• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Livable St. Louis Conference 2012 Bold Community Visions
 

Livable St. Louis Conference 2012 Bold Community Visions

on

  • 413 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
413
Views on SlideShare
413
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • In our 30 years of work, we have found that people have never really lost their craving for great civic gathering spaces. People flock to civic spaces when they want to be with other people, to share ideas or become part of the collective expression of an idea or point of view. Uptown Waterloo ’ s public square has the potential to become such a great civic place and destination for the people of this City. As a parking lot, it ’ s opportunity to become a defining place for the city is quite limited. However, in either case, the space needs to be carefully planned and designed. But more than that, to be successful it must e actively programmed and managed on an ongoing basis and funds need to be set aside for that purpose NOW. That is why most if not all public spaces fail to realize their potential. Why parks sit empty; while plazas in the middle of busy commercial districts are unused except by skateboarders and the homeless; if you build it they will come, only if there is something to do there and a comfortable place to sit while you do it!
  • We can work with Township officials on plans to infill a suburban environment
  • But if we want to help our customers have the mobility and the quality of life that they have come to expect, maybe, just maybe, we will need to start thinking about land use
  • In our 30 years of work, we have found that people have never really lost their craving for great civic gathering spaces. People flock to civic spaces when they want to be with other people, to share ideas or become part of the collective expression of an idea or point of view. Uptown Waterloo ’ s public square has the potential to become such a great civic place and destination for the people of this City. As a parking lot, it ’ s opportunity to become a defining place for the city is quite limited. However, in either case, the space needs to be carefully planned and designed. But more than that, to be successful it must e actively programmed and managed on an ongoing basis and funds need to be set aside for that purpose NOW. That is why most if not all public spaces fail to realize their potential. Why parks sit empty; while plazas in the middle of busy commercial districts are unused except by skateboarders and the homeless; if you build it they will come, only if there is something to do there and a comfortable place to sit while you do it!
  • AARP printed a two-page spread using this graphic in its September 2007 Bulletin, a monthly newspaper that is received by more than 39 million members Wide, raised sidewalks Ramps to crosswalks Raised crosswalks Pedestrian-friendly medians Resting places May include recessed bus stops Bike lanes Visible signs Advanced stop lines On-street parking
  • Key Message: This is the traditional engineering approach to roadway design. It shows very little relationship to land use context. Background Information: The engineer starts out by looking at existing or forecast traffic volume, the type of area the road is in, and its role in the highway network –through route vs. local route, degree of access control desired, etc. These characteristics are used to develop a formal functional classification for the road. General classifications include freeways, major arterials, minor arterials, collector streets, and local roads. There are divisions of these categories for urban and rural. The functional classification is used to establish the design speed and design vehicle. For example, freeways and rural arterials may be assigned a design speed of 55 mph or more. An urban collector street may be assigned a design speed of 25 to 35 mph. Design vehicle is basically whether the road is designed to readily accommodate large trucks or buses. The design speed and vehicle lead to physical requirements or guidelines for alignment, cross-section, intersection design, and roadside treatment. For example, to allow a car to safely travel at 55 mph, a curve must be a certain radius. The radius may need to be greater if the design vehicle is larger. Cross-section elements include lane widths, shoulder widths, medians, and sidewalks. Examples of roadside elements include maximum sideslope and clear zone for obstacles. Interactivity: Ask: In what ways, if any, does this approach relate a street ’ s design to its land use context? The only relation to land use is whether it is urban or rural Notes:
  • Key Message: This is the traditional engineering approach to roadway design. It shows very little relationship to land use context. Background Information: The engineer starts out by looking at existing or forecast traffic volume, the type of area the road is in, and its role in the highway network –through route vs. local route, degree of access control desired, etc. These characteristics are used to develop a formal functional classification for the road. General classifications include freeways, major arterials, minor arterials, collector streets, and local roads. There are divisions of these categories for urban and rural. The functional classification is used to establish the design speed and design vehicle. For example, freeways and rural arterials may be assigned a design speed of 55 mph or more. An urban collector street may be assigned a design speed of 25 to 35 mph. Design vehicle is basically whether the road is designed to readily accommodate large trucks or buses. The design speed and vehicle lead to physical requirements or guidelines for alignment, cross-section, intersection design, and roadside treatment. For example, to allow a car to safely travel at 55 mph, a curve must be a certain radius. The radius may need to be greater if the design vehicle is larger. Cross-section elements include lane widths, shoulder widths, medians, and sidewalks. Examples of roadside elements include maximum sideslope and clear zone for obstacles. Interactivity: Ask: In what ways, if any, does this approach relate a street ’ s design to its land use context? The only relation to land use is whether it is urban or rural Notes:
  • Requested by the Community Board in order to: curb speeding, to provide a safe, two-way bike path along the park and to reduce sidewalk bike riding.
  • Key Message: This is the traditional engineering approach to roadway design. It shows very little relationship to land use context. Background Information: The engineer starts out by looking at existing or forecast traffic volume, the type of area the road is in, and its role in the highway network –through route vs. local route, degree of access control desired, etc. These characteristics are used to develop a formal functional classification for the road. General classifications include freeways, major arterials, minor arterials, collector streets, and local roads. There are divisions of these categories for urban and rural. The functional classification is used to establish the design speed and design vehicle. For example, freeways and rural arterials may be assigned a design speed of 55 mph or more. An urban collector street may be assigned a design speed of 25 to 35 mph. Design vehicle is basically whether the road is designed to readily accommodate large trucks or buses. The design speed and vehicle lead to physical requirements or guidelines for alignment, cross-section, intersection design, and roadside treatment. For example, to allow a car to safely travel at 55 mph, a curve must be a certain radius. The radius may need to be greater if the design vehicle is larger. Cross-section elements include lane widths, shoulder widths, medians, and sidewalks. Examples of roadside elements include maximum sideslope and clear zone for obstacles. Interactivity: Ask: In what ways, if any, does this approach relate a street ’ s design to its land use context? The only relation to land use is whether it is urban or rural Notes:
  • Key Message: Network and corridor-level planning can help set the context for addressing more specific street design issues. Background Information: Network planning can occur as part of the regional and community-level visioning and planning processes, as discussed in Lessons 5 and 8. The design of the network (connectivity, spacing of arterials, etc.) has implications for the design of individual roadway segments. Network level solutions – for example, where major traffic routes go in relationship to activity centers – are the first step in establishing street-land use compatibility. Corridor visioning and planning, as discussed in Lesson 6, determines how a community wants a corridor to develop. It may include conceptual plans for street cross-sections and local road networks. Roadway design includes three distinct aspects – the traveled way, intersections, and the roadside (e.g., sidewalks and planting strips) Interactivity: Notes: Adapted from: Institute of Transportation Engineers (2006). Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban Thoroughfares for Walkable Communities: A Proposed Recommended Practice. RP-036. Washington, D.C.
  • … by putting themselves, and the going and staying needs of their bodies, in streets!
  • In our 30 years of work, we have found that people have never really lost their craving for great civic gathering spaces. People flock to civic spaces when they want to be with other people, to share ideas or become part of the collective expression of an idea or point of view. Uptown Waterloo ’ s public square has the potential to become such a great civic place and destination for the people of this City. As a parking lot, it ’ s opportunity to become a defining place for the city is quite limited. However, in either case, the space needs to be carefully planned and designed. But more than that, to be successful it must e actively programmed and managed on an ongoing basis and funds need to be set aside for that purpose NOW. That is why most if not all public spaces fail to realize their potential. Why parks sit empty; while plazas in the middle of busy commercial districts are unused except by skateboarders and the homeless; if you build it they will come, only if there is something to do there and a comfortable place to sit while you do it!
  • It is important that we think about public spaces in our community in terms of their potential to link important community institutions. Very often, these institutions operate on their own, without connecting with each other.
  • Public Spaces should bring all of these diverse institutions together! We always say “You Can’t Do it Alone,” meaning you need to work with all the nearby partners to get the help you may need, such as innovative ideas, additional financial resources or in-kind services, or volunteers to help with maintenance or short-term improvement projects. Partners also help to broaden the impact of a project by participating in activities such as joint programming, marketing, fundraising, and security. A strong partnership can also move a project forward by giving it political clout. The most obvious partners are the people and institutions that are located around a space. They have a major impact on whether a public space will be used and how it will be maintained. The outer "edges" of the public space are inextricably entwined with the "inner," or actual public space: Each is dependent on the other for its success.
  • This diagram shows the ten places and the activities that would go on in one of the places identified by Singapore stakeholder.
  • Dun Laoghaire, a suburb of Dublin, where PPS did the Power of Ten Exercise and Place and Street Audits in March of 2012. Kate, read the Dun Laoghaire blog before leaving: http://www.pps.org/how-to-turn-dun-laoghaire-around/
  • but when you get there, the only thing happening is people walking back and forth to class Exhibit on fence and/or in lawn area
  • What could be done? A stage/informal seating area Events Moveable seating
  • What could be done? Seating Flexible stage/seating area Tabling Interacting
  • Places in Harvard square... we all envision it as a world class place
  • Developed by stakeholders using POT and audit
  • An idea of how much space is available for both people AND vehicles
  • .
  • Key Message: Network and corridor-level planning can help set the context for addressing more specific street design issues. Background Information: Network planning can occur as part of the regional and community-level visioning and planning processes, as discussed in Lessons 5 and 8. The design of the network (connectivity, spacing of arterials, etc.) has implications for the design of individual roadway segments. Network level solutions – for example, where major traffic routes go in relationship to activity centers – are the first step in establishing street-land use compatibility. Corridor visioning and planning, as discussed in Lesson 6, determines how a community wants a corridor to develop. It may include conceptual plans for street cross-sections and local road networks. Roadway design includes three distinct aspects – the traveled way, intersections, and the roadside (e.g., sidewalks and planting strips) Interactivity: Notes: Adapted from: Institute of Transportation Engineers (2006). Context Sensitive Solutions in Designing Major Urban Thoroughfares for Walkable Communities: A Proposed Recommended Practice. RP-036. Washington, D.C.
  • In our 30 years of work, we have found that people have never really lost their craving for great civic gathering spaces. People flock to civic spaces when they want to be with other people, to share ideas or become part of the collective expression of an idea or point of view. Uptown Waterloo ’ s public square has the potential to become such a great civic place and destination for the people of this City. As a parking lot, it ’ s opportunity to become a defining place for the city is quite limited. However, in either case, the space needs to be carefully planned and designed. But more than that, to be successful it must e actively programmed and managed on an ongoing basis and funds need to be set aside for that purpose NOW. That is why most if not all public spaces fail to realize their potential. Why parks sit empty; while plazas in the middle of busy commercial districts are unused except by skateboarders and the homeless; if you build it they will come, only if there is something to do there and a comfortable place to sit while you do it!

Livable St. Louis Conference 2012 Bold Community Visions Livable St. Louis Conference 2012 Bold Community Visions Presentation Transcript

  • Livable St. Louis Conference 2012 Bold Community VisionsGary Toth TrailnetProject for Public Spaces October 26, 2012
  • 34 years at the New Jersey Department of Transportation5 Years Director of Transportation Initiatives at PPSInvested Career working at the community/agency interface PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES 2
  • Is this the legacy that we want to leave for our children? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACESSlide courtesy of Dan Burden
  • We have been Building Transportation ThroughCommunities, not communities through transportation PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES Slide courtesy of Dan Burden
  • Pre-Automobile Era Street design HAD to accommodate all users Relationship of land use to streets was critical for survival PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Pre-Automobile Era City streets served as public places for economic and social interaction PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Streets used to have many purposesStreet design HAD to accommodate all users PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Pieces of Community related to each other PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Graphic courtesy of Andy Singer PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • The Automobile Age The mobility provided by the automobile removed the need for those exchanges to be made in compact, mixed use cities and towns Once we could drive to access goods, employment, education and recreation, we were free to locate those uses in distant and specialized locations…and we did PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Slide courtesy of Barbara Lawrence, NJ FutureThe needs of the motoring public supersede all other contexts PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • We stopped viewing Streets as Places PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Building communities is not our business PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Focus on high speed Speed / Proximity Balance •Speed necessary at region and above mobility •Proximity viable option in sub-region Proximity Speed AccessibilitySlide Courtesy of Chris Sinclair, Renaissance Planning Group PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACESSlide courtesy of Ian Lockwood, Glatting Jackson
  • A successful street? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Is This a Successful Street? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Is this Sustainable? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Slide courtesy of Tim Jackson, Glatting Jackson PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • So what do we do? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Building Community ThroughTransportation: Streets as Places
  • Two Steps to Fully Complete Our Streets Reallocate space and adjust speeds Address Land Use and Placemaking! PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Complete Streets AARP Bulletin A Complete Street is safe, comfortable & convenient for travel by automobile, foot, bicycle, & transit regardless of age or ability PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Traditional Highway Design ApproachTraffic Volume + Area Type (urban, rural) + Role in Network Functional Classification Design Speed + Design Vehicle Alignment + Cross-Section + Intersection + Roadside PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Complete StreetsAn Approach for Accomodating All Users Cars Bikes BusesPedestrians Trucks/freight Alignment + Cross-Section + Intersection + Roadside PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Two Steps to Fully Complete Our Streets Reallocate space and adjust speeds Address Land Use and Placemaking! PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Is this a Complete Street? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Is this a Complete Street? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Two Steps to Fully Complete Our Streets  Reallocate space and adjust speeds  Address Land Use and Placemaking! PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Proposed x-section alternatives on Foothill Blvd – S sidesoft-surface trail section curb to median bike andlane lane Sidewalk ½Sidewalk, Sidewalk and south (school) side Sidewalk Soft surface trail and bike bike landscape buffer, lane shy zone shy zone shy zone planting 13’ 6’ 18’ 11’ 6’ 6’ 11’ 11.5’ 11.5’ median/CTL median/CTL median/CTL PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES new curb bike travel travel new curb new curb bike bike travel travel travel
  • 2nd Avenue, South PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES Photomorph courtesy of Dan Burden
  • Cahaba Road PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES Photomorph courtesy of Dan Burden
  • “This plan lays out a vision for New York City of improved mobility, safer streets and reduced impact on global climate, all resulting in a world class quality of life.” Safety Mobility World Class Streets Infrastructure Greening Global Leadership Customer ServiceApril, 2008Sustainable Streets Strategic Plan PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACEShttp://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/about/stratplan.shtml
  • Images: NYC DOT Presentation to Manhattan CB8, PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACEShttp://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/about/currentproj.shtml#complete
  • Flushing Ave, Brooklyn 9th Ave, Manhattan PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACESLower East Side, Manhattan Smith Street, Brooklyn
  • West Side Highway, Manhattan Queens Boulevard, Queens PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACESProspect Park West, Brooklyn Sands Street, Brooklyn
  • Prospect Park West before afterImage: NYC DOT PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACEShttp://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/bicyclists/prospectparkwest.shtml
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACESProspect Park West, Brooklyn, NY
  • Long BeachConnecting the Downtown via Complete Streets PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Philadelphia Connecting the Downtown via Complete Streets Pine Street PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Philadelphia Connecting the Downtown via Complete Streets Spruce Street
  • Philadelphia Connecting the Downtown via Complete Streets Pine Street
  • Philadelphia Connecting the Downtown via Complete Streets Pine Street
  • Is this a Complete Street? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • A Complete Street is safe, comfortable &convenient for travel by automobile, foot, bicycle, & transit regardless of age or ability PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Complete StreetsAn Approach for Accomodating All Users Cars Bikes BusesPedestrians Trucks/freight Alignment + Cross-Section + Intersection + Roadside PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Placed Based Approach Corridor/Community Place RoadwayTraveled Way Intersections Roadside PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Two Steps to Fully Complete Our Streets Reallocate space and adjust speeds Address Land Use and Placemaking! PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Characteristics of Streets as Places:Design street elementsand adjacent buildingsfor the human scaleBalances the going andstaying needs of usersSupport and encourageactivities anddestinations PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Characteristics of Streets as Places:Provide a feeling ofsafetyInvite activities on bothsides of the streetReward slowmovement by loweringspeeds PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Characteristics ofStreets as Places:Reflect communityidentityMove communitytowards localsustainabilityShow a sense ofownership PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Principles • Compactness, connectivity, completeness & continuity • Buildings should complete “the outdoor room” of the street • Provide a mix of land uses Outdoor room Outdoor room of the street of the streetMade possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  • Distribute land uses for easy access from homes & jobs • Create social spaces where generations can mix • Ground floors should be active and transparent on commercial streetsMade possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  • • Ground floors should allow for privacy while layering landscape, and outdoor spaces on residential streets • Setbacks will vary based on the street type and land use • Make the land use changes necessary with specific plans or other tools to reinforce the places the community desiresMade possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  • Photomorph courtesy of Dan Burden PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Medians and pedestrian improvements Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International34 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Continue public improvements Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International35 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Mixed-use infill development Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International36 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Continue infill development Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International37 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Landscape matures over time Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International38 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Transforming ‘Gasoline Alley’ Add transit service as market grows Slide courtesy of Harrison Rue and ICF International39 PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • State Route 27 Edison, NJ PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • What is Placemaking?
  • What is Placemaking? Placemaking is a dynamic human function: it is an act of liberation, of staking claim, and of beautification; it is true human empowerment. Placemaking is turning a neighborhood, town or city from a place you can’t wait to get through to one you never want to leave. PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • “Placemaking” is an overarching idea and a hands-on tool for improving a Neighborhood, City or Region . It has the potential to be one of the most transformative ideas of this century Metropolitan Planning Council
  • Social public spaces “are built of a setof basics…” Food Seating Triangulation Sun/Shade Places to People Watch …it doesn’t take much… PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Key AttributesWhat Makes a Great Place? Intangibles Measurements street life business ownership evening use property values volunteerism land-use patterns Fun retail sales Welcoming Cooperative Active Vital Neighborly Special Real sociability uses & activities PLACE access & linkages comfort & image Connected Safe Walkable Charm Clean Convenient Attractive Accessible Historic crime stats transit usage sanitation rating pedestrian activity building conditions parking usage patterns environmental data
  • The Benefits of Places-Place Governance Nurtures & Defines Community Builds & Supports the Identity Fosters More Frequent & Local Economy • Greater community organization Meaningful Interaction • Sense of dedication & volunteerism • Improved sociability• Small-scale entrepreneurship • Perpetuation of integrity & values • Cultural exposure & interaction• More quality goods available • “Mutual coercion, mutually agreed-upon” • Exchange & preservation of information,• Higher real estate values • Reduced necessity for municipal control wisdom & values• Local ownership, local value • Self-managing • Bolstered barter system• More desirable jobs • Reduced race & class barriers• Increased currency velocity • Feeling of interconnection• Greater tax revenue• Reduced need for municipal services Place Draws a More Diverse Population Creates Improved • More women, elderly, and children Accessibility • Greater ethnic & cultural pluralism • More walkable Promotes Public Health • Support for wider range of activities & uses • New service, retail and customer niches • Safe for pedestrians • Compatible with public transit & Comfort • Variation & character in built environment • Less crime • Instilled confidence to create one’s reality • Reduced need for cars & parking • More efficient use of time & money • More outdoor physical activity • Visually attractive destinations • Generally stimulating • Greater connections between uses • Sense of belonging • Improved environmental quality • Feeling of freedom and limitlessness
  • Communities Today Offices Churches Hospital Theatres/Coffee MuseumsShops Community Parks Center Transit Libraries Schools City Hall
  • Sustainable Communities of the Future Churches Schools City Hall Community CentersLibraries Civic Squares Community Gathering Theatres/ Museums Coffee Spaces/Parks Shops Offices Hospitals Transit
  • Local Placemaking Opportunities Main StreetsTransportation & Local streets and roadsDowntowns Bus stops Train Stations Parks (greenways, recreation, play areas)Parks & Squares Plazas & squares (performances, events) Markets Waterfronts Libraries and hospitalsCivic Institutions Civic buildings Schools (universities, primary schools) Religious institutions Cultural institutions (theaters, museums)Private development Mixed-use – housing, retail and office
  • Why don’t we have better Public Spaces today? • Fear• Narrow Development Goals • Project-driven vs. Place- driven Planning • Discipline-Based Planning/Design vs. Community-Based Placemaking • Government Structure
  • Blank walls are an end in themselves. They declare the supremacy of architecture over humanity, of a building over a person.Museum of Modern Art - NYC
  • Benches are artifacts, the purpose of which is to punctuatearchitectural photographs. They are not so good for sitting.
  • “What attracts people most it would appear, is other people.”
  • One of the best things about water is the look and feelof it…It’s not right to put water before people and thenkeep them away from it.
  • If you want to seed a place with activity, put out food.
  • If no one wants to goout to the Park, no oneis going to stop them. ─ Yogi Berra
  • It’s hard for people to realize that creating a place ismore important than design. ─ PPS
  • Project/Discipline Driven Approach
  • Each profession hasbecome its ownaudience. -Pope Coleman
  • When you focus on a place,you do everything differently
  • Community/Place Driven Approach
  • 11 Principles of Creating Great Public Spaces 1. The community is the expertUnderlying Ideas 2. You are creating a place not just a design 3. You can’t do it alone 4. They always say it can’t be donePlanning & Outreach 5. You can see a lot just by observingTechniques 6. Develop a placemaking visionTranslating Ideas Into 7. Power of 10/TriangulationAction 8. Form supports function 9. Lighter, Quicker, CheaperImplementation 10. Money is not the issue 11. You are never finished
  • Place Based Transportation Process Destination Mapping aka Power of Ten Route Mapping aka Connectivity Exercise Place Audits Street Audits Lighter Quicker Cheaper Interventions
  • The Power of TenRegion/City/Town/N eighborhood 10+ destinations Destinations 10+ places 10+ things to do Place Layering of uses to create synergy (Triangulation) = District
  • Place Map App - Opportunities
  • San Antonio- NPR Partnership
  • Singapore - 10 Sites PROJECT
  • Route Mapping
  • Route Mapping
  • Dun Laoghaire, Ireland
  • Connectivity BarriersBrighton Boulevard Denver
  • Place and Street Audits
  • Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper Activation Events Comfort, Amenities & Public Art Interim Public Spaces Light Development PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Power of Ten in Harvard Yard
  • The South Fence - Connection to Harvard Yard PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • The “Great Lawn” PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • The “Piazza” PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Power of Ten 7. Entrance to the Science Center 1. Gateway between the Plaza and 8. Tanner Fountain Harvard Yard 9. Library Arcade 2. The South Fence and connection 10. NE Plaza Entrance to Harvard Yard 11. Loker Bar and Beer Garden 3. NW Plaza Entrance 12. Memorial Walk 4. The “Great Lawn” 13. Main Walkway 5. Science Center Outdoor Terrace 14. Overlooks 6. The “Piazza” PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 6 Weeks Later PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Better Blocks Philadelphia October, 2011 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Better Blocks Philadelphia October, 2011 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Better Blocks Philadelphia October, 2011 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Better Blocks Philadelphia October, 2011 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Market Street Philadelphia November, 2011 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Plaza Experiment PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Rockwell Avenue, Cleveland Pop up Bike Lane
  • Rockwell Avenue, Cleveland Pop up Bike Lane
  • Rockwell Avenue, Cleveland Pop up Bike Lane
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Levels of ServiceThe Wrong Tools for Urban Streets? PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • Levels of ServiceThe Wrong Tools for Urban Streets? Text www.pps.org/ PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • We have been planning the pieces not the whole Slide Courtesy of John Nordquist, CNU
  • No One Sees the Big PictureSlide courtesy of Leigh Lane
  • A successful street?
  • A successful street?
  • A successful building?
  • A successful community?
  • Upside Down Planning Placed Based Approach Corridor/Community PlaceArchitecture Roadways Buildings Parking Institutions Markets
  • http://www.pps.org/pdf/bookstore/How_to_Engage_Your_Transportation_Agency_AARP.pdf Gary Toth Director of Transportation Initiatives Project for Public Spaces 609-397-3885 Gtoth@pps.org PROJECT FOR PUBLICSPACES PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES