Optimizing Value to the Enterprise with Integrated Enterprise Architecture
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • One problem: defining the current state first. That locks in 'current state thinking.' Instead, define the future state first, then map the current state to it.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,979
On Slideshare
5,976
From Embeds
3
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
826
Comments
1
Likes
8

Embeds 3

http://www.slideshare.net 3

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Optimizing Value to the Enterprise with Integrated Enterprise Architecture Brian James Director of Product Management Metastorm
  • 2. Agenda
    • Introduction
    • Building Enterprise Architecture
    • Using Enterprise Architecture
    • Getting Started
  • 3. What is Enterprise Architecture? “ In a large modern enterprise, a rigorously defined framework is necessary to be able to capture a vision of the ‘ entire system’ in all its dimensions and complexity. Enterprise Architecture (EA) is a framework which is able to coordinate the many facets that make up the fundamental essence of an enterprise. It is the master plan which ‘ acts as an integrating force’ between aspects of business planning such as goals, visions, strategies and governance principles; aspects of business operations such as business terms, organisation structures, processes and data; aspects of automation such as application systems and databases; and the enabling technological infrastructure of the business such as computers, operating systems and networks.” Dennis A. Stevenson, Senior Editor, IS World Research
  • 4. Building Enterprise Architecture
  • 5. Enterprise Architecture Terminology
    • Today’s Enterprise Architecture Frameworks
      • Zachman Framework
      • Enterprise-Wide IT Architecture
      • The Open Group
      • Federal Enterprise Architecture
      • DoDAF
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 6. Enterprise Architecture Framework Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture Data / Object Product / Service People Process Service / Application Software Hardware Interface Network Data Architecture Capability Environment Goal Application Architecture
  • 7. Strategic Direction
    • Objectives
    • Examine the enterprise’s environment, assess internal capabilities and set direction
    • Validate the business principles and strategic business drivers of the organization
    • Create a vision for the enterprise that will guide the development of each architecture component
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 8. Business Interaction Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 9. Strategy Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 10. Goal Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 11. Business Architecture
    • Objectives
    • Describe the current baseline Business Architecture
    • Develop a target Business Architecture, describing the product and/or service strategy, and the organizational, functional, process, event, information, and geographic aspects of the business environment
    • Analyze the gaps between the baseline and target Business Architectures
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 12. Organization Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 13. Workflow Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 14. Data Architecture
    • Objectives
    • Define the major types and sources of data necessary to support the business, in a way that is understandable by the stakeholders
    • Define the data relevant to the enterprise so that they are complete, consistent and stable
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 15. Class Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 16. Application Architecture
    • Objectives
    • Define what kinds of application systems are relevant to the enterprise, and what those applications need to do in order to manage data and present information to the system users
    • Describe the applications as logical groups of capabilities that manage data in the Data Architecture and support the business functions in the Business Architecture
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 17. System Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 18. Use Case Model Business Architecture Strategic Direction Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 19. Storyboard Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 20. Technology Architecture
    • Objectives
    • Define the major kinds of technologies needed to provide an environment for the System Architecture
    • Identify technology principles and platforms
    • Define the technology platforms and the distribution of data and applications
    • Establish a justification for the technology platforms by relating them to the business functions that will utilize them
    • Support future growth
    Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 21. Location Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 22. System Interaction Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 23. Deployment Model Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 24. Using Enterprise Architecture
  • 25. A Pile of Documents does not Make an Enterprise Architecture “ An Enterprise Architecture is a tool to help executives think about the organization as a whole. An Enterprise Architecture captures a wide variety of information, establishes relationships among the various documents and diagrams and stores all of the information together in a single repository, so that managers can then see the relationships, ask questions, identify problems, or run simulations to help make decisions about changes they are considering .” Developing an Enterprise Architecture Paul Harmon, Business Process Trends
  • 26. The Value of Enterprise Architecture is in the Relationships Enterprise Architecture is more than a collection of the constituent architectures (Business, Application, Technology, and Information). The interrelationships among these architectures , and their joint properties , are essential to the Enterprise Architecture. Enterprise-Wide IT Architecture (EWITA)
  • 27. Association Matrices Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 28. Navigator Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction Business Architecture Data Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture
  • 29. Enterprise Architecture Provides Many Possibilities Strategy Model Goal Model Business Interaction Model Location Model Corporate Strategy Application Architecture State Chart Use Case Model Operation Model Storyboard Model System Model Communication Model Software Development Tools Organization Model Data Architecture Deliverable Model Logical Data Model Physical Data Model Data Modeling Tools XMI Interface Technology Architecture Technical Architecture Model Deployment Model Infrastructure Management Tools XML Interface Strategic Direction Business Architecture Systems Architecture Technology Architecture Technical Tools EA Associations Process Validation by Simulation Process Architecture Business Process Management Tools Process Hierarchy Workflow Model Business Rules XMI Interface The model relationships to be analyzed depend upon your specific objectives. BPEL Interface
  • 30. Enterprise Architecture Benefits Process Effectiveness Operational Efficiency Opportunity Creation Automation Efficiency Current Future Revenue Generation Cost Reduction
  • 31. Different Objectives will Emphasize Different Architectures Process Effectiveness Operational Efficiency Opportunity Creation Development Efficiency Current Future Revenue Generation Cost Reduction Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture System Architecture Business Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction
  • 32. Getting Started
  • 33. Steps to Enterprise Architecture Step 1: Define “Enterprise” Scope “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 34. Step 2: Define Strategic Direction Strategic Direction Future “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 35. Step 3: Define Current Architecture Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture Process Effectiveness Operational Efficiency Strategic Direction Future “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 36. Step 4: Define Future Architecture Future System Architecture Business Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture Opportunity Creation Automation Efficiency Justification “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 37. Step 5: Gap Analysis Gap Analysis Future ? ? ? System Architecture Business Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture Process Improvements System Enhancements Infrastructure Changes “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 38. Step 6: Strategy Evaluation Gap Analysis Future Process Improvements System Enhancements Infrastructure Changes System Architecture Business Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture + + Cost, Timing & Resources needed to achieve Strategic Direction = “ Enterprise” Scope, Direction Current
  • 39. Key Planning Decisions What are my current EA objectives and how will my architecture be utilized in the future?
  • 40. Different Objectives Emphasize Different Architectures Process Effectiveness Operational Efficiency Opportunity Creation Development Efficiency Current Future Strategic Direction Business Architecture System Architecture Technology Architecture System Architecture Business Architecture Technology Architecture Strategic Direction Revenue Generation Cost Reduction
  • 41. Key Planning Decisions What are my current EA objectives and how will my architecture be utilized in the future? How much organizational commitment is required for success?
  • 42. Lessons Learned
    • Sponsorship
      • Executive sponsor(s) must demonstrate commitment at the very outset, and periodically throughout the program.
    • Management Structure
      • Business management oversight of the EA process ensures alignment with the mission, vision and business strategy of the organization.
    • Enterprise Architecture Scope
      • Don’t commit to so much detail that you get lost in the weeds, but don’t scope the architecture definition at such a high level that there is limited value to the results.
  • 43. Lessons Learned
    • Communication Plan
      • Don’t assume that all members of an architecture team and key stakeholders understand the architecture scope and products the same. Communicate, communicate, communicate!
    • EA and Business Metrics
      • Identify and collect the data that can substantiate the impact of the EA on the enterprise and its business processes.
    • Leverage Thought Leaders
      • Most thought leaders are able to explain the vision and purpose of the EA to all levels of stakeholders, and “sell’ the concept. Don’t assume that the thought leaders must or will come from management.
  • 44. Thank You!
    • Brian James
    • Director of Product Management
    • Metastorm
    • [email_address]