Sherry d - trail presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Sherry d - trail presentation

on

  • 641 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
641
Views on SlideShare
640
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://trailplan.blogspot.ca 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Thank-you so just before I get started I’ll mention that you are welcomed to ask questions at any time during my presentation. I’ve also given you a copy of my slides to take with you as I have just 30 minutes and some of the slides may be covered quickly. In addition, I’ve brought with me a selection of lifestyle resources so feel free to take what you would like; they are with the physical activity display; these can be ordered by calling our Health Connection line.
  • Stand up if you know someone who has been impacted by …Heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes. Thank-you, so you can see that chronic disease impacts almost all of us in some way and can be devastating to individuals and families.
  • The worry is that in Canada, 16 million people live with chronic diseases. These diseases seriously affect their quality of life and cause premature death. Type 2 diabetes used to be more prevalent in the aging adult population is now is being seen in younger adults and even children. The number of Canadians who are overweight or obese has steadily increased. Among other things, research links unhealthy food choices and inactive or sedentary lifestyles with the risk for chronic disease. A sedentary lifestyle is just as dangerous to our health as smoking a pack of cigarettes a day.
  • Nobel Prize winner George Bernard Shaw was a visionary and social activist of his time and he knew the importance of people sharing ideas about life and even healthy living back in his time. This is essentially what my presentation is about today. We will share ideas about how we can influence those around us to understand the importance of a healthy community – a sustainable community – a community that is vibrant and supports people to live well. We’re all invested in that - so as George states ….If you have an apple and I have an apple….and we exchange these apples, then you and I still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas….so here’s the plan. There are several apples placed on tables and that apple represents the exchange of ideas to promote health within our community. As I go through the presentation you will be asked for your thoughts about something and the person with the apple in front of them will share their thoughts. Now don’t treat the apple like a hot potato because there is no right or wrong answer here - but rather a respectful exchange of our ideas. Once you’ve had the apple then pass it on to someone else. This will be our community collaboration to plant the seeds for ideas that you can go away with and share with others to promote healthy living messages in the work you do. At end of my presentation, someone will be receiving a prize basket of apples and a pedometer to take home with them.
  • So what makes a community healthy? Well, we’ve heard some really good examples from the other speakers today and there are some general definitions about this – as I’ve included here. But who better to ask then those who are part of our community. So let’s take take a few minutes to hear your thoughts about what makes your community healthy? In a few words, how would you describe this? Those with the apple please stand and share your thoughts.
  • I’ll let you read these on your own - but here is a list of qualities of a healthy community as described by the Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition.
  • This is also has meaning in relation to a sustainable community which is about human well-being; that is, enabling people to lead healthy and economically productive lives in a clean environment, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. By using partnership in the community development process, members and the community should gain control over the issues that affect them.
  • Action is needed to increase the capacity for residents to make healthy choices and decrease the barriers to physical activity and healthy eating. The Medical Officer of Health Dr. Charles Gardner states that it is our shared responsibility to ensure individuals, families and commmunities in Simcoe Muskoka are the healthiest possible….we must work collaboratively and strategically to increase opportunities for residents to make healthy choices. I call on everyone to act now for a healthy future.
  • So what’s involved in achieving a healthy community. Well the four key areas include: Community wide participation Broad involvement of all sectors of the community Local government commitment And the creation of healthy public policies. Essentially all sectors of the community are inter-related and share their knowledge, expertise and perspectives, and work together to create a healthy community. So knowing this, those with an apple – please share what you think is the first step in achieving a healthy community? (Answer: is increasing awareness) People need to know there’s an issue and begin thinking about how to address it.
  • This is not an exhaustive list and it’s highly individual but I thought you may find it interesting to know what research shows to be some of the main barriers to active living. I’ll let you read them on your own but I would like to point out that people often say they just don’t have time to fit in any physical activity so what better way to do this by incorporating into your daily routine such as walking to places you go routinely instead of relying on your car for those short trips. The last point on the slide refers to what we use often in health promotion are the terms “walkable communities” and “active transportation” but we also know that there are a lot of people who don’t really know what that means.
  • So what does having a walkable community mean? It is defined as a community where walking, biking, and other modes of human-powered activity is supported and encouraged in the daily living of residents. It is also defined as a community that features a medium density mix of housing, stores, businesses, schools, and destinations in walking distance with paths, trails and sidewalks that connect neighbourhoods to one another. In addition, walkable communities are attractive, invite further exploration, and are places where people feel safe. And a walkable community is an important aspect of a healthy and vibrant community.
  • When most people think about physical activity, they picture it as a recreational endeavour – as a time set apart from other tasks with the primary goal of exercising. Recreational physical activity is defined as exercise, sports, recreation or hobbies occurring during leisure time. In contrast, physical activity for utilitarian reasons (often referred to as active transportation) is self-powered human movement where the primary purpose is to get to the destination or accomplish the task. Active transportation comprises non-motorized, human-powered modes of transportation, such as walking, cycling and wheeling to and from places such as work, school, shopping, carrying out errands for visiting friends. Essentially, it is building physical activity opportunities into everyday life. Active transportation allows tasks to get accomplished with the added benefit of incorporating physical activity into the daily routine.
  • Different types of built environments are needed to support recreational and utilitarian physical activity. Recreational physical activity requires such things as baseball diamonds, tennis courts, arenas, soccer fields, recreation centres etc. Whereas, utilitarian physical activity requires things like connected sidewalks, bicycle lanes, pathways etc. along with amenities within reasonable distances. So those now holding the apple, tell us what you think can support both recreational and utilitarian physical activity to carry out everyday tasks (Hint: what we’re here for today) (Answer: trails (both urban and rural trails) but also sidewalks, pathways, bike pathways etc.)
  • In an effort to establish some baseline information about what our residents understood about walkable communities we initiated a walkON survey in November and December of 2007. Telephone interviews were conducted in order to understand the current levels of awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Simcoe Muskoka residents regarding walkable communities. Survey respondents came from every township and municipality and represented various adult age groups living in cities, towns and rural settings. __________________________________________________________ (At the time of the survey, there was no data on this from the general public (18 years or older) living in Simcoe Muskoka). (The survey was completed by trained staff from the Survey Research Centre of the University of Waterloo). A sample of 403 respondents was achieved so there was a 20.8% response rate, which is typical of telephone surveys. This sample size allowed achieving a 95% confidence interval with a 4.9% margin of error. Only one respondent refused to continue answering the survey and this survey was partially completed). Random selection of an adult (18 years or older) in the household was selected by choosing the person with the next birthday.)
  • Questions were asked about physical activity levels in general as well as for both recreational and utilitarian purposes For example… “In a typical week in the past 3 month, how many hours did you usually spend walking to work or to school or while doing errands?’
  • Over 85% of survey respondents felt their ability to be physically active was impacted by having roads, sidewalks, and pathways that were in good condition, that were connected to each other, and that were well-lit at night as well as having parks within a 5-10 minute walk from their neighbourhood.
  • Survey participants were also asked the question, “Do you have trails or pathways within a 5-10 minute walking or cycling distance of your home?” For those who answered “no”, a second question was asked about the degree to which they would support “adding trails or pathways to their neighbourhood or community” Over one third (35%) of respondents do not have trails or pathways with 5-10 minutes walking or cycling distance for their home. And almost three quarters of these (75%) would support adding trails or pathways to their neighbourhood or community. Over two-thirds (68%) of respondents found that having trails or pathways within a 5-10 minute walking or cycling could affect their ability to be physically active.
  • Survey participants were also asked whether they had ever read about or heard the term “walkable community” and 69% of the respondents had not heard or read it. Having heard the term “walkable community” was not a factor in being physically active in a typical week - but it could influence the number of days of physical activity. This was statistically significant and highlights the importance of awareness-raising and knowledge building initiatives. Now remember… awareness and knowledge is the first step to behaviour change.
  • Some of the survey recommendations that are relevant to what we’re speaking about today include: Partner with other agencies to add and build upon the findings of the survey; Conduct social marketing campaigns that highlight the concept of walkable communities, introducing the concept of walking or cycling as the principle transportation mode for common trips to locations that are taken on an almost daily basis and within a reasonable walking or cycling distance. There needs to be a shift from personal/individual action - towards community/group action to improve the walkability of the neighbourhood. Promote walkability surveys with community partners to facilitate the evaluation of people’s own neighbourhoods, and to identify the existence or lack of supportive infrastructure and nearby services. I have also brought with me today a Walkability Checklist that neighbourhoods or groups can use to assess how walkable their community is – it is also on the display table.
  • There are many ways that we share information with others in the community and that may or may not involve the media. What communication strategies to increase awareness in the community do you or your organizations use? Those now holding the apples, can share.
  • This slide speaks to communication effectiveness – which I will leave for you to go through on your own, however I would like to point out the importance of recognizing and rewarding local success stories. So profile those residents who are making use of the things that have been put in place in the community such as using the trails on a regular basis to get to work, or a mother who organizes a walking school bus program for children in her neighbourhood. This helps others to see themselves doing the same.
  • Things to consider when marketing a public communications message might include: Enhancing opportunities for all population groups paying special attention to children and youth, older people, people and neighbourhoods with low socioeconomic status, employees, people with disabilities and other ethnic minority and at-risk groups ( Source: WHO Europe Edwards & TSouros “A Healthy City is an Active City”) Clearly define and understand the target populations you wish to reach. For example, while creating a pedestrian or cycling path in a particular neighbourhood may seem to benefit all the residents, older people may not use it if it is designed for fast cycling and has no separate areas for walking and rest/meeting places with picnic tables (Source: WHO Europe Edwards & TSouros “A Healthy City is an Active City”) Be sure to explain the link between health, active transportation and the environment (Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute). This is not about restricting the use of motorized vehicles but about enhancing choice and opportunities for various modes of travel that promotes physical activity and healthy lifestyles for all ages. Identify links and extensions of existing bikeways, sidewalks and both urban and rural trails within and between municipalities And focus on a variety of settings including schools, workplaces, neighbourhoods and facilities (Source: WHO Europe Edwards & TSouros “A Healthy City is an Active City”)
  • These are just a few more considerations for those who are looking for support for their healthy community initiatives. Such as financial support from private business, government and business leaders serving as embassadors, and partnering with the media. I would just like to highlight that there are also many different types of grant programs that can support various aspects of healthy community programs - such as the Ministry of Health Promotion’s Healthy Communities Fund and the Green Municipal Fund.
  • Here I’ve listed community strategies which can build community awareness of health issues or community programs, events and infrastructure that already exists which supports residents to make better choices.
  • So what to take away from this today? Well know that it takes time to influence behaviour but every effort moves people along stages of change It’s a win-win opportunity if we work together to improve the health of our community Be aware of the ways in which you can support a healthy community Make it easy for residents to make healthy choices Be Involved in raising awareness And Speak out for changes in the community that support healthy living
  • You can refer to this list of websites to find a copy of the full walkON survey or to order resources, to find key messages to share with the public and learn about government programs. Also know that there are health unit staff who serve all of the communities within Simcoe and Muskoka who you can consult with for additional information and support. And lastly the prize winner of the gift basket is the person who has an apple sticker under their chair.

Sherry d - trail presentation Sherry d - trail presentation Presentation Transcript

  • The Trails of Simcoe County: A Symposium of Trail Development April 13, 2010 Presentation by Sherry Diaz Public Health Nurse Chronic Disease Prevention, Healthy Lifestyle Program Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit
  • Rates of Chronic Disease in Simcoe Muskoka are a Concern
    • Stand up if you know someone who has been impacted by:
    • Heart disease
    • Cancer
    • Type 2 diabetes
  • Chronic Disease Impact
    • In Canada, 16 million people live with chronic diseases. These diseases seriously affect their quality of life and cause premature death.
    • Type 2 diabetes at one time more prevalent in the older adult population is now is being seen in younger adults and even children.
    • The number of Canadians who are overweight or obese has also steadily increased.
    • Research links unhealthy food
    • choices and sedentary lifestyles
    • with the risk for chronic disease.
    • A sedentary lifestyle is just
    • as dangerous to our health as
    • smoking a pack of cigarettes
    • a day.
  • George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)
    • If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples, then you and I still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas.
  • What makes a community healthy?
    • A healthy community is one that embraces the belief that health is more than merely an absence of disease; a healthy community includes those elements that enable people to maintain a high quality of life and productivity.
  • Qualities of a Healthy Community
    • Clean and safe physical environment
    • Peace, equity and social justice
    • Adequate access to food, water, shelter, income, safety, work and recreation for all
    • Adequate access to health care services
    • Opportunities for learning and skill development
    • Strong, mutually supportive relationships and networks
    • Workplaces that are supportive of individual and family well-being
    • Wide participation of residents in decision-making
    • Strong local cultural and spiritual heritage
    • Diverse and vital economy
    • Protection of the natural environment
    • Responsible use of resources to ensure long term sustainability
    • (Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition)
  • Sustainable Communities
    • Sustainable community development is about human well-being; that is, enabling people to lead healthy and economically productive lives in a clean environment, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (Public Health Agency of Canada)
  • Action is Needed
    • Action is needed to increase the capacity for residents to make healthy choices and decrease the barriers to physical activity and healthy eating.
    • It is our shared responsibility to ensure individuals, families and commmunities in Simcoe Muskoka are the healthiest possible….we must work collaboratively and strategically to increase opportunities for residents to make healthy choices. I call on everyone to act now for a healthy future.
    • (Dr. Charles Gardner, Medical Officer of Health)
  • Achieving a Healthy Community
    • Community wide participation
    • Broad involvement of all sectors of the community
    • Local government commitment
    • Creation of healthy public policies
    • All sectors of the community are inter-related and share their knowledge, expertise and perspectives, and work together to create a healthy community
    • What is generally the first step?
  • Real & Perceived Barriers to an Active Lifestyle
    • Lack of awareness of the importance of physical activity
    • Lack of understanding that physical activity can be added up even 10 minutes at a time to meet daily recommendations
    • Lack of understanding of the range of activities that constitute physical activity – you don’t need to be a marathon runner!
    • Belief that physical activity is competitive, organized sport-based, expensive, or requires specific skills and athletic abilities
    • Increased "non-active" time spent on TV, video, computer games and surfing the internet
    • Lack of time, energy and interest, skill, sidewalks or facilities
    • Excessive cost, long term illness, disability, fear of injury or safety, weather
    • Lack of knowledge of the definition, features and values of health promotion e.g. use of the term “Walkable Community” or “Active Transportation”
  • A Walkable Community is…
    • Defined as a community where walking, biking, and other modes of human-powered activity is supported and encouraged in the daily living of residents.
    • It is a community that features a medium density mix of housing, stores, businesses, schools, and destinations in walking distance with paths, trails and sidewalks that connect neighbourhoods to one another. In addition, walkable communities are attractive, invite further exploration, and are places where people feel safe.
    • It is an important aspect of a healthy and vibrant community.
  • Active Transportation vs. Recreational Physical Activity
    • Recreational physical activity is defined as exercise, sports, recreation or hobbies occurring during leisure time.
    • Physical activity for utilitarian reasons (often referred to as active transportation)
    • is non-motorized, human-powered modes of transportation such as walking, cycling and wheeling to and from places such as work, school, shopping, carrying out errands for visiting friends. Essentially, it is building physical activity opportunities into everyday life.
  • Different Built Environments
    • Recreational physical activity requires e.g. baseball diamonds, tennis courts, arenas, soccer fields, recreation centres etc.
    • Utilitarian physical activity requires e.g. environments with connecting sidewalks, bicycle lanes, pathways etc. along with amenities within reasonable distances.
    • What can support both recreational and utilitarian physical activity?
  • Simcoe Muskoka walkON Survey
    • A walkON survey was conducted in order to understand the current levels of awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Simcoe Muskoka residents regarding walkable communities.
  • walkON survey
    • Questions were asked about physical activity levels in general as well as for both recreational and utilitarian purposes
    • e.g. “In a typical week in the past 3 month, how many hours did you usually spend walking to work or to school or while doing errands?’
  • Pertinent Survey Findings
    • A majority of survey respondents felt that their ability to be physically active was affected by their neighbourhood.
    • They highest percentages went to:
    • having roads, sidewalks, and pathways that were in good condition, that were connected to each other, and that were well-lit at night.
    • as well as having parks within a 5-10 minute walk from their neighbourhood.
  • Pertinent Survey Findings
    • Survey participants were asked the question, “Do you have trails or pathways within a 5-10 minute walking or cycling distance of your home?”
    • For those who answered “no”, a second question was asked about the degree to which they would support “adding trails or pathways to their neighbourhood or community”
    • Over one third (35%) of respondents do not have trails or pathways with 5-10 minutes walking or cycling distance for their home. Almost three quarters of these (75%) would support adding trails or pathways to their neighbourhood or community.
    • Over two-thirds (68%) of respondents found that having trails or pathways within a 5-10 minute walking or cycling could affect their ability to be physically active.
  • Pertinent Survey Findings
    • Survey participants were also asked whether they had ever read about or heard the term “walkable community” and 69% of the respondents had not heard or read it.
    • Having heard the term “walkable community” was not a factor in being physically active in a typical week but it could influence the number of days of physical activity. This was statistically significant and highlights the importance of awareness-raising and knowledge building initiatives.
  • Relevant Survey Recommendations
    • Partner with other agencies to add and build upon the findings of the survey
    • Conduct social marketing campaigns that highlight the concept of walkable communities, introducing the concept of walking or cycling as the principle transportation mode for common trips to locations that are taken on an almost daily basis.
    • There needs to be a shift from personal or individual action towards community or group action on behalf of improving the walkability of the neighbourhood.
    • Promote walkability surveys with community partners to facilitate the evaluation of people’s own neighbourhoods, and to identify the existence or lack of supportive infrastructure and nearby services.
  • Communications Tools
    • Include media relations, print materials, audio-visual presentations, advertising, special events, internal communication, speeches, e-communications etc.
    • What communication strategies to increase awareness in the community do you or your organizations use?
  • Communication Effectiveness
    • Communication and mass media campaigns have an important role to play in influencing community consciousness, awareness, knowledge and behaviour.
    • Use special events to build awareness and enthusiasm. Special events encourage people to try a new way of getting around, even for just one day e.g. commuter challenge, International car-free Day, International Walk to School Month, Bike to Work Week and other events tailored to fit local circumstances.
    • Recognize and reward local successes.
  • Marketing the Message: Considerations
    • Consider all population groups
    • Understand the target populations you wish to reach
    • Explain the link between health, active transportation and the environment
    • It is not about restricting the use of motorized vehicles but about enhancing healthy travel choices and opportunities
    • Transform an automobile reliant community
    • Identify links and extensions of existing bikeways, sidewalks and trails
    • Focus on a variety of settings including schools, workplaces, neighbourhoods and facilities
  • Additional Considerations
    • Private businesses can provide funds, equipment and/or expertise for special events, building projects, facility and trail construction.
    • Many provincial grant programs exist.
    • Business leaders can serve as personal ambassadors for active living.
    • Mass media are important partners for creating awareness and disseminating physical activity messages, campaigns and events.
  • Community Level Strategies to Build Awareness
    • Internal communications among peers/colleagues
    • Hosting public information sessions and workshops
    • Building support for public policy related to health and the built environment
    • Organizing local pedestrian advocacy groups
    • Influencing planning policy
    • Working with the media
  • What to Take Away
    • Know that it takes time to influence behaviour
    • but every effort moves people along stages
    • of change
    • It’s a win-win opportunity if we work together to
    • raise awareness about active transportation and walkable communities
    • Be aware of the ways in which you can support active living
    • Make it easy for residents to make healthy choices
    • Be Involved in raising awareness about active transportation
    • Speak out for changes in the community that support healthy living
  • Resources and Key Messages Found at:
    • The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit – Call Health Connection or visit www.simcoemuskokahealth.org
    • walkON Survey http://www.simcoemuskokahealth.org/Libraries/HU_Library/walkONFinalReport090827.sflb.ashx
    • Canadian Fitness & Lifestyle Research Institute http://www.cflri.ca/eng/active_transportation/index.php
    • Transport Canada – Travel Options in Small & Rural Communities
    • http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/programs/environment-urban-guidelines-practitioners-improvingtravelsrcomms2009-menu-1656.htm
    • Green Communities Canada – Active & Safe Routes School
    • http://greencommunitiescanada.org/pages/SustainableTransportation.php
    • Walk & Bike for Life http://www.8-80cities.org/
    • walkON http://www.walkon.ca/welcome
    • iCANwalk http://icanwalk.ca/
    • Physical Activity Guides/Recommendations for Various Age Groups
    • http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/pag-gap/index-eng.php
    • Green Municipal Fund
    • http://www.sustainablecommunities.fcm.ca/GMF/