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Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Shakespeare
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Shakespeare

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Published in: Education
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  • Transcript

    • 1. William Shakespeare
    • 2. The Beginning
    • 3. Background
    • 4. School
    • 5. Marriage
    • 6.  
    • 7. The Actor
    • 8. The Writer
    • 9. Retirement
    • 10. Death
      • Good friend for Jesus sake forbear To dig the dust enclosed here! Blest be the man that spares these stones, And curst be he that moves my bones
    • 11. Shakespeare's Influence
      • Invented about 2000 words
      • aerial, critic, submerge, majestic, hurry, lonely, road, assassination, laughable, reliance, mountaineer, fortune-teller, bandit, watch-dog, schoolboy, shooting star, moonbeam, dew-drop, dawn, alligator, lady-bird, luggage, eyeball, love-letter, farmhouse, birthplace, worthless, long-legged, pale-faced, hot-blooded, flea-bitten, green-eyed, upstairs, downstairs, exposure......
      • Responsible for many phrases
      • Break the ice', 'All that glitters is not gold', 'Hot-blooded', 'In the mind’s eye', ‘ Heart of gold ’, 'Housekeeping', 'It’s all Greek to me', 'The naked truth', 'One fell swoop', 'Method in his madness'..... ,
    • 12. Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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