new password Additional scanners and cameras Software virus infection No swop-outs Appropriate hardware Underspecification Old, slow and unstable Missing drivers Timeous ICT Problem detection Notification Unavailable Slow warranty resolution support No Teaching-with-technology support Limited budget ‘New wine in old bottles’ Suitable pedagogy No policies No guidelines No roadmap No incentives to new media production in any local classroom. Easy to underestimate the resource changes which online portfolio tool use and digitization requires. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 18 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 19. Educational community of practice 1. Classroom community of practice 2. Extended community of practice At the independent school, the classroom • Parents; community comprised: • DOE curricular advisers; •Researcher; • Educators; •Visual Arts educator; • IT Department; •Learners; • Online portfolio software’s •Student teacher; developers; •Information Technology (IT) integration • Online audiences specialist and other IT support. - desired - undesirable. New ‘community members’. Changing ‘community’ in- and out of class. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 19 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 20. Changes to educator’s roles Changes to learners’ roles Organise support from: New roles: •Student teacher; •Online portfolio roles (creator, viewer, critic) •ICT integration specialist; •Showcase extra-mural art and other •ICT helpdesk; •personal interests •ICT Director and staff. •Contribute to subject-material in other curricula Use new online resources: New peer-to-peer roles: •Supplement curricular materials on •Assessment; the school’s intranet with links to •Feedback; other resources. •Peer instruction. New ‘division-of-labour’roles in the classroom community. Changing ‘division-of-labour’ roles in class. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 20 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 21. 9 rules before… 1. Satisfy educator’s personal beliefs; 2. Relate to the educator’s culture of practice; 3. Be commonly-accepted Fine Art literacies; 4. Fall within school’s budget and resourcing; 5. Show curricular alignment with the National Curriculum Statement (NCS); 6. Meet the school’s professional values; 7. Accord with school policies; 8. Satisfy other Department of Education (DOE) policies; 9. Accord within discipline norms. Changes to classroom ‘rules’. From ‘before’ to… 9 Rules pre-adoption This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 21 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 22. 38 rules post-adoption! Outside class: 1.Align with the Provincial and National DOE Visual Arts Department In the syllabus and curricula: strategy; 12.Utilises ICT resource both in class and integrates external 2.Comply with DOE subject-area literacies (i.e. Visual Communication resources; Design); 13.Ideally has a second teacher for technology support; 3.Adhere to Visual Arts (versus Fine Arts) literacies; 14.Sufficient time allocated in the syllabus (i.e. falls under 4.Include “new media literacies” relevant for secondary-school “Presentation and Management” which is 5% of the Visual Arts’ mark pedagogy; outcome); 5.Adherence to an ICT proficiency definition and criteria for 15.E-portfolio curricula and Visual Arts syllabi integration; benchmarking; 16.E-portfolio service selection; 6.Have support from a DOE decision-maker; 17.E-portfolio assessment and marking criteria; 7.Have sufficient resourcing curriculum planner and policy; 18.Self-presentation as a creative professional; 8.Educators interested, and able, to teach new media production; 19.In- and out-of-class support for digitization of artworks; 9.Educator performance (private versus public) and commitments; 20.Legal safety (respecting copyright and trademarks). 10.Realize benefits from curricular ICT investment; 21.E-safety (privacy protection). 11.Understand, and incorporate, youth media production patterns. 22.Terms of use for e-portfolios, networks and computers. 23.Educator’s tracking of compliance and appropriate feedback levels. 24.Using social bookmarking for e-portfolio assessment and feedback. 25.Expectations on suitable content (extra-mural work, school exhibitions). 26.Appropriate student focus in class. 27.Online roles (creator, viewer, critic). 28.Online community standards. 29.Using the resourcing and support available for (in)formal learning at home. … after! This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 22 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 23. Case study 1: lesson numbers, dates and subject 2010 19 April Introduction to Online Portfolios . 2011, cont. 20 April Learning how to make a good digital copy of ones works. 2 Mar Using Diigo in class project. 21 April Capturing images (double lesson). 25 Mar Second introduction to Diigo 23 April Introduction to writing the creative profile (about page). 28 Mar Using Diigo in class project. 28 April Insert personal profiles into the webpage. 29 Mar Using Diigo in class project. 29 April Completion of any outstanding review documents. 21 SepE-portfolio consolidation and development 30 April Applying new guidelines to creative profile writing. 23 SepE-portfolio consolidation and development 3 May Answering the Online Portfolio questionnaires. 11 Oct E-portfolio consolidation and development 11 May Capturing newly updated work. 12 Oct Digitizing, presenting and publishing. 17 May Lunch break work. 18 Oct Online portfolio and Diigo task. 8 Sep Post-drawing test digitization and upload. 25 Oct Online portfolio lesson. 16 Nov Upload of Fikilile poster designs. 11 Nov Online portfolio lesson (in library). 2011 24 Jan Run through the e-portfolio checklist. 2012 27 Jan Remedial e-portfolio class. 30 Jan E-portfolio review. 8 Feb Critical Analysis introduction. Introduction to social 13 Feb E-portfolio review. bookmarking with Diigo. 12 Mar E-portfolio review. 11 Feb Critique of a partners work via Diigo. 20 Mar E-portfolio review. 16 Feb Work with Diigo and Carbonmade. 11 May Individual e-portfolio review. 25 Feb Critique of a partners work via Diigo. 16 May Emergency e-portfolio workshop. Research site. Focus on discussions from revision lessons in 2011 This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 23 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 24. Learners spoke about: A.The types of choices they could make with Carbonmade; B. The process of online portfolio creation; C. Or other issues. Choices, process and other issues. Three types of discussion content This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshopCreative Commons Attribution- 24 a Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 25. Sinclair and Coulthard’s ‘Initiation-Reponse-Follow-Up’ (IRF) model for classroom talk (1975): Initiation: teacher introduces the topic. Response: One, or more learners respond to the teacher’s initiation. Feedback: The teacher responds to, and usually evaluates the pupil’s response. Discussion patterns. Not the usual classroom talk pattern. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 25 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 26. Learner AH: My Dads like, ‘you need to be more professional’. Learner SM: That is professional. Learner AH: (quotes from the introduction to his about profile description), Hi, my name is Andrew and I like to padi. Not my friends. I know for a fact they dont party. I PARTY. Thats professional? (laughs) Learner SM: (laughs) Just leave it in, please? Learner AH: No, I wont. I cant. Transgressive peer rules versus normative school culture. Daddy’s watching me. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 26 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 27. Screenshot of learner AH’s Carbonmade ‘about’, May, 2012 What does ‘professionalism’ mean to a matric learner? This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 27 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 28. Hi! I just discovered your portfolio online and would like to invite you to Filter Foundry. Your work is amazing and derserves to be seen by our creative community. Its really fast and simple to upload. A short video after sign-up will show you how it works. To get started, from FilterFoundry.com click the gold button in the top right corner "I am a Creative" and enter "CREATE1024" as your promo code during sign-up to enable your lifelong free account. I look forward to networking with you on our creative platform! RegardsNicki AlcombrightArt Curator – Filter Foundry nicki@filterfoundry.com Also follow us on twtter to stay connected: twitter.com/filterfoundry Please unsubscribe me Filter Foundry email to learner AH. SPAM email content This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 28 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 29. Learner AH: Sir, I was told to tell you that, um, someone like found my Carbonmade and like asked me to go on their website. Researcher: Great. Learner SM: Little does he know it was a bulk email. Learner AH: It wasnt. Ill show you it. Learner SM: Did it have your name in it? She just says ‘Hi’ She does not say ‘Hi, Andrew’ Learner AH: Yes, she does. Learner SM: Its just sent out in bulk, to just everyone. Learner AH: It said: ‘Hi Andrew, I noticed your Carbonmade portfolio and I would like you to join (website name). (AH tries to access his email account). Access not allowed by (school name). Oh, well, I cant access it. Researcher: Can you forward that email to me? Learner AH: Ja, sure. Learner SM: No access. Conveniently. Learner AH: I’ll slap you. Learner AH: So thats where I activated my account. Learner SM: Hi. Your name isnt involved. It is a bulk email. Learner AH: Why would she give this to me then? Learner SM: She sent it to a lot of people. Dont you understand? Learner AH: OK. Thats not even… Learner SM: Sorry, Sir, Im just explaining to Andrew that he is not special. Researcher: OK. Can you forward that to me? Discussion between learner AH and SM about the Filter Foundry email. SPAM Email This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 29 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 30. Learner AH: Sir, can I make my profile picture two lions mating in the middle of the Kruger Park? Educator R: Firstly, thats a really stupid idea. Learner AH: But, Sir, thats such a rare occurrence. Educator R: I actually find that offensive and I think you are behaving like a juvenile. Learner SM: Sir, he should get three demerits, Sir. Educator R: I think... Show some level of maturity and some intelligence. Learner AH: Well, thats what Im doing. Youre the one who is getting argumentative. Im trying to ask you something. Discussion about learner AH’s About page’s profile picture. AH’s profile picture choice. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 30 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 31. Learner SM: Wheres your picture? Learner AH: I dont have one. Learner SM: Why dont you have a picture? Learner AH: Dude, cos Im lazy. (laughs) Learner SM: Didnt you get that picture from me? Learner AH: Send me one email again. (Learner AH used Carbonmade’s Graphic User Interface (GUI) to select a profile picture to upload) Learner AH: Ive got this one of (‘special cultural event’s name’s’) Movement. (Learner AH searches a folder of imagery and chooses IMG_2717. He pressed the ‘Add’ button and an image of him in a dance group showed on-screen.) Learner AH: Its working! Learner SM: That is so outrageous. Discussion about AH’s profile picture. . AH’s profile picture upload. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 31 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 32. Exchange student: Why do you have two… (learner SM’s firstname), why do you have two Carbonmades? Learner SM: I dont have two, I only have one! Exchange student: There are two here (he points to the screens search engine results) Learner SM: Well, thats wrong. Learner AH: ‘Is wrong’ (laughs). Learner AH: (laughs) Is two (SM first and surname)! There is... Exchange student: It is two. Learner AH: Thats so dumb. Theres one of you and the other one. Learner SM: Now, thats a gangster one. The other one is so sad. Discussion between learner AH, an exchange student and learner SM about his search engine results One learner, two online portfolios. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 32 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 33. Learner EG: Out of interest, sir, why do we use Carbonmade and not something like Flickr? Whereas with Flickr you can get, like there is a size limit, not, not, er, a number limit and... Educator R: Well, OK, look, we, I looked at a number of software and decided on this. Um, there, certainly for my purposes it is satisfactory, and you may have a parallel portfolio if you wish to. But, um, what Im trying to stay with, is to get one thing to work properly. And I think that, um... Learner EG: Like, it is so limiting and I already have like two images remaining. And it is like so, forty pictures, sir, is like nothing. Educator R: Yes, I am conscious of that and maybe, in some ways, it is a good thing, because it forces you to, sort of, refine and choose your very best work. Learner EG: Ja? Educator R::So, um, there is no reason why you cannot archive your stuff. So, I think that part of the process is selection and maybe that is one of the things that you have to do in art is to learn to select, so I think that... Learner EG: Like for matric, for example, we dont want to have a few works up. We want them to be able to see all our stuff, sir. Using this as our portfolio... Educator R: Well, you are using that as an adjunct and should you, uh,... in a sense, they are saying to you its not the entire exhibition. Learner EG: Ja, OK. Educator R: And there is nothing to stop you, as I say compiling, if you have your own work that you feel is limited, for you to create an additional portfolio. So, you say you do a lot of photography? Learner EG discusses the Carbonmade software choice with his educator. Why Carbonmade? This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 33 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 34. iPad tablet GoPro video camera Links to other online portolios: •Vimeo •YouTube •Wix •Flickr Discussions between educator and learner GH, CG and researcher about their new tools. New tools in an affluent school. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 34 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 35. Learner EG: So, sir, could you ask the helpdesk to unblock Flickr? I dont know why... Educator R: I see. OK. Learner EG: … I cant get on it? Educator R: I can talk to them about it. Yes, thats a very good point... Yes, Ill talk to them about it. Learner EG requests that learners be given access to Flickr over the school’s network. Newer tools mean newer rules. This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 35 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 36. • Online portfolios require significant support to launch in school classrooms due to the many changes required to support their use; particularly in ‘tools’, ‘rules’ and ‘division of labour’. • Classroom discussions can be contextualised by describing how an activity system’s components change from the traditional activity to a new one. In closing. The end, for now… This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 36 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.
  • 37. Thanks for your time  ! And to this research’s supporters… University of Cape Town, Centre for Film and Media Studies. Dr Marion Walton ‘Digimobs SA’ research group ‘South African Multimodal Education’ (SAME) research group National Research Foundation. Grantholders Research Fund. Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Department of Informatics and Design. Prof Johannes Cronje and the ‘Technology in Education and Research Postgraduate Students’ (TERPS) group This presentation is licensed under2012/08/03 @travisnoakes presentation to Prof. David Buckingham’s workshop 37 a Creative Commons Attribution- Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License.