Sustainability&Industrial Lands Report Eis2011

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A Local Government Perspective on Canada\'s Industrial Lands - Survey of 143 Organizations

A Local Government Perspective on Canada\'s Industrial Lands - Survey of 143 Organizations

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  • 1. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial LandsCompiled March 2011 by Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd.                       www.ecoindustrial.ca    604‐737‐8506
  • 2. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: iiA Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands     We would like to thank Takt-Etik Consultants for their assistance in translating the survey into French and distributing it within Québec.The following copyright notice "Copyright 2011, Eco-IndustrialSolutions Ltd. All rights reserved." must be applied to any text orgraphic material referenced from this report.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 3. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: iiiA Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Letter From EIS Industrial lands (also known as “employment lands”) are essential to the continued growth of the Canadian economy. Looking back over the ten years since Eco-Industrial Solutions was founded, we have seen a dramatic shift towards sustainability within municipal development and planning processes. At the same time, we recognize that there is room for improvement in the comprehensive tracking and monitoring of sustainablilty in our industrial lands. To better understand the current issues facing Canada’s industrial lands, we decided to survey municipalities and government authorities across the country. We clearly hit a hot topic, as we received responses from 143 different organizations during the brief survey period. The recent recession combined with increasing pressure to meet sustainability objectives has left many communities feeling challenged to meet their economic, environmental, and social objectives within their industrial lands. But as we also found in the survey results and have seen with our own clients, many communities have found creative and progressive ways to ensure that their industrial lands continue to provide meaningful jobs creation while being part of the overall sustainable community. We hope that this snapshot of Canada’s industrial lands will spur knowledge transfer and benchmarking between Canadian communities. We also hope that as we repeat this survey in future years, we will see the issues change and we’ll hear Eco-Industrial Solutions more and more success stories. 2001-2011: Ultimately, it’s in all our interests to help Canada’s industrial Celebrating 10 years lands continue to improve their competitiveness and meet of Global Eco-Industrial Leadership sustainability objectives. Sincerely, Tracy Casavant President & CEO, Eco-Industrial Solutions Ltd. Suite 501 - 318 Homer St Vancouver, BC Canada V6B 2V2 E: tracy@ecoindustrial.ca T: 604.737.8506 ext 106 F: 604.648.8439© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 4. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: ivA Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  This page intentionally blank to faciliate double-sided printing.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 5. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: vA Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Executive SummaryTo better understand the current issues Addressing the Issuesfacing Canada’s industrial lands, Eco-Industrial Solutions Ltd. undertook a Clearly, addressing our infrastructurenation-wide survey in February of 2011. deficit and supporting better land use143 organizations from 10 provinces and planning are key to ensuring that1 territory were represented in the survey. Canada’s industrial lands continue to be competitive, generate jobs, and remain community assets even as communitiesTop 5 issues - existing industrial strive to meet a growing list oflands sustainability objectives. In turn, this will support business retnetion and attraction.1. Business retention/ attraction2. Ecologically sensitive areas nearby or For existing lands, comprehensive within sustainability-driven revitalization / retrofits can reduce demand for3. Inefficient land use infrastructure and impacts on nearby4. Conflicting adjacent land uses lands. For existing and future industrial lands, strong local government policy and5. Inefficient water or sewer capacity leadership is key. For the one-quarter of respondents who own their futureTop 5 issues - future industrial industrial lands, they can lead bylands developing those lands as eco-industrial parks or similar.1. Business attraction2. Insufficient water/sewer capacity While many communities report some progress, there is clearly much work to be3. Ecologically sensitive areas within or done to ensure that Canada’s industrial nearby lands become part of a sustainable4. Lack of Transportation Access (with community. ‘Soft’ investments are Traffic Congestion being a huge issue needed to develop appropriate policy and for urban and suburban respondents) support sustainability-driven revitalization and business attraction / retention efforts,5. Conflicting nearby land uses work which often requires outside expertise to complete. ‘Hard’ investmentsTop 5 new objectives in the next are needed to not just replacetwo years: infrastructure, but replace it with infrastructure that further helps1. Upgrade water/sewer capacity businesses to operate more efficiently and reduce their impact on the environment.2. Encourage infill or intensification3. Improve transportation access We hope that subsequent surveys show that these investments are being made, or4. Attract clean, ‘green’ business Canada risks its industrial lands losing5. Encourage green buildings competitiveness and hampering national efforts to achieve sustainable communities© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 6. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: viA Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands    Table of Contents Introduction Part One: Participant Profile Part Two: Current Status Part Three: Future Plans Part Four: Conclusion© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 7. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 1A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Introduction This report presents the results of a nation-wide survey targeting local governments, First Nations, and port and airport authorities. The survey was designed to uncover how local governments view their industrial lands, and if sustainability concepts are reflected in the issues facing industrial lands, as well as in plans to address those issues. The results present an interesting snapshot of key issues facing Canada’s industrial lands. In addition, respondents reported on their intention to address issues within their industrial lands in the next two years. By repeating this survey, we will be able to track whether and how key issues are being addressed. Hopefully, this and future snapshots of Canada’s industrial lands will support increased knowledge transfer and benchmarking between Canadian municipalities and will help Canada’s industrial lands continue evolving to be more competitive and to meet sustainability objectives. This report is formatted as follows: Part One: An overview of survey respondents and their Participant Profile organizations including size and location. Part Two: The existing status of developed and undeveloped Current Status industrial lands and issues facing these lands. Part Three: Barriers to and trends for future industrial Future Plans development. Part Four: Summary of survey and overview of implications. Conclusion© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 8. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 2A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Part One:  83% represented municipal governmentParticipant Profile Response Type of Organization Percent Municipal government 83% Regional government 7% Provincial government 2% Port or airport authority 4% First Nation < 1% Other 3% Who Responded?  Most respondents represented either Planning or 143 organizations Economic Development functions from 10 provinces Function of Respondents and 1 territory Administration Environment/ 17% Sustainability 5% Planning 40% Economic Development 34% Public Works/ Engineering 4%  46% see their communities as rural, while 60% represent communities of less than 10,000 people. Type of Community Community Size Remote More than 1,000,000 5 4% 500,001 to 1,000,000 6 250,001 to 500,000 5 Population 100,001 to 250,000 14 50,001 to 100,000 15 Urban 28 Rural 20,001 to 50,000 35% 46% 10,001 to 20,000 18 5,001 to 10,000 23 Less than 5000 37 Suburban 0 10 20 30 40 50 15% Response Count© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 9. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 3A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Who Responded?1 British Columbia Ministry Columbia Shuswap Regional Sault Ste Marie North of Forests District Planning Board  The survey Belledune Port Authority Bruce Peninsula Park Corporation of Delta County of Frontenac Rural Municipality of Woodlands represents at Calgary First Nation County of Stettler No. 6 Saint John Airport Inc Camrose County County of Wellington South Nation Conservation Cariboo Regional District Dawson City Authority least* 119,000 Chalottetown City of Abbotsford District of Clearwater District of Kent Strathcona County Sturgeon County acres of City of Airdrie City of Beaconsfield District of Kitimat District of Lunenburg Town of Ajax Town of Aylmer developed City of Brampton District of North Vancouver Town of Beresford City of Brandon District of Sechelt Town of Bonnyville City of Brantford Halifax Regional Municipality Town of Bridgetown industrial lands City of Brockville City of Brooks Killarney Kneehill County Town of Caledon Town of Carman & RM of and 130,000 acres City of Calgary City of Coquitlam Lac La Biche County Lanark County Dufferin Town of Creston of undeveloped City of Cote Saint Luc Local Government of Pinawa Town of Dalhousie City of Dauphin Loyalist Township Town of Davidson City of Fort Saskatchewan Manitoba Government Town of East Gwillimbury industrial lands City of Fort St John City of Greater Sudbury Metro Vancouver Miramichi Regional Economic Town of Espanola Town of Hearst across Canada. City of Kelowna City of Kitchener Development Agency Municipal District of Big Lakes Town of Hinton Town of Innisfail City of Leduc Municipal District of Town of Kentville City of Lethbridge Greenview No. 16 Town of Kindersley City of London Municipal District of Peace No. Town of Ladysmith City of Melfort 135 Town of Macklin City of Moncton Municipality of East Hants Town of Milton City of Montreal Municipality of Killarney Town of Nackawic City of Mount Pearl Turtle- Mountain Town of Neepawa City of North Vancouver Municipality of Northern Bruce Town of Okotoks City of Oshawa Peninsula Town of Oliver City of Pickering Municipality of the District of Town of Penhold *50 respondents answered ‘don’t City of Quebec Chester Town of Sackville know’ for the amount of industrial City of Richmond Municipality of the District of Town of Shaunavon land in their community. City of Salaberry-de- Guysborough Town of Shelburne Valleyfield Municipality of Wawa Town of Smithers City of Sault Ste. Marie Municipality of Yarmouth Town of Stonewall City of Selkirk Nicola Valley (Merritt) Town of Swan River City of Spruce Grove Opportunity Town of Tillsonburg City of St. Thomas Paintearth County Town of Tisdale City of Steinbach Pearson Int. Airport Town of Tracadie-Sheila City of Stratford Port Alberni Port Authority Town of Unity City of Surrey Red Deer County Town of Wynyard City of Swift Current Regional District Fraser Fort Township of Lake of Bays City of Terrace George Upper Rawdon (East Hants) City of Thorold Regional District of Central Village of Paquetville City of Vancouver Okanagan Village of Salisbury City of Whitehorse Regional District of Nanaimo West Hants City of Winkler Regional Municipality of Yarmouth Argyle Barrington City of Woodstock Durham District Planning Clear Hills County Commission Distribution of Survey Respondents – All Across the Country!                                                                        1  Provided complete surveys © Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 10. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 4A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Part Two:  The biggest issue facing existing industrial lands? Business retention and attractionCurrent Status  Land use issues – ecologically sensitive areas, inefficient land use, and conflicting adjacent land uses are the next biggest issuesIssues Facing Currently Developed (and/or Partially Developed) Industrial Lands Business ret ent ion / att ract ion Ecologically sensit ive areas wit hin or nearby Inef f icient land use Conf lict ing adjacent land uses Insuf f icient wat er / sewer capacit y Dont know Lack of transportat ion access Old, outdat ed building st ock Traff ic congest ion St ormwat er qualit y Insuf f icient land / Brownf ield I ssue Cost of I nf rast ruct ure and land Employee retent ion I nsuff icient solid wast e management / diversion G roundwat er qualit y Ot her I nsuff icient energy capacit y Wast ewat er qualit y Non-greenhouse gas air emissions G reenhouse gas emissions 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%Top 5 CurrentIssues  Insufficient water and sewer capacity rounds out the top 5. Sustainabilty objectives should include reducing the demand for water via recycling and1. Business retention/ conservation and even the use of reclaimed attraction wastewater. Managing demand could help stretch2. Ecologically sensitive capacity further areas nearby or within  The issue of least concern? Surprisingly, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from industrial3. Inefficient land use lands. With at least 213 municipal Partners for4. Conflicting adjacent Climate Protection working to reduce GHG land uses emissions2, are municipalities missing an5. Inefficient water or opportunity to engage business in GHG reduction sewer capacity activities?                                                                        2  Federation of Canadian Municipalities © Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 11. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 5A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Is there an Urban / Rural Divide?  Yes. The issues concerning suburban and urban municipalities are fairly similar. For rural communities, business retention / attraction is a key challenge. Business ret ention / at traction Conf licting adjacent land uses D ont know Ecologically sensit ive areas within or nearby I nsuff icient wat er / sewer capacit y Inef ficient land use Lack of transportation access Old, out dat ed building stock Stormwater qualit y Rural & Remote (50%) Employee retention Urban (35%)Insuff icient solid wast e management / diversion Suburban (15%) G roundwater qualit y Non-greenhouse gas air emissions Wastewater qualit y Traffic congestion I nsuff icient land / Brownfield Issue Insuf ficient energy capacit y Cost of I nfrastruct ure and land Other G reenhouse gas emissions 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Current Issues Facing Existing Industrial Lands By Community Type© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 12. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 6A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Top 5 Objectives Already  The Official Plan (or equivalent) is the topin Existing Policies tool used by local governments to set1. Upgrade water/sewer sustaiability objectives for their industrial capacity lands2. Encourage infill or intensification  Very few are leveraging Industrial Land3. Improve transportation Strategies or Community Energy Plans to access promote sustainability in their industrial lands4. Reduce energy consumption and/or increase energy Offic ial Co m m unity Plan, Develo pm ent Plan, efficiency Planning Strategy o r equivalent5. Attract clean technology, Zo ning / Land Us e Bylaw renewable energy and/or green business Ec o no m ic Develo pm ent Strategy Design / Develo pm ent GuidelinesRecall that insufficient water/ sewer capacity was Integrated Co m m unity Sustainability Planactually the fifth most Indus trial Land Strategypressing issue! Do nt k no w Green Building Strategy Co mm unity Energy Plan Enviro nm ental M as ter Plan Other 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%Case Study: Pearson Eco-Business Zone Policy ToolkitThe Toronto Region Conservation Authority, • Primers – 1-2 page briefings on aGreater Toronto Airport Authority, and Cities of number of topics, such as how staff canToronto, Mississauga, and Brampton are use the development permit powers insupporting the creation of the Pearson Eco- Ontario to support eco-business activityBusiness Zone - an internationally recognized and an overview of all allowable incentivecommunity known for its competitive, high tools in Ontario;performance and eco-friendly business climate. • Policy templates / language, including aThe Pearson Eco-Business Zone includes over glossary of standardized eco-industrial12,000 hectares of employment lands and is terms and definitions; Official Planhome to over 12,000 businesses surrounding policies; and principles for developmentthe Toronto Pearson International Airport. guidelines;An Eco-Business Zone Toolkit has been • Staff training modules.developed for the local government partners,incorporating extensive multi-departmental A number of larger spin-off projects wereconsultation and containing: also identified, such as the need for a comprehensive eco-industrial technical• Communication materials to help staff from resource directory for staff and for the all departments understand “what’s in it for municipal partners to work together to lobby them” as well as template PowerPoint® the Province for building code changes. slides to assist staff in making presentations to Council, the community, or even other staff;© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 13. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 9A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Part Three:  Just over half of the undeveloped industrial lands are owned by multiple land owners,Future Plans which represents a challenge to cohesive future sustainable development. StrongTop 5 Issues Facing sustainability policy will be needed.Undeveloped  Approximately one quarter of theIndustrial Lands undeveloped industrial lands are owned by the local government/organization, putting1. Business attraction these organizations in a good position to2. Insufficient demonstrate sustainability leadership. water/sewer capacity  Business attraction is the biggest issue facing3. Ecologically sensitive future industrial lands. Nearly twice as many areas within or respondents considered this an issue for nearby future lands compared to existing lands.4. Lack of  Insufficient water, sewer and transportation Transportation infrastructure also make the top 5. Access5. Conflicting land uses Issues Facing Undeveloped Industrial Lands Business at t ract ion I nsuf f icient wat er / sewer capacit y Ecologically sensit ive areas wit hin or nearby Lack of t ransport at ion access Conf lict ing adjacent land uses Pot ent ial aest het ics of indust rial development Employee at t ract ion Dont know Cost t o service & Pressure f orm ot her use sect ors Pot ent ial st ormwat er qualit y Traf f ic congest ion Pot ent ial groundwat er qualit y Pot ent ial wast ewat er qualit y Ot her I ncreasing solid wast e management / diversion Mult i-owner / I nsuf f icient land size I nsuf f icient energy capacit y Land locat ion / Need Rezoning I ncreasing non-greenhouse gas air emissions I ncreasing greenhouse gas emissions 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50%© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 14. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 10A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Is there an Urban / Rural Divide?  Yes again, at least for some issues. For rural communities, business retention / attraction is a key challenge. Interestingly, the potential aesthetics of future industrial development is a much greater concern in urban areas. Biggest Issues Facing Undeveloped Industrial Lands by Community Type Business attraction Insufficient water / sewer capacity Conf licting adjacent land uses Ecologically sensit ive areas within or nearby Lack of transport ation access Potential aest hetics of industrial development Employee attraction Potential groundwater quality Dont know Potent ial st ormwater quality Rural & Remote (50%) Potent ial wastewater quality Urban (35%) Suburban (15%) Cost to service & Pressure form other use sectors Increasing solid wast e management / diversion Other Traffic congestion Insufficient energy capacity Increasing non-greenhouse gas air emissions Land location / Need Rezoning Increasing greenhouse gas emissions Mult i-owner / Insufficient land size 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 15. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 11A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Top 3 New How will issues with future industrialSustainability lands be addressed?Objectives  33% of respondents indicated that they don’tAnticipated* know what new sustainability objectives are planned in the next two years. This may have1. Upgrade been a reflection of their job position or a water/sewer general lack of clear objectives pertaining to capacity industrial lands.2. Encourage infill or intensification  33% of organizations plan to set objecitves to3. Improve address insufficient water/sewer capacity in transportation the next two years, which correlates to one of access the top issues facing industrial lands.*after ‘don’t know’  30% of respondents plan to ecourage infill or intensification. New Sustainability Objectives Anticpated in the Next Two Years Dont know Upgrade water / sewer capacit y Encourage inf ill or int ensif ication I mprove transport at ion access At tract clean t echnology, renewable energy, and/or green business Encourage new green buildings Reduce energy consumption and/or increase energy eff iciency Reduce wat er use and wastewater generation from businesses Launch a business ret ention init iat ive Redevelop brownf ields int o higher use industrial lands Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from businesses Restore ecological or natural heritage f eat ures Encourage by-product exchange / synergy Achieve green building retrof its Reduce non-greenhouse gas air emissions from businesses Reduce wat erborne pollution from businesses Ot hers 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 16. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 12A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Part Four: What are the Issues? Conclusion The top 5 issues facing existing industrial lands are:“…cities are facing aninfrastructure deficit 6. Business retention/ attractioncurrently pegged at 7. Ecologically sensitive areas nearby or$123-billion, a price tag withinno degree of property- 8. Inefficient land usetax hikes can hope to 9. Conflicting adjacent land usescover.” 10. Inefficient water or sewer capacityGlobe and Mail, Mar 17, 2011“Canada’s big-city mayors are The top 5 issues facing future industrial landswondering: After the stimulus,what’s next?” by Siri Agrell are: 1. Business attraction 2. Insufficient water/sewer capacity 3. Ecologically sensitive areas within or nearby 4. Lack of Transportation Access (with Traffic Congestion being a huge issue for urban and suburban respondents) 5. Conflicting land uses Addressing the Issues Clearly, addressing our infrastructure deficit and supporting better land use planning are key to ensuring that Canada’s industrial lands continue to be competitive, generate jobs, and remain community assets even as communities strive to meet a growing list of sustainability objectives. Ensuring that Canada’s industrial lands are well-planned, efficient, and properly serviced will in turn help communities attract and retain business, although other measures are likely required.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 17. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 13A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands Setting Sustainable Communities have indicated that they intendObjectives for the Future: to tackle some of these issues. The top fiveBy-product Synergy objectives communities plan to set in theCommunity Spotlight:Belledune Port Authority, NB next two years are: 1. Upgrade water/sewer capacityThe Belledune Port Authority“encourages local industries to look 2. Encourage infill or intensificationat their by-products to see if 3. Improve transportation accessmarketable products can be sent to 4. Attract clean, ‘green’ businessother industries, rather than creatinglandfills”. 5. Encourage green buildingsPromoting by-product exchange such There are some other strategies as well. Foras this builds relationships within thebusiness community, turns waste existing lands, comprehensive sustainability-into resources, and has the potential driven revitalization strategies, such as theto generate significant cost savings. one to create the Pearson Eco-Business Zone in Greater Toronto (see sidebar page 7) can help to reduce demand for water, wastewater treatment, and transportation. Such efforts could also include formal business retention and expansion initiatives designed to promote Setting Sustainable sustainability, reduce business operating Objectives for the Future: costs, and create a more attractive, Sustainable Community Plans competitive business environment. Such eco- Community Spotlight: Ville de industrial ‘retrofit’ strategies can also reduce Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, QC the impact of businesses on nearby ecologically sensitive areas e.g., by helping In addition to multiple actions businesses to change the way they manage related to encouraging green buildings and development, stormwater. including in the industrial sector, the City is working with For existing and future lands, strong local multiple community partners, government policy and leadership is key. such as the Chamber of Local governments clearly recognize that Commerce, the Port of and the College of Valleyfield to develop their offiical plans and zoning bylaws are an industrial environmental powerful tools to encourage sustainability in network to promote recycling industrial lands. However, economic and improve its business development strategies, industrial land retention and expansion strategies, integrated community program. sustainabiliity plans, and community energy For more information view the Action plans also can help greatly, yet appear to be Plan at: http://www.ville.valleyfield .qc.ca/webc quite underutilized. oncepteurcontent63/000022410000/upl oad/PADD-E-WEBfinale16mars2010.pdf For the one-quarter of respondents who own their future industrial lands, they have the ability to actually lead change for sustainability by developing those lands as© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 18. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 14A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  eco-industrial parks or similar. As owners, they will be able to make the decisions to ensure that from master planning through to the construction of infrastructure and operation of businesses, sustainability is aSetting Sustainable core value.Objectives for the Future:Area Concept PlanningCommunity Spotlight: A Final Thought - What is the True MagnitudeTerrace, BC of Water / Sewer Capacity Issues?The community of Terrace, BC The same formulas have been used for“adopted an Area Concept Planthat incorporates large buffer decades to project how much infrastructurezones / natural areas, and how much land is required to support apedestrian/cycle trail linkages, certain number of jobs in a community.water conservation / low water These formulas do not take into account anuse development, groundwater evolution in building types (such as therecharge for stormwater, etc.” increased marketing penetration of green andFor more information adaptive building practices) or the evolutionview the Terrace OCP atwww.terrace.ca in business practices (such as energy and water conservation, facility sharing, and telecommuting) that reduce businesses’ demand for infrastructure. Efforts to intensify industrial land use should consider that the relationship between required industrial lands required and jobs is likely to shift over time as more suitable green building and business practices become more prevalent, as shown hypothetically below. Employment Land Area Vs Job Growth 550 500 Employmnt Land (acres) 450 400 350 Acres ‐ BAU 300 Acres ‐ Green 250 200 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 Jobs Possible Impact of Green & Adaptable Building and Business Practices on Employment Land Requirements© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 19. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 15A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Expand Your Wastewater  In addition, creative options such as water Capacity with No New Capital  capacity cap and trades (being considered in   Alberta’s Industrial Heartland) or technical There are numerous examples  re-rating of infrastructure capacity (see where process optimization and  sidebar) that can allow for existing statistical analysis of actual  operational data has resulted in a  infrastructure to meet the increased demand wastewater treatment plant  that may result from intensification. being re‐rated for a higher  capacity. For example, one  Furthermore, in our experience, engineering municipality was able to boost its  standards for estimating capacity capacity rating by 12% without  having to invest new capital in  requirements do not necessarily reflect the plant, and was able to  current reality; many demand estimates are significantly defer the  overstated because they don’t account for the construction of a new plant   change in business practices and the shift in   (Leaf & Johnson, Proceedings of the  the types of businesses we find in industrial Water Environment Federation, WEFTEC  lands compared to 50 years ago. Furthermore, 2008: Session 1 through Session 10 , pp.  331‐338(8)).  the demand for infrastructure varies widely,   and it might make sense to consider demand on a case by case basis. Consider, for example, the variation shown in water consumption at several business parks in the Metro Toronto area shown in the figure below.     F i g u r e 2 : V a r i a t i o n in Water Consumption at Business Parks across Metro Toronto Setting Sustainable Objectives for the Future: Green Industrial ParksCommunity Spotlight: Moncton, NBAlthough not labeled as an eco-industrial park, Moncton Industrial Park West has been designed tobe more environmentally attuned than past developments. This industrial park includes LEDstreetlighting and localized storm water detention facilities. Specifications require new individualprojects to manage their storm water on-site in order to ensure net zero impact on the municipalstorm system. A custom guide promotes environmentally sensitive landscaping treatments andintegrating storm water management into landscape design. An incentive in the form of a 5%rebate on the purchase price rewards projects that incorporate specific environmentally beneficialcomponents in their landscaping, building design and materials, and heating systems.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 20. 2011 State of Sustainability Report: 16A Local Government Perspective on Canada’s Industrial Lands  Conclusion While many communities report some progress, there is clearly much work to be done to ensure that Canada’s industrial lands become part of a sustainable community. ‘Soft’ investments are needed to develop appropriate policy and support sustainability- driven revitalization and business attraction / retention efforts, work which often requires outside expertise to complete. ‘Hard’ investments are needed to not just replace infrastructure, but replace it with infrastructure that further helps businesses to operate more efficiently and reduce their impact on the environment. We hope that subsequent surveys show that these investments are being made, or Canada risks its industrial lands losing competitiveness and hampering national efforts to achieve sustainable communities.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 21. We would like to acknowledge thank the survey participants for contributing their valuable time and insights to this survey.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd. 
  • 22. Eco-Industrial Solutions Ltd.2001-2011: Celebrating 10 years of Global Eco-Industrial LeadershipEIS is the only firm in Canada specializing exclusively in eco-industrial planning and development. Wehave been involved in creating sustainable municipal policy in communities across Canada for the pastdecade, and we bring a breadth of experience to green industrial efforts that includes eco-industrialstrategies; energy mapping; green economic development; policy tools for sustainability (including thepromotion of renewable energy and GHG-reducing activities); and municipal-business partnerships tosupport green building and energy. As pioneers in the field of industrial ecology and sustainabledevelopment practices, our firm has consulted on over $500 million in projects for government andprivate corporations in Canada, the U.S.A., Asia, Mexico, South America, and the Middle East.We have learned firsthand the challenges municipalities face setting targets, developing sustainableplans, and measuring the performance of their communities. We believe in working collaborativelywith our clients to provide solutions that are tailored to their unique economic, social andenvironmental objectives. Our systems-based approach incorporates leading expertise in eco-industrial networking, industrial ecology, green infrastructure, and strategic planning. We take pride inproducing results that are both practical and creative.Eco-Business Zone Alliance (EBZA)Eco-Industrial Solutions is a member of the Intelleco Development CorporationEBZA, a group of sustainability professionals Intelleco was formed by Herold Developmentwho assist businesses to green their bottom- Services Ltd. and Eco-Industrial Solutions Ltd.line, gain competitive advantage, and reduce to seek more active roles in Canadian, U.S.,their environmental footprint. We are joined in and international industrial developmentthis alliance by The Innovolve Group, offering projects with strong sustainability elements. Assustainability strategy development, EIS’ sister firm, Intelleco is structured to offercommunications, design, brand management a full spectrum of support to developmentand event planning to lead transformative projects including: alternative soft costmarket change; and the Sustainability Learning financing arrangements; developmentCentre, a learning, networking, and technology management services; development strategictransfer hub that develops human and advisory services; and investment partnerships.technical capacity in Green CoreCompetencies™ in the Industrial, Commercialand Institutional sectors.© Eco‐Industrial Solutions Ltd.