• Save
Food Security & Land Security: Saving the Small Farm
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Food Security & Land Security: Saving the Small Farm

on

  • 482 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
482
Views on SlideShare
482
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Not just the opposite of hunger; Definition by World Food Summit of 1996.Food security is a complex issue, linked not only to public health, but also to economic development, the environment, and trade. 
  • Is similar to land tenurethe relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, “land” is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.
  • About an acre/minute
  • When we announced that EarthDance bought the farm!
  • Cedar Lakes Conservation Foundation, Inc. was founded in 1974 and is the oldest land trust of its kind in the State of Wisconsin.  Its volunteer leadership was instrumental to the formation of Gathering Waters Conservancy and using the land trust model as an important framework to coordinate and support statewide land conservation efforts.  It is fair to say that many of our State’s land trusts were propagated from the seeds of land conservation practice planted and cultivated by CLCF in Wisconsin. Activities of CLCF continue to make significant contributions to the preservation and protection of fragile wetlands, woodlands and natural areas in Washington County – one of the most rapidly developing areas in the State.  Cumulatively, approximately 2500 acres of pristine land has been permanently protected, creating a lasting legacy of natural beauty that will remain undeveloped for the benefit of future generations.  And, it’s not just any land.  CLCF’s area of concentration includes the headwaters and watersheds of Gilbert Lake, Big Cedar Lake, Little Cedar Lake, and Cedar Creek.  These watersheds drain into the Milwaukee River and eventually reach Lake Michigan. In a 34 year time frame, in excess of 95,000 native trees and other native plant species have been planted, storm water retention ponds have been constructed, and annual educational events have been hosted by CLCF.  Of significance, the DNR and other local governmental units enthusiastically attest to the positive impact CLCF has had on the improvement of water quality in the local lakes and surrounding watershed areas.  Participation in the work of CLCF is at an all-time high and committed volunteers generated by the organization continue to engage in many worthwhile projects.  Experienced CLCF volunteers mentor new recruits, including youth groups, to develop the next generation of conservationists. None of this work would be possible without charitable contributions from individuals and organizations that share a common vision for the work of CLCF.  Each year, benefits generated by the organization’s work multiply incalculably.  We hope you will determine the work of the Cedar Lakes Conservation Foundation worthy of your continued support!  Contributions to the organization are tax deductible as provided by law.  Regular publications keep members abreast of progress, events, and volunteer opportunities.
  • FRPP is a voluntary program that helps farmers and ranchers keep their land in agriculture. The program provides matching funds to state, tribal, or local gov’ts, or NGOs with farmland protection programs (such as land trust orgs) to purchase conservation easements (i.e. development rights are purchased).
  • These are tools and techniques that state and local governments are using to protect farmland and supportthe economic viability of agriculture. Some of thetechniques result in programs that are enactedand administered at the state level, others areused primarily by local governments. Sometimes,municipal governments adapt and strengthenstate laws to meet unique local needs.
  • Some ofthe most effective farmland protection programscombine regulatory and incentive-based strategies.

Food Security & Land Security: Saving the Small Farm Food Security & Land Security: Saving the Small Farm Presentation Transcript

  • Food Security & Land Security: Saving the Small Farm MOLLY ROCKAMANN OCTOBER 26, 2012 LIVABLE ST. LOUIS CONFERENCE
  • Introduction
  • Food Security “WHEN ALL PEOPLE AT ALL TIMESHAVE ACCESS TO SUFFICIENT, SAFE, NUTRITIOUS FOOD TO MAINTAIN A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE LIFE” View slide
  • Land Security“WHEN ALL PEOPLE AT ALL TIMES HAVE ACCESS TO SUFFICIENT, PROTECTED, FERTILE LAND TO MAINTAIN A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE LIVELIHOOD” View slide
  • Why Save Farms? TODAY, MORE THAN 75 PERCENT OFAMERICAS FRUITS, VEGETABLES, ANDDAIRY PRODUCTS ARE PRODUCED ON URBAN-EDGE FARMS THAT ARE THREATENED BY SPRAWLING DEVELOPMENT.
  • Fresh Food Grown on the Urban Fringe
  • Why Save Farms?EACH YEAR AMERICA LOSES MORE THAN ONE MILLION ACRES OF FARMLAND
  • Why Save Farms? "In addition to providing a source of freshfood, farmland supplies habitat for wildlife, green openspace, and filters for clean air and water. By identifying and protecting our best agricultural land, we can safeguard the family farms and farm businesses that drive local economies.” - Ralph Grossi, president of American Farmland Trust
  • Why Save Farms? Although farms, forests, and other open lands generate less revenue per acre than land devoted to housing development, these lands require less in expenditure for infrastructure and services. When farmland is removed from production, it is a loss to the entire community.
  • Tools for Farmland PreservationThe Top Five “P”s of Farmland Preservation:1. Profitability2. Partnerships3. People (Community)4. Political Will5. Planning
  • Profitability & Preservation Beginning farmers are looking for land to farm Existing farms = huge asset, but also huge expense Priced at their ag value (vs market value), much more affordable Capital can go towards other start-up costs
  • Organizational History
  • Organizational History
  • Agricultural Conservation Easement Agricultural easement programs  Farm owner can permanently protect the land from nonfarm development without giving up ownership.  Through an agreement between the landowner and a land trust or the local, state, or federal government with terms that are binding on present and future landowners.  Farm owner retains most rights to the land and can sell it or pass it on to heirs.  However, the donated land cannot legally be used for anything other than agriculture.  Easements are individually written; there are templates, but they are not all the same. Can include farm affordability
  • Organizational History
  • Tools for Farmland PreservationThe Top Five “P”s of Farmland Preservation:1. Profitability2. Partnerships3. People (Community)4. Political Will5. Planning
  • Government Assistance Farm & Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP)  A voluntary program that provides matching funds to purchase conservation easements  Requires that over 50% of the soils are rated as “prime” farmland  The land must:  Be privately owned  Be facing development pressure  Be large enough to sustain agricultural production  Be adjacent to other agricultural parcels  Have an NRCS conservation plan  Have a pending offer for a conservation easement with a qualifying entity (i.e. a land trust with a conservation easement program)
  • Other Tools for Farmland Protection Agricultural District Programs Agricultural Protection Zoning Cluster Zoning Comprehensive Planning Conservation Easements Executive Orders Farm Viability Programs
  • Other Tools for Farmland Protection cont’d. Growth Management Laws Mitigation Laws & Policies Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easement Programs (PACE) Right-to-Farm Laws Tax Relief  Circuit Breaker Tax Relief Credits  Differential Assessment Transfer of Development Rights
  • • Farmland protection toolbox fact sheet• Model agricultural conservation easement with option to purchase• American Farmland Trust• Equity Trust